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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It is indeed Yorkshire Day. I hope you are celebrating all things Yorkshire!




http://www.bbc.co.uk/leeds/content/articles/2009/07/30/yorkshireday_feature.shtml

What's so special about Yorkshire?

August 1st is an inauspicious day across most of England but in Yorkshire it has become the day to celebrate all that is good about God’s own county

The cynics in us may see Yorkshire Day as a marketing ploy, a chance for shops to push sales of Wensleydale cheese and Yorkshire tea while tourists gawp at the locals who "speak funny", drinking bitter in t'pub, saving enough brass for chips wi' bits on t'way 'ome.

However there is the worry that people actually believe the Hovis adverts; where ruddy faced families sit down together to eat tripe, onions and Yorkshire pudding. If Yorkshire is seen a place still living in the 1950s, complete with the stereotype of men with flat caps racing ferrets, potential investors may be less likely to relocate to the region.

On the streets of Leeds, Geraldine Woodhead is shopping with her daughter Nicky. She says the flat cap image of the region still persists but people don't really believe it: "Leeds is a wonderful place to live, I wouldn't live anywhere else. My son lives in London and people ask him if his dad keeps ferrets and wears a flat cap.

"It is an image people have from down south, but I don't think people take it seriously anymore"

Arthur Fielding is 73 years old and has lived in Leeds all his life. Arthur still keeps ferrets but agrees that Leeds has changed over the years: "As a child we used to eat offal as we couldn't afford meat. Now people eat chicken nuggets because they are cheap and easy to cook. They are missing out on good flavoursome food.

"My wife used to go to the butchers and get two big marrowbones boil them up and make marrowbone broth and dumplings. People don't cook like that anymore."

They certainly don't at Leeds restaurants with their dizzying array of cultures and delicacies. The city has a well-established population of ethnic minorities, and restaurants recreate specialties from every corner of the globe. Leeds is also the home to Tetley's brewery, so there is always something on hand to wash dinner down with.

After dinner there is always somewhere to go with over 150 clubs in the city. Leeds is a breeding ground for new artists. In the past the Gang of Four, the Mekons and the Three Johns firmly put West Yorkshire on the map while the Kaiser Chiefs and Corinne Bailey Rae have re-established its musical credentials today

Many people originally come to Leeds to study. It has two of the most popular universities in England, complete with the highest graduate retention rates.

Naomi Stutt says: "I came to Leeds to study in 1997. I fell in love with Yorkshire and stayed. Living down south I have never heard of 'bits' on chips, back to back houses and had no idea what a ginnel was. Yet the dramatic landscape of the windswept moors, the granite pavements of Malham, the beautiful beaches and the red brick houses with washing criss-crossing the streets seduced me."

Others come across the county borders to come shopping, whether it is under the beautiful spires of Leeds Market where traders shout out their wares, promising quantity if not always quality. (Where else can you get three punnets of strawberries for a pound at 4pm on a Saturday afternoon?) Or among the boutiques in the stunning Victoria Quarter, Leeds provides some of the most prestigious shops in the north of England.

There is also world class cricket and rugby on the doorstep and maybe one day world class football will return too.

Bryan Smith is proud to be from Leeds and thinks Yorkshire Day should be celebrated: "This county is called the Broad Acres because that's what it is. Over the years the countryside and the towns are coming together. Fifty years ago if you went to the Dales it sounded like they were from a different part of the country, now everyone is more connected. Yorkshire is God’s own county; it's a very special place."
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BBC North Yorkshire

Yorkshire is the largest county in the UK, with a population of over five million people; that's almost twice the size of Wales!

The picturesque backdrop of the Dales and the glorious North York Moors; Castle Howard, Mother Shipton's Cave, Brimham Rocks and Harrogate's Valley Gardens; Whitby Abbey, York Minster and the Shambles. These are just a few examples of well-known local landmarks, which attract thousands of visitors to the area every year. These landmarks are also some of the reasons to celebrate Yorkshire Day.

Why Yorkshire Day?

The idea of Yorkshire Day came about during a meeting of the Yorkshire Ridings Society in 1974. They chose a date for the event, 1 August, and in 1975 the first ever Yorkshire Day took place.

Yorkshire Day celebrates everything Yorkshire, but especially the integrity of the historic county and every year, on that day, members of the society read a declaration of the integrity of Yorkshire at each of the four Bars of York; the gates into the old walled city. The declaration is read facing into each of the three ridings and into the city.

The 1 August is also the anniversary of the Battle of Minden.

The Battle of Minden

In 1759, during the Seven Years War, two French armies worked their way across Western Germany, capturing important towns on their way. Both French armies commanded by Marquis de Contades and The Duc de Broglie lay at the town of Minden, threatened to invade.
The 51st Foot, The Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry
The Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry at the battle of Minden

An allied force made up of Prussian, Hanoverian and British forces, of which the Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry was one, under the command of Prince Ferdinand lay to the North West of the town.

On 1 August 1759, on their way to battle, British forces passed through gardens in Minden which were blooming with roses. The soldiers picked white roses and placed them in their headdresses and coats.

The allied army defeated the French and Minden Day is celebrated on 1st August. In all battalions of the Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, now part of the Yorkshire Regiment, a white rose is worn in their caps to commemorate those who fell during battle.

The official Yorkshire Flag was first unfurled in 2008

The official Yorkshire flag was unfurled in Hull on 29 July 2008. The white rose on a blue background has been used across the county since 1965 (although it could be earlier), but was not recognised by the Flag Institute as the official flag for Yorkshire.

The flag's new status has now been agreed by the Flag Institute after a request was entered by the Yorkshire Ridings Society.
 

