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The purpose of this thread is to showcase the man-made water features of the Midwest's urban areas. This includes public fountains, waterfalls, lakes, lily ponds, water gardens, and attractive canals. What does your city have?
 

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Great idea for a thread urbanjim!

Wausau Wisconsin in the 80's built a kayak and canoe course out of a mostly dried up river bed channel of the Wisconsin river right in the downtown. The city made it into a park called Wausau Whitewater Park. The reason why this can be called a man made water feature is because in order to make this all happen they had to landscape the riverbed with boulders in order to form the rapids and course.

It's part of the downtown dam system. The channel snakes it's way along the western shore of downtown; past beautiful rock and forestry, under old railroad bridges and throughfares. The only time the city opens up the lock for this channel is when there is a tournament, and when they do it turns into one of the more challenging whitewater slalom courses in the world as some of these pics will attest. The city hosts the USACK (USA Canoe/Kayak) Nationals, USACK Junior Olympics, and the Midwest Freestyle Championships, all of which are pretty much annual Summer events. It has hosted a few world championships but hasn't done so in quite a while.

Except for the first pic, all photos were taken by someone else from the Flickr website. I saved these over 3 years ago and have no clue who the photogragher is. Hopefully he/she wont mind me posting them.


Here is the channel when it isn't being used. This first pic shows the lock under the Scott St. bridge where it begins.




Here's a glimpse of what it looks like when flooded.




And here is what the kayakers go through!
























And of course you can't have a nice whitewater park and course without a statue and fountain.


Just a little more exciting than going down a sleepy canal in a little paddle boat hey? Course not as romantic though...
 

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Showing off Milwaukee again.
Just above downtown, on the lakefront, is Juneau Park. Below its bluffs, in the 1920's, Lincoln Memorial Drive was built. As part of that development a lovely and bucolic lagoon was created. Apparently now officially part of Veterans Park, the Juneau Park Lagoon remains a rather enchanting place to amble around, on foot, bike, or even upon in a paddle boat. And I think you can still fish in it.

(Milw.Mark aka markofphotography, if you're out there, show us some of your great pics of this place)





 

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The purpose of this thread is to showcase the man-made water features of the Midwest's urban areas. This includes public fountains, waterfalls, lakes, lily ponds, water gardens, and attractive canals. What does your city have?
So, any H2O in your burg (besides big Bud) making a splash you'd care to let us see?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So, any H2O in your burg (besides big Bud) making a splash you'd care to let us see?
Well, there IS the Gateway Geyser, which is the second-tallest fountain in the world, and the tallest in the Western Hemisphere. In fact, it's supposed to be approximately the same height as the Gateway Arch, located directly across the river.
I am sorry but I do not have any photos to post, but this is a link to a brief description along with a picture:

http://www.lewisandclarktrail.com/section1/illinoiscities/gatewaygeyser.htm
 

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The Yahara River that cuts through the isthmus on the near east side of Madison is mostly man-made. I was going to try to explain my understanding of how the project went down, but found the actual text from the historical marker:

In January 1903, the leader of Madison's park development and president of the Madison Park and Pleasure Drive Association, John M. Olin, presented a grand development plan for the Yahara River to city leaders. The plan called for deepening, widening and straightening the river between lakes Mendota and Monona and creating a parkway. In only six months and with contributions from many Madison citizens, Olin and the Park and Pleasure Drive Association raised the money and secured the land to begin construction. The Yahara River Parkway was designed by renowned landscape architect Ossian Cole Simonds, who fostered a regional style of landscape architecture known as the "Prairie School." Using native Midwestern plants such as hawthorne, dogwood, and crabapple, Simonds created a naturalistic landscape for the parkway. As part of the design, several bridges were erected or reconstructed, and a lock was built at the Mendota outlet for boat passage between the lakes. The parkway was completed in 1906.
What isn't mentioned, and somewhat unfairly, is that Daniel Tenney (Tenney Park) bought the land for the park and donated it to the city for the very purpose of essentially connecting the Yahara with Lake Mendota lakefront, before Olin even conceived the parkway. The kick-off of Tenney Park gave Olin the very idea to dredge, and straighten the river, and build locks actually physically connecting it to the lake.

The parkway, in my opinion, has been vastly underutilized, but it at least recently received a facelift of sorts with the East Washington Ave. reconstruction:





River:


Aerial (includes Tenney Park, which also has a man-made water feature):
 

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thats very cool i had no idea that this connected the two sides. can decent size boats get through?
 
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