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A Christchurch Son
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OLD CIVIC Building

My first attempt at a new thread didn't work............:eek:hno:

Anyway - with the new city council building nearly ready to be occupied by the Christchurch City Council - what will happen to the old one on the Tuam Street site............
 

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A Christchurch Son
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4,530 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Reported in The Press...

A deal on who will own and develop the present Christchurch City Council offices could be signed within weeks.

Three developers last year expressed interest in the Tuam St site.

Yesterday, the council said it was "continuing discussions" with a preferred developer it would not name.

It hoped those talks would be completed by the end of next month.

More than 1200 staff will move into the new Hereford St civic building in August.

The present building is owned by Tuam Ltd, a council subsidiary.

Council corporate services general manager Paul Anderson said the council wanted the property to be developed as a first step in revitalising the central city's south precinct.

A council-endorsed concept plan said the building should retain existing heritage features.

The ground floor could be converted for commercial use, with car parking on the first level, and the upper floors turned into residential properties.

Tuam Ltd paid $116,941.20 in rates this year, with $16,476.66 of those rates to Environment Canterbury.

It paid about another $40,000 to insure the property.

The council bought the property in 1978 and moved in two years later.
 

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1,997 Posts
Tear it down and stick something that's 200m in it's place! Twin towers with the Tuam car park!!

CHC with 2 buildings 200m or over
[ON PAR WITH PERTH]


If only...
 

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A Christchurch Son
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4,530 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Unfortunately they can't pull this one down - it has a heritage order on it.

It was originaly built as the Millers Department Store. I think if it is sypathetically restored and given a modern twist it will help kick start more developments. From memory the lanes connect with the building, so it could become part of that network of regeneration...
 

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I suspect that most of it can't be used for commercial uses, at least going by what the council said before they build their new castle. Therefore it will be residential or commercial.

I don't know, but I doubt you'd be able to get high value appartments (1 mil plus), not when there are better sites. So it could be Christchurch's first large, affordable appartment building. And can only be good for Chch.
 

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A Christchurch Son
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4,530 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That's what we need - affordable housing and apartments of all shapes and sizes in the city.
 

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A Christchurch Son
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4,530 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Going, going, gone??? anyone?

It would be good if it's gone - save demolition fees, and frees up more space for the beauty that will be our new city.
 

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Going, going, gone??? anyone?

It would be good if it's gone - save demolition fees, and frees up more space for the beauty that will be our new city.
The new city to be built without the assistance of private enterprise, since civil defense are hell-bent on antagonising and alienating most of the CBD business and property owners?


http://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/news/christchurch-earthquake-2011/4777114/Breach-of-cordon-essential

Breach of cordon 'essential'
OLIVIA CARVILLE


Frustrated business owners have been forced to breach the inner-city cordon and sneak out essential items for survival.

Christchurch property owner Antony Gough said he had no choice but to sneak past the cordon, raid his damaged buildings and pull out critical equipment.

Gough, who owns 12 buildings within the cordon, said he had been on many "party raids" for computers and servers since the quake.

The equipment was broken down and taken out in parts in people's pockets.

"It is shameful that we have to go to these sorts of extremes to get life back into these businesses," he said.

One of Gough's Hereford St buildings was demolished without his permission.

The Central City Business Association chairman said he was declaring war against the "cowboys that are pulling the fabric out of the city".

"It is anarchy from the top down," he said. "They have taken lethal blows to the business community, and we are rising to fight back. I have no fear of them. The gloves are off and we are after them for blood."

Gough believed buildings that could be saved were being demolished by careless officials.

He said his demolished building, which housed the Vivace Espresso Bar and Fortuna Books, was destroyed because it was the same colour as its badly damaged neighbouring building. "They were different buildings but, unfortunately, I painted them the same colour, and it was a cream day that day. Every building that was cream in Hereford St was demolished."

Gough was not warned before the demolition. Neither was the business owner given a chance to salvage anything.

"They had expensive imported coffee machines in there we easily could have saved. They didn't even call me. The person who flattened my building needs to be fired," Gough said.

The destroyed building had been attached to Shands Emporium and had left a gaping hole in the heritage building.

Gough wants to secure and protect his buildings.

He said it was criminal to allow politicians and the Prime Minister to walk through the cordon area but deny access to property owners. "There are buildings that desperately need propping and there is an overzealousness to keep us out of there to supposedly protect the public, but there is no public in there ... so what exactly are they protecting?"

Gough, who owns Oxford Tce buildings, said many were damaged and needed to be secured. He fears they will be unsalvageable by the time he gains access.

"My rights have been taken away from me. They are saying we can't go in there, but I am sorry, I say that is b........"
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Gough believed Christchurch was living under a dictatorship.

"They could line their bulldozers up and level the city tomorrow, and they are within their right to do it," he said. "We can't challenge anything because they are protected by the national state of emergency. We can't sue them. They have total dictatorship status."

"I will not go away and I will demand answers," he said, also asking compassion.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/news/christchurch-earthquake-2011/4777110/Memorabilia-salvage-hopes-in-ruins

Memorabilia salvage hopes in ruins
Owner upset with communication breakdown
MICHAEL FOX

OFF THE MENU: Restaurant Association president Michael Turner said his central-city restaurant, Cafe Valentino, was demolished without his knowledge.

Christchurch Earthquake 2011
Huge setback for hospitality staff Aftershocks quieten but scientists expect more jolts Classes delayed again Big change for Shirley boys Proprietors angry over search damage Button's ECan view rubbished Scientists see no reason not to rebuild city Girls giggle as school site-sharing takes off Suburban bars feel luck of the Irish Many big events will still go ahead

A Christchurch restaurant owner, told his business was too unsafe to salvage items from inside, says soldiers had entered and removed furniture to sit on.

Restaurant Association president Michael Turner said Cafe Valentino was demolished without his knowledge in spite of assurances it would not be.

He said he had already made plans to demolish the Colombo St cafe, but had hoped to salvage as much as possible, including 20 years of memorabilia. That included posters and items signed by stars such as Johnny Cash, who had played at the Town Hall and visited the cafe.

"The upsetting part of that is we were told that we couldn't go in because it's too dangerous, yet the soldiers were able to do so."

Turner said he bore no ill will towards the soldiers, who had been helpful, but he had spoken to officials about the chairs that were removed.

He said he had been in regular contact with Civil Defence and had registered his landline and cellphone numbers, as well as his email address, and was assured he would be given notice before the building was demolished.

"What we wanted was 20 minutes [to get stuff out]."

He said at 10.10am on Tuesday, someone from Urban Search and Rescue had left a message on his home phone telling him the building was coming down.

"I wasn't at home. I thought they could've at least called my mobile."

Communication by officials with business owners was "absolutely terrible".

"You're lucky if you can get to speak to the same person twice down at the Earthquake Recovery Centre," he said. "They're just not giving consideration to what's going to happen after their state of emergency is over."

Turner said if any plans were being made, they had not been communicated to business owners.

There would be a "mass migration" of businesses to the suburbs, leaving Christchurch with "nothing left in the central city".

"Every city needs a heart," he said.

"If we're going to rebuild the centre of town, we're going to need better co-operation than what we're currently getting."
 

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^^^ That's cool about Curator House. There are little pockets of resistance here and there to preserving some character and not automatically pulling everything down. Good on the Council. This is particularly important because of its location. I almost got married there... It should be better than before, after the repairs. (Hope the insurance man didn't hear me say that.)
 
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Christchurch Boutique Shopping Emporium nearly full


Christchurch’s historic Woolston The Tannery is getting a new lease of life with the announcement today that an old style Boutique Shopping Emporium being built on the site is nearly fully tenanted with high quality fashion and design businesses. Recovery Minister Hon Gerry Brownlee, local people and heritage campaigners were onsite to launch the site, design impressions and celebrate the news of the signing up of the tenants. The brew for a batch of celebration ale that will be served when the first shops open in spring will be started by Mary Shanks, the 1-year-old great- great-great-granddaughter of the original owner, who also the youngest daughter of Alisdair Cassels , the current owner. Hon Gerry Brownlee will be invited to light a heritage lamp that will be incorporated in the Emporium.

