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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
No other conflict has caused a higher loss and destruction of historical cities (around the World) than WWII.

The list of cities is long, but in order to make this thread organized I think we should only focus on cities destroyed during WWII (1939-1945) which in 1939 had more than 100 000 inhabitants.

Posts of new cities or discussions about new cities int the thread should consist a clear title, (For example: London - The capital of the British empire), a short line showing the pre-war population and the Coat of Arms of the city (Try to use the coat of arms from the Wikipedia page about the city). Then add images[/I]

Like this:

London - The capital of the British empire
Pre-war population: 8 100 000

 

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The amount of cultural heritage lost in China must be so incredible.

By the way, Hamburg was not less impressive. It had and has the highest count of tallest churches in the world.

 

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Greatest loss WWII (cities > 150.000)

Germany:
1 = Berlin (especially since Berlin has not been reconstructed and further
lost many buildings (10%?) and of 60% of all buildings its decorations.
2 = Dresden. Only a few buildings has since been rebuilt.
3 = Magdeburg. Virtually no reconstructions and large demolitions > 1945.
4 = Breslau
5 = Stettin
6 = Kassel (Altstadt, large parts of West-city)
7 = Köln (Ring, Inner City)
8 = Frankfurt (Zeil, Bahnhof Quartier)

Britain
1 = London
2 = Coventry
Poland:
1 = Warsaw
Netherlands:
1 = Rotterdam
France
1 = Le Havre, Lorient, Cherbourg

Italy, Soviet Union, Tjechp-slovakia, Yugoslavia, Greece, Belgium
- no serious architectural losses, most has been rebuilt
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Danzig/Gdansk (90 % of the historic core destroyed during the war)
Pre-War population: 250 000



All images are from fotopolska.eu website

A thousand-year history, a location at the crossroads of important commercial and communication routes, an extensive port and mercantile traditions - all this makes Gdańsk a meeting place of many cultures, nationalities (german, polish, dutch and italian) and denominations.

Gdansk boomed after receiving specific privileges from the Polish King Kazimierz Jagiellonczyk and the following centuries (1500-1700) are traditionally called the cities "golden age." During this time Gdańsk was one of the wealthiest and most significant cities in Europe. The religious freedom gained in the 16th century turned the city into a true melting pot of nationalities and denominations, giving it yet another stimulus for development, thanks to the specific "community of differences." It was one of the few such places in the world at the time. Gdansk became also home for one of the most famous astronomers: Johannes Hewelius/Jan Heweliusz.

The prosperity of the city was checked by the Swedish wars and partitions of Poland in the 18th century. The city was cut off from Poland and in 1793 it was annexed to Prussia.

In 1919, the Free City of Gdańsk was established under the Treaty of Versailles. Unfortunatly in march/april 1945 just before end of WWII, the entire medieval city was more or less turned into rubble by the Red Army during and after the battle of Festung Danzig.

Famous structures in the city: Neptun´s fountain, Arturs court, St. Mary´s church (largest brick church in the world, can take up to 25 000 people), St.Johns church, The great crane, Main city town hall, The Green Gate, The Golden gate, Highlander Gate, Uphagens house



http://pomorskie.fotopolska.eu/foto/258/258655.jpg


http://pomorskie.fotopolska.eu/foto/124/124390.jpg


http://pomorskie.fotopolska.eu/foto/136/136607.jpg


http://pomorskie.fotopolska.eu/foto/141/141743.jpg


http://pomorskie.fotopolska.eu/foto/177/177367.jpg


 

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Poland had the biggest looses during the WWII. I'm just too lazy to post diagrams here. Most of the buildings have never been restored. Thanks to uncle Stalin and Hitler :)
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Warsaw/Warszawa - The capital of Poland (90 % of the historic core destroyed)
Pre-War population: 1 300 000



All images are from fotopolska.eu website

Warsaw, nurturing over 400 years of pride as a capital, is Polands largest city and an economic, political, and cultural centre. The symbol of the city is the Mermaid, featured on the city seal.

After WWI Warsaw was reinstated as the capital of independent Poland and the urban development and industrialisation begun in the late 19th-century continued. By 1939, the city had grown to 1.3 million, of whom 380, 000 were Jews who had traditionally made up a significant part of Warsaw’s community.
German bombs began to fall on 1 September 1939 and a week later the city was besieged; despite brave resistance, Warsaw fell within a month. The conquerors instantly set about terrorising the local population with arrests, executions and deportations, and a Jewish Ghetto was swiftly built. The city rebelled against the Germans twice, first in April 1943 and second in August 1944. Both rebellions were ruthlessly crushed.

At the end of the war the city of Warsaw lay in ruins and 800, 000 people – more than half of the prewar population – had perished. (By comparison, the total military casualties for US forces in WWII was 400, 000, for UK forces 326, 000.)

Read more: http://www.lonelyplanet.com/poland/warsaw/history#ixzz2IhNSuaau

Most famous landmarks in pre-war Warsaw: Old and new town (Old town market square), Royal Castle, Lazienki park and Palace, The Warsaw mermaids, Saxon Palace and Tomb of the unknown soldier, Saxon gardens, Royal route (Krakowskie przedmiescie, Nowy Swiat, Aleje Ujazdowskie), The Jewish quarter of Muranow and its synagogues, St. Johns the baptist Cathedral, St. Anne´s Church, Marszalkowska Street and many more.



http://mazowieckie.fotopolska.eu/foto/9/9073.jpg


http://mazowieckie.fotopolska.eu/foto/52/52930.jpg


http://mazowieckie.fotopolska.eu/foto/89/89532.jpg


http://mazowieckie.fotopolska.eu/foto/201/201959.jpg


http://mazowieckie.fotopolska.eu/foto/18/18254.jpg


Pre-war Warsaw, with Varsovian music :)


Warsaw in 1945, the city is dead :cry:
 

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Cities lost (architectural value)

Stalingrad? It was built up with wooden houses and ugly flat blocks. Virtually nothing of architectural value. Yes thats a pity to hear for Russian folks isn't it?
An industrial city like Dortmund, Essen, Gelsenkirchen and Bochum was much more valuable than say a comparable Soviet industrial city. These cities had (and still have) splendid suburbs.
Valuable cities were: Mocba, Odessa, Charkow, Tblisi aso but these were not destroyed nor seriously damaged.
St Petersburg, Kiev, Lwow and a lot of smaller cities < 100.000 were indeed valuable but almost all has been restored.

Yes Danzig, Warsaw were certainly other large losses next to a dozen large German cities, London and Rotterdam.

Belgrado? It looks not much destroyed compared to German cities.

So in essence a dozen German cities, ex-German cities (now Polish) like Danzig, Breslau and Stettin, London, Warsaw and Rotterdam were the real losses.
 
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