SkyscraperCity banner

1 - 20 of 522 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
534 Posts
Nice. :)

Looks like a great new development which will add massive value and bring new life to the CBD.

It's always good to see ugly under-utilised land being redeveloped.
 

·
South Straddie QLD
Joined
·
10,881 Posts
mo you da king, I was actually mentioning this on the culemborg thread
I was looking at the site acress the freeway where that massive fugly shed is situated.
This will be a natural extantion of the CBD
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
403 Posts
I found this bit of information about Culemborg on the Cape Town Partnership site:
Main development projects

The Culemborg Development Framework prepared for the site in 2001 is an approved framework for the neighbourhood. The framework proposes high density, mixed-use development on site. The unlocking of development constraints will facilitate development of this prime piece of land.


article found: http://capetownpartnership.co.za/programmes/centralcitydevelopmentstrategy/Culemborg.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28,982 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
mo you da king, I was actually mentioning this on the culemborg thread
I was looking at the site acress the freeway where that massive fugly shed is situated.
This will be a natural extantion of the CBD
Don't want to be king, Just want these developments to Go ahead and not end up as pipe dreams.!!!!
 

·
South Straddie QLD
Joined
·
10,881 Posts
Don't want to be king, Just want these developments to Go ahead and not end up as pipe dreams.!!!!
come on bro, every one wants to be king for just one day!!!!!

Facts-City needs to densify along arterial routes, CBD full and desification and high rise development mean replancent of low rise which is costly. City needs to define the natural expansion of thre city and plan acordingly wrt services, tranbsportation etc, logical expansion of the CBD as its only "flat" undebveloped route left.

many factors contribute but I dont see this happening next year but its good to see the city planning its future
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28,982 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
come on bro, every one wants to be king for just one day!!!!!

Facts-City needs to densify along arterial routes, CBD full and desification and high rise development mean replancent of low rise which is costly. City needs to define the natural expansion of thre city and plan accordingly wrt services, transportation etc, logical expansion of the CBD as its only "flat" undeveloped route left.

many factors contribute but I dont see this happening next year but its good to see the city planning its future
Actually read an article the other day that made sense. It criticized RSA's focus on rural industrial policies/investments e.g. forcing unnatural investments into certain areas which create unsustainable long term projects e.g. making a random port in PE the energy or main container terminal hub to stimulate the area.

If RSA's government focused more on e.g. investing heavily in URban areas this would pay off in the long run e.g. a cruise terminal in CT, PE and DBN, convention/exhibition complexes, heavily funding and supporting urban investments in naturally successful urban developments.

Ok thats vague. I'll find the article.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28,982 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Actually read an article the other day that made sense. It criticized RSA's focus on rural industrial policies/investments e.g. forcing unnatural investments into certain areas which create unsustainable long term projects e.g. making a random port in PE the energy or main container terminal hub to stimulate the area.

If RSA's government focused more on e.g. investing heavily in URban areas this would pay off in the long run e.g. a cruise terminal in CT, PE and DBN, convention/exhibition complexes, heavily funding and supporting urban investments in naturally successful urban developments.

Ok thats vague. I'll find the article.
Here is the article.


SA’s growth policy ‘ at odds ’ with World Bank advice

MATHABO LE ROUX Published: 2009/07/16 06:26:07 AM

SOME of SA’s key growth policy thrusts, including the flagship industrial strategy and a plan to spur economic activity in rural areas, were implicitly faulted in the World Bank’s latest development report, released yesterday.

The report, discussed yesterday at a World Bank-Development Bank of Southern Africa event attended by top policy makers in the public and private sectors, highlights developmental approaches that are at odds with SA’s choices.



Its findings suggest SA’s policy could be out of step with mainstream thinking on economic development approaches.

The report itself, however, also came in for robust criticism, underscoring mounting distrust of supranational organisations after decades of policy recommendations, some of which have misfired.

Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan questioned whether the report took a “frank enough look at history”. He stressed global imbalances, with the fate of African countries tied inevitably to decisions taken in the developed world. Referring to the report’s key node of reshaping economic geography , Gordhan said the study assumed markets were static. “If the existing markets will always remain the same ones, when will the 900- million people in Africa become the market? How do we create effective demand in Africa?”









