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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Green City with Chinese Characteristics

'Socialism with Chinese Characteristics' is the official name for the typical mixed Chinese economic system. Now introducing you the ‘Green City with Chinese Characteristics’, a green and sustainable city adjusted to the Chinese context.


Edo Tokio, on Flickr

Coping with ongoing urbanisation
This own-developed, new to build green city can receive over 2 million inhabitants. Building new cities in China is a necessity because till 2050 roughly 300 million people will move from rural to urban areas. Since 1980 China is amidst the biggest migration wave in human history. Many existing cities are already overpopulated, polluted and congested. Those will never be able to receive those millions and millions of migrants.

So If you like it or not, China needs to build new cities. Urbanisation is unstoppable. The rural population realises that life in cities brings more opportunities and hopefully a higher quality of life. If that fact is accepted, we can focus on how to make this urbanisation process as eco-friendly as possible and create cities which do provide a good quality of life.


Combination of high population density and pleasant living conditions
The challenge was to come up with a city which is on one hand compact and has a high population density, and on the other hand provides a feeling of spaciousness and peace. So that inhabitants can live in a pleasant way amidst their many fellow urban dwellers. ‘Nature will be imported’ to the city to strengthen and/or re-establish the connection between the modern urbanite and nature. Besides, the city is designed in a way that it ‘nudges’ inhabitants to live in a sustainable way. For example distances are short, which means people can reach many places by foot or bike. These are just examples, there are many other 'best practice' concepts combined.


People who are more interested:
Can watch the short introduction video:
https://youtu.be/O_I-uM2g1t4

Or can consult this file to check out the proposed city in more detail:
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1jjBOYMvmFr5gJN37_E-1GI234Chnw9n6


I am curious what you think about the idea!


Edo Tokio, on Flickr
 

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I would have placed the lake to one side of the city center. It feels extremely counter-intuitive to cut off the main functional center from pedestrians and bikers. The urban fabric in the everyday city looks pleasant, but I wonder if the 33x33m grid is too tiny, there is a LOT of streets, more than is useful I'd say. Combining 4-9 complexes would open up a more useable green area in the middle, provide a chance for sunlight to penetrate, and utilize the plots better(more people can now live close to the metro). And I miss some sort of big green park, for events, sports and so on.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
@Huggkruka, thanks for the feedback! This is an ongoing project, all feedback is welcome! I am just a hobbyist, not an architecture student / architect / urban planner, so I do lack some good feedback in my nearby social environment. Luckily Skyscrapercity is a good platform for some feedback :)

I might add some bridges to the city center, you are right that only a metro connection is not enough.

The grid is 100m * 100m, not 33m * 33m.

And you are right about the lack of big parks in the city, I think I am gonna leave some plots open for big parks instead of housing.

What do you mean by 4-9 complexes?
 

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Ik heb het plan verder ontwikkeld en samengevat in een PDF (https://drive.google.com/open?id=1SbUdQH5MTNXRjcroMmZPVGnnI_r7qNU7)

Ik probeer met de stad een (begin van een) antwoord te geven op een vraagstuk waar we de komende decennia voor staan met toenemende verstedelijking. Namelijk:

Hoe combineer je:

-een compacte stad met hoge woondichtheid (buitengebied sparen en veel mensen huisvesten)​
-veel stedelijk groen (mensen hebben natuur nodig)​
-menselijke maat (geringe mate van hoogbouw)​

Opdat bewoners het gemakkelijker wordt gemaakt duurzaam te leven​


Ik ben benieuwd wat jullie er van vinden!
 

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Don't forget the importance of the famed Chinese streetlife, whereby people are used to living a great part of their daily life outdoors, in the street -and nowadays, parks also. In the old days it included work, cooking, washing, washing up, games, sport, entertainment, socialising, streetwork, barbers etc.














I'd reintroduce not just plenty of public benches, but 'street tables'

 

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Put a courtyard and garden in any Western development and it'll be rarely used and look pretty when residents enter and exit. In the postwar years it would be in danger of becoming a neglected wasteground, with residents isolated into their apartments. However do the same in China and it becomes an all hours community hub, which is why the Courbousien tower-in-a-park idea is so much more successful there.





gonna be hard but focus on the background, that's the kind of traditional streetlife in the noughties that was being transposed into the parks (c.2010):


Fast forward to 2020 and increasingly the parks are busy with old folk, and the young are staying indoors more (like in the West). If you can reverse this trend using urban planning would be key, eg 6G, free charging, basketball, gaming centres, pool tables, gyms (weight free ones for the older set, with weights for the youth) etc

Also outdoor dance floors are seriously big for retirees, who use any patch for ballroom dancing to traditional fan dances to violin recitals, to choir practice. A young person version sounds like an impossibility but hey...

old folk dominate the numerous pavilions and outdoor gyms:





Retail round the world has taken a battering due to online shopping, with endless amounts of shopping malls closed down. However in China they were converted en masse into 'experience centres' eg gyms, pools, food, after school clubs etc. If you can somehow do the same for the outdoor spaces for young people, you'll save the traditional Chinese way of life.

 

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Discussion Starter #7
@Spliff Fairy thanks a lot for your input. Indeed I need to take into account the typical Chinese streetlife.
And I like the idea to attract young people into parcs by free charging, good internet connection, game tables, etc.
Indeed, it struck me too when I was in Guangzhou in 2016 that all the parcs were heavily used by elderly (whereas in The Netherlands where I am from elderly people stay inside) and young people were mostly absent.
 
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