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Stylish enough... but again, as like a few other projects, for such a prime piece of real estate, a shame it wasn't a couple levels taller.
I just hate the way that the north side of Cashel Street has mostly 5 and 6 storey buildings, with the short 2-3 storey buildings being built on the south side. Cashel Street is in shadow for most of the day now, which isn't very pleasant especially with a cold easterly breeze blowing down the street. I would rather the short buildings were on the north side, and the tall ones on the south.
 

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Can you imagine Mr Gough thinking "**** it, I'm only building 2 stories high to keep the pedestrians on Cashel st in the sun"!
Or Mr Peebles thinking "I'm going to build 7 stories to help block the wind out even though my building will sit empty and burn a hold in my pocket"
Investors build to demand...... Not what works well for a street
 

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Can you imagine Mr Gough thinking "**** it, I'm only building 2 stories high to keep the pedestrians on Cashel st in the sun"!
Or Mr Peebles thinking "I'm going to build 7 stories to help block the wind out even though my building will sit empty and burn a hold in my pocket"
Investors build to demand...... Not what works well for a street
Well exactly. I'm not criticising the developers here, and 6 stories is hardly a skyscraper anyway, just saying that when you look at the height of the buildings emerging along this street, it would have been more logical to have the taller buildings on the south side of the street and shorter buildings on the north side to capture more sunlight in wintertime especially. Obviously it was originally envisaged that both sides of the street would have similar height buildings but it didn't turn out that way.

Regardless, I'm just pleased to see more empty sites being built on. Nothing worse than a city full of potholed, gravel car parks, foundations of demolished buildings, and run down cordoned off buildings nearly eight years after the first earthquake. I do really love some of the new architecture, such as at The Crossing and The Terrace and it's great to see so many people out and about in the city every day.
 

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Also lets not forget the courtyard of the BNZ building. I often find myself incentivised to enter the lane ways and sit in the courtyard to capture the sun and this wasn't possible pre-quake even with some of the two/three level buildings still casting a shade on Cashel Mall during winter. I'm sure the same can be said for the court yard area of The Terrace and hopefully some of Pebble's lane ways on the south side.
 

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I'm sure the same can be said for the court yard area of The Terrace and hopefully some of Pebble's lane ways on the south side.
I'm hopeful that the new laneways in Pebble's development are good this time round. I've found the laneways he's built on Durham St, Kilmore St, and the Mackensie and Willis development to all be very dark and basically concrete corridors so I hope he can pull it off on a main street such as Cashel St.
 

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First shops open in new central Christchurch complex with more to come​


Another milestone in Christchurch's retail precinct has been reached with the completion of the Guthrey Centre rebuild. The new Cashel St development has 15 stores in four buildings separated by two laneways. One lane links Ballantynes department store to the Lichfield St parking building, the first time since the earthquakes that the connection has been opened. Developer Richard Peebles has signed tenants for about half the new stores, and is on the hunt for more. He said it was "awesome" to have the complex open. Sweet Soul Patisserie is already trading, with rugby clothing retailer Champions of the World due to follow before Christmas. Other tenants, which Peebles said he could not yet name, will open early next year and include fashion and technology stores. Peebles bought the site for $12 million last year from Peter Guthrey, who had owned the Guthrey Centre on the site for several decades and had tenants including Country Road and a food court. The late 19th century building was demolished after the earthquakes and the land later housed part of the Re:Start container mall. Initially Peebles courted international fashion retailer Zara for the site, but when the chain pulled out of plans to expand into New Zealand he built for smaller tenants instead. The new buildings are clad in a mixture of textured concrete and timber, with double height glass frontages. One forms part of the city council-owned parking building. Interiors are being fitted out now. The lanes are paved in Australian and Chinese bluestone, and are about to be equipped with seats, lighting, canopies and mature boxed tī kōuka (cabbage trees). "The laneways are the most crucial part of it. It's about activating the spaces and opening up the centre of the block," Peebles said. He estimated the complex is worth $25m to $30m. A competition will be run to choose interactive street art for some of the laneway walls, and another wall will host street art that will be auctioned for charity. Peebles said he did not consider the other retail precinct shopping complexes such as the ANZ Centre, BNZ Centre and The Crossing as competitors, as they were working together "to create a critical mass" and attract shoppers. While he is still seeking retailers and leasing agents have been "chasing tenants" in Australia, he wanted the right mix and has turned some away, he said. Sweet Soul owner Tania Scur said her business, which has been open a few weeks, had a big jump in customer numbers as soon as the lane opened. "It's great. Everyone coming in is so happy to see the link opened up," she said. The new complex will eventually connect up with Peebles' 80-tenant Riverside Farmers Market development, which is under construction now at the river end of the block and will be completed next year. He said winter had been quiet in the retail precinct, but things had become really busy in the past few weeks. Roadworks were still putting people off though and he wanted the city council to hurry up and finish them, he said.

The Press

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A shame regarding Zara not wanting to expand further into the New Zealand market, I wonder how long the Auckland store will last, seems like its heading down the same road as Topshop?
 
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