Centring its recommendations on density, distance and diversity, the report argues for development approaches to “increase density” by focusing on urban development; “decreasing distance” by improving infrastructure and reducing the cost of transport and “decreasing divisions” through the active pursuit of integration strategies at regional level to create big markets that can take part in the global system meaningfully.



While stressing the need for the sustained provision of quality services in rural areas, the study makes a case for economic development focused on urbanisation strategies. This is in contrast to the government’s plan to inject resources into rural areas to stimulate economic activity, notably by establishing economic development zones and new industries such as biofuels, as well as the strategic location of sectors such as business process outsourcing in economically inactive areas.


“The simple rule is to address constraints,” report co-author Uwe Deichmann said at the presentation of the report .

“ As a rule, governments should start with common institutions and ensure that everybody benefits, but it should be more circumspect about introducing economic interventions that boost opportunities where these do not exist naturally.”






Spatial targeting was overemphasised, he said, cautioning that resources spent on spatially targeted subsidies were often wasted.



“The report does not say that people should move to cities, but inevitably with development people will move to cities and one needs to prepare for that. Successful growth policies will encourage migration to urban areas, so states should be careful of designing rural policies that encourage economic activities that won’t be pursued in the long term,” he said.



Deichmann was dismissive of the success rate of industrial policy interventions. “Picking winners is not working well. It is expensive and the opportunity costs are high,” he said, calling for growth led by


the private sector, with states rather playing a role in reducing the costs of doing business.





The report’s recommendations are in contrast with SA’s vision for sweeping state intervention to drive industrial growth and an ambitious rural development plan, both at the top of the new government’s agenda.

A recommendation for greater regional integration strategies to create bigger markets that can be successfully integrated in the global economy also tacitly challenges SA’s seeming reluctance to pursue a more proactive regional integration agenda.





But the report came in for robust criticism, with respondents questioning its uniform prescription to deal with diverse countries’ unique problems.

The criticism underscores the newfound geopolitical leverage of developing countries, given impetus by the global slump. It highlights increasing developing world reluctance to accept prescriptions of institutions such as the World Bank and International Monetary Fund, whose one-size-fits-all policies have harmed some economies.

[email protected]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
If that development goes through, it is a welcome addition to a (in my eyes) forgotten area of CT.

But can someone tell me what they plan to do with neighbouring District Six? I visited Cape Town a couple of times and the District Six Museum particularly made a big impression on me. I realise that the history of the area should be preserved, but then again it is a prime location for new developments, which has been laying bare for many years. Why can't they try to refurbish it and make it a multicultural urban neighbourhood again? Like it once was?

PS listen to Gordhan, def. not the Worldbank or IMF. Read Patrick Bond and his accounts on Global Apartheid...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28,982 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
If that development goes through, it is a welcome addition to a (in my eyes) forgotten area of CT.

But can someone tell me what they plan to do with neighbouring District Six? I visited Cape Town a couple of times and the District Six Museum particularly made a big impression on me. I realise that the history of the area should be preserved, but then again it is a prime location for new developments, which has been laying bare for many years. Why can't they try to refurbish it and make it a multicultural urban neighbourhood again? Like it once was?

PS listen to Gordhan, def. not the Worldbank or IMF. Read Patrick Bond and his accounts on Global Apartheid...
Will check out that book.

District 6 will remain delayed and stalled for many years to come. We have a chunk of land there but each time we register, the next time we are told we are not registered on some list so I think my father has given up but I'm pretty keen to get hold of it!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28,982 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Architectural firm dhk is also preparing an urban design master plan for “an enormous piece of property” representing six city blocks, says Fehrsen. The whole development will be some 200 000 m² of bulk in the Oswald Pirow/Culemborg area. Edge Properties and a number of partners have secured the lease. This is a mixed use scheme with office, retail, residential and hotel opportunities, and concepts are being developed for individual site buildings. A number of appropriate height buildings will flank the highway, with the possibility of a few taller towers as well. Parking will be in a super basement and will also fit neatly under the highway. It will have strong links to the bus rapid transport system, and is being planned from the outset as a sustainable development that will include “a hierarchy of public spaces”.
Courtesy of Foxyman
 
1 - 20 of 522 Posts
Top