The Cassel’s and Sons The Brewery at The Tannery was stage one of the redevelopment and the second stage of the two hectare site may also eventually house a theatre, art studios and heritage displays. Mr Cassels is in discussion with Council staff on the restoration of the original swing bridge and wharf, which were prominent landmarks of the site. Alisdair Cassels, co-owner and visionary for the heritage rebuild and transformation, says the going has been tough but the commitment of locals, and key people including Recovery Minister Gerry Brownlee and ex MP Jim Anderton, has made the development a success. “We’re moving on. It was a hard road but today we’re there. Earthquakes, overzealous demolition advocates and planning rules have finally been cleared. We have a successful business model with a range of fashion, design, and craft businesses for an authentic Victorian facility modernised to connect the past to the future. On behalf of the Cassels I thank everyone who has mucked-in and assisted.”

The Emporium heritage rebuild involves the modernising of the original distinctive Cumnor Terrace buildings built in stages between 1881 and 1924 to 100 percent of the new Building Code and the installation of Fire Sprinklers and Sustainable Heat Recovery systems while carefully retaining the Iconic architecture features using new and recycled materials. The 30 Tenancy Mixed use Retail/ Hospitality /Boutique Shopping Centre will have individual frontages to the exterior with dual entry pedestrian access connected internally via an undercover laneway running through the middle of the Building, serviced by 110 Onsite car parks.
 
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Sir Ian McKellen wizardry for Christchurch theatre


Sir Ian McKellen will exercise his wizardry to raise funds for the repair of Christchurch's historic Isaac Theatre Royal. The British actor, currently in the country to film Sir Peter Jackson's The Hobbit, will take a one-man stage show throughout New Zealand in May and June. He will play in Christchurch's Aurora Centre on June 2. Proceeds will be donated to the earthquake-damaged Isaac Theatre Royal's fundraising campaign to cover the building's $500,000 policy excess and $5.5 million repair costs. McKellen's The Lord of the Rings and Hobbit wizard character, Gandalf, will be in the limelight for the show's first half as the actor discusses how he became involved with the films. He will also hold an audience question-and-answer session.

In the second half, McKellen, one of the most acclaimed Shakesperean actors of his generation, will discuss the plays, films and roles he has been involved with, interrupted by the occasional speech and soliloquy. The show will finish with members of the audience being invited to "play" dead French soldiers while McKellen delivers a stirring final speech. Once the curtain falls, he has indicated, he might stand at the door with a bucket to collect impromptu donations for the Gloucester St building. Signed posters and photos will be on sale.
 
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Mitre Tavern to stand proud again


Work to save one of Lyttelton's few surviving historic hotels has begun. The Mitre Tavern escaped demolition after the February 2011 earthquake despite the loss of several century-old waterfront buildings. The tavern's connection with the Norwich Quay site in Lyttelton dates back to 1849, when Major Alfred Hornbrook opened a sly-grog shop called the Mitre. Owner Tony Ward said yesterday he wanted to save the landmark and would apply for funding for repair and strengthening work. Specialist heritage engineers Miyamoto Cardno would develop the restoration plan. "It'll probably satisfy Cera's [Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority] concerns and put us in a position that we can more carefully analyse and work out the best option for the building.

"Beyond that, we'll need further heritage funding," he said. Strengthening the building beyond the building code was "not a small job", Ward said. "We want to make sure it has a future for another 100 years." His insurance claim had not been settled and community support was needed, he said. A Save the Mitre Tavern Facebook page has been created. "That [community] backing is starting to show its face. They realise they've lost so much and there might only be two or three key buildings they can seriously pursue," Ward said. "There are options for this building and it doesn't have to be lost to the community."
 
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Canterbury Brewery rebuild canned


The Canterbury Brewery site will be sold after its owner decided not to rebuild in central Christchurch. Brewing giant Lion had planned to build a $15 million warehouse on the St Asaph St site but has opted to consolidate its distribution hub in Hornby instead. The earthquake-damaged brewery is being demolished, and the bulk of the Christchurch brewing operation has been moved to the Speight's Brewery in Dunedin. A Lion spokeswoman said the site's inclusion in a proposed health precinct in the Christchurch City Council's central-city plan meant it was not viable to rebuild there.

The site would be rezoned from business to central-city mixed use, she said. "Our facility would most likely not comply with this new zoning." The rezoning was understandable, the spokeswoman said, "given [the site's] proximity to the existing [Christchurch Hospital] and other medical facilities". "We think it is in the best interests of the central city's redevelopment if we establish our warehousing and distribution operations in another, more-compatible location in the city," she said.

Lion would manage the sale and expected to start by June. "There's plenty of detail yet to work through, involving our own internal assessments and valuations," she said. The company has been operating in a reduced capacity from its warehouse on the brewery site and from two distribution facilities owned by logistics partner Linfox. No Lion or Linfox jobs will be lost in the move to Hornby.
 
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Stars come to aid of Court Theatre

International celebrities have come to the aid of the earthquake-stricken Court Theatre. Beyonce, Stephen Fry, Orlando Bloom and Court Theatre fundraising patron Dame Maggie Smith have offered items to be auctioned on Trade Me, including CDs, jewellery and DVDs. Kiwi stars Hayley Westenra, Sir Peter Jackson and Mark Hadlow have also donated items to the auctions, which will start online tomorrow. The Christchurch theatre company was forced to leave its Arts Centre venue after the February 2011 quake, and the auction will help in replacing assets.

Court Theatre chief executive Philip Aldridge said support from the arts community had been overwhelming. "We continue to get phone calls, emails and messages asking 'how can I help?' We hope this auction will help the Court's continued recovery alongside the city," he said. The Court last year opened a $4.6 million theatre inside an old grain store in Addington after an intense fundraising campaign and 112-day build. Aldridge said insurance negotiations had yet to resolve the replacement of items essential to the theatre's survival.
 
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I for one would love to see this ...

Boulevard exhibition considers rich architectural past

The loss of architectural heritage in Christchurch ’s past and present, and consideration for the city’s future are considered in a visually rich outdoor exhibition on Worcester Boulevard. Reconstruction: conversations on a city opens on Worcester Boulevard , between Montreal and Durham Streets from 23 June 2012. It is part of Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu’s Outer Spaces programme. It is also one of the first in a range of Christchurch City Council transitional city projects to be installed within Christchurch ’s Central City. The projects, which were agreed to as part of the draft Central City Recovery Plan are designed to bring new life and people back to the heart of the city, and to help support business.

Curator Ken Hall says that the selection of digitised drawings, photographs, paintings, maps and plans provide a compelling visual account of how the city developed. Tracking the story of Christchurch / Otautahi from its earliest years, the outdoor exhibition examines the city’s foundations, acknowledges loss and demonstrates how different dreams and values have been given form in our built environment. “The level of detail seen in some of the enlarged images in the exhibition is breathtaking, compared to what you might see in the original photographs particularly. I love being able to see the detail and the degree of craft and care that has gone into the design and construction of these buildings. There is further pleasure in seeing into the images - children at play, a person directing traffic, or the text on a poster pasted on the side of a building.

“Walking through the exhibition, it is possible to see the architectural layers of the city, almost in an archaeological way. First, the wooden buildings, then the transition from wood, to brick, to stone. We see for example, through a stunning series of photographs the Canterbury Provincial Council Chambers emerging out of the undulating, swampy tussock land. As a whole, the exhibition presents each of us with an opportunity to build a strong mental imprint of the city’s past. Every person will bring their own memories and attachments to their experience of the exhibition.” Written contributions from a range of local commentators, many of whom are architectural historians are displayed alongside the images. The commentaries raise important questions, says Mr Hall. “We have to ask whether this city can be rebuilt as a place of genuine quality and interest if we undervalue the significance of our rich architectural heritage past.”
 
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Work Begins On Theatre Restoration

More than $500,000 has been raised for the restoration of Christchurch’s earthquake-damaged Isaac Theatre Royal through three special theatre fundraisers in the past two months enabled repair work to finally begin on the 104-year-old heritage theatre. The Hobbit star Sir Ian McKellen performed 15 shows in 11 centres throughout New Zealand in May and June, raising $354,000 from ticket sales, programme sales and donations in exchange for photographs and autographs. Earlier in May, British actor Miriam Margolyes performed a fundraiser in Christchurch raising $10,000, while last week’s Christchurch performance by the Flight of the Conchords added an estimated $125,000 to the restoration pot. Isaac Theatre Royal general manager Neil Cox adds that a personal donation from actor and writer Richard O’Brien brought the total raised to well over $500,000. He said he was astounded by the generosity and the funds raised meant that work on the historic theatre began on Monday with the first stage or restoration of the theatre’s iconic dome.

“What Sir Ian, Miriam, Richard and the Flight of the Conchords’ Bret McKenzie and Jemaine Clement have done has been overwhelming. The last two months touring with Ian McKellen on Stage and seeing the outpouring of support from people around New Zealand has just been incredible.” Ian McKellen says that he’s thoroughly enjoyed the opportunity to create a special show and perform it around the country, opening in “Stratford on Patea” and taking it to audiences in small and large theatres from Auckland to Wanaka, Palmerston North, Tauranga and even Carterton. Highlights of the tour included the opening performance in Stratford’s King’s Theatre with Mastermind winner and Shakespeare expert Ida Gaskin in the audience, being challenged by a seven-year-old wielding Gandalf’s sword in Palmerston North; catching up with Lady June Hillary at the show in Auckland; discovering a long lost cousin in Hawke’s Bay and having a special ring made by the makers of the ‘One Ring’ in Nelson.

The tour finished last weekend with the penultimate sold out show at Wellington’s Opera House with cast members from The Hobbit including Martin Freeman, Richard Armitage, Billy Connolly, James Nesbitt and Aidan Turner in the audience and later joining Sir Ian on stage for the encore and helping gather more than $10,000 in public donations from the collection buckets alone. All the venues on the tour sold quickly meaning that many people missed the opportunity to see a show that will never be staged anywhere else in the world. A Trade Me page will be launched this week to offer the final few hundred show programmes signed by Ian McKellen so that those who missed out can still own something unique to New Zealand and still donate to the fundraising cause. In a recent Wall Street Journal interview, Sir Ian commented: “It is a show absolutely for New Zealand. It is absolutely for Christchurch and for the people who wanted to come along. I like that. I think people have sensed that this is really for us. For me, it’s been a very, very merry thing to do.”

Mr Cox said Sir Ian’s contribution will never be forgotten in Christchurch and in special recognition of his overwhelming generosity, one of the Royal boxes at the restored Isaac Theatre Royal, known as “The Bard’s Box” for its bust of William Shakespeare, will become the Ian McKellen Royal Suite. “It’s been a very special two months. The theatre is one of the few historic buildings in Christchurch to survive the earthquakes and it is wonderful to know it can be rebuilt and serve as a beacon for Canterbury people. To Ian, Richard, Jemaine, Bret and Miriam, our heartfelt thanks and appreciation.” Work to rebuild the Isaac Theatre Royal began at 6am on Monday 2 July when contractors Naylor Love will lower the historic ceiling dome into the stripped-out auditorium to signal the start of a repair and enhancement project that will span 18 months and cost in excess of $28million, funded largely by insurance with fundraising continuing to raise the remainder of the $6million shortfall.

The original and spectacular ceiling dome is famous for its Italianate painting of scenes from Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream and was painted by G.C. Post of the Carrara Ceiling Company of Wellington. It has been a unique highlight of the Theatre