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As a Yorkshire nationalist I'm more than happy to see the English flag lowered on the Town Hall and replaced with a Yorkshire flag, but I find the Yorkshire Ridings society's little ceremonies more than embarrassing. And for all their efforts, nobody seems to know what Yorkshire day is for or about, and they haven't managed to reinstate the Ridings... yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
As a Yorkshire nationalist I'm more than happy to see the English flag lowered on the Town Hall and replaced with a Yorkshire flag, but I find the Yorkshire Ridings society's little ceremonies more than embarrassing. And for all their efforts, nobody seems to know what Yorkshire day is for or about, and they haven't managed to reinstate the Ridings... yet.
I have actually noticed quite a few Yorkshire flags around today, often in replacement of English flags.

Yes I can't say I'm a particular fan of that society. Their ceremonies are a bit twee- there are a lot of traditional things to celebrate but modern Yorkshire is quite different to what they would like to promote I think.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes I thought that was an interesting picture to use. Not because of Opal, just because you would expect a picture of the Dales or York Minster etc. Quite happy they have not used a picture like that though!
 

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:cheers1: HAPPY YORKSHIRE DAY!! :cheers1:​

Wishing everyone all the Yorkshire best. Apparently, latest research by cosmologists has confirmed that Yorkshire is, in fact, the centre of the Universe! :cheer::cheer::cheer::cheer::cheer::cheer:

Hope you all have chance to do something Yorkshire today. At a very minimum, I'll be having some Fat Rascals...


and a pint of Riggwelter...


There's stuff going off all over the county (including in so-called 'Teesside', whatever that is).

Apparently there's a Yorkshire Day barbecue this evening at Temple Newsam - it should have stopped raining by that time!

If you missed things today, then the celebrations continue tomorrow. For example, there's a Yorkshire fun day at Oakwell Hall, Birstall (not far from where the great Joseph Priestley was born).

There'll be music from Grange Moor Brass Band, longsword dancing from the Kirkburton Rapiers and visitors will also get a chance to pledge their allegiance to the county with the help of the Town Crier. Oakwell Hall is of course a true Yorkshire star in its own right as it's featured in Shirley by Charlotte Bronte - one of Yorkshire's biggest names.

In addition, there'll also be a display of Jowett classic cars which were built in Bradford in the first half of the 20th century. There'll also be welly-wanging and knurr and spell :)dunno: er, if you like that sort of thing :dunno:).



Right, I'm off into town now. Where did I put that umbrella?
 

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"Yorkshire will always be special"

Another rainy cloudy Yorkshire Day, what more could we ask for?

Yorkshire Day was first celebrated in 1975 in Beverley by the Yorkshire Ridings Society to recognise the integrity of the county following the re-organisation of Local Government in 1974.

Yorkshire was the first county in England to have an official county day and the celebration is now marked in towns and cities across the region.

August 1 was chosen as it is the anniversary of the Battle of Minden fought during the Seven Years War.

On this day in 1759 soldiers from Yorkshire regiments picked white roses from bushes near to the battlefield as a tribute to their fallen comrades.

To mark the 250th anniversary of the battle, Roger Sewell, vice-chairman of the society, and his wife are walking more than 250 miles from the Man-sion House in York to Min-den in Ger-many to present the Burg-ermeister of the city with a Yorkshire rose and raise money for the British Legion.

August 1 is also the birthday of William Wilberforce, a Yorkshire MP, who fought for the abolition of slavery.

Each year members of the society read a declaration of the integrity of Yorkshire.

For the first three years following Yorkshire Day’s creation, members of the society walked from Sedbergh to Spurn Point, near Hull, reading the declaration in each of the region’s three ridings.

Walking around York’s city walls was later found to be an easier way of passing through the three ridings and the declaration is now read facing into each one.

From 2007 readings were also held in York city centre.

More than 100 people gathered for a traditional fish and chip lunch in Bradford on Friday in support of the Lord Mayor’s Appeal and were entertained by Morris dancers.

The event at the Great Victoria Hotel on Bridge Street raised £700 for Councillor John Godward’s charities, Bradford and District Senior Power and Little Heroes Cancer Trust.

Meanwhile, other Yorkshire Day celebrations were taking place across the Bradford district on Saturday.

In Ilkley the celebrations were due to start with a declaration by the Town Crier outside the Town Hall at 11.32am followed by a concert with the Clifton & Lightcliffe Band in the Winter Gardens.

Yorkshire chutney and pastry design competitions and a performance from Grassington’s Penny Plain Theatre Company were also being held.

Haworth Fine Food Festival was being held in Central Park in the village today with cookery demonstrations by celebrity chef Jean-Christophe Novelli and displays by chefs at Bradford restaurants, including Robert Ramsden and Somjai Sutthaso, of Chino Thai restaurant, on Sunday.

Visitors arriving at Leeds-Bradford International Airport today were being greeted by the Welcome to Yorkshire samba band, which features on TV advertisements for the region.


http://www.thetelegraphandargus.co.uk/news/4524054._Yorkshire_will_always_be_special_/
 

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'Yorkshire nationalists'? What an odd idea!
 

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Happy Yorkshire Day to all Northern Monkeys and Southern Fairies of the Leeds forum!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Can't say I find it too bad. I'm glad they marked it and I'd be lying if I said I didn't want to see performances and music broadcast on TV.

Was quite impressed with the ad breaks on TV tonight- so many Yorkshire adverts! One ad break there were no less than four Yorkshire-related adverts out of five or six. Plusnet, Yorkshire Tea, Welcome to Yorkshire and Aunt Bessie's Yorkshire Puddings.
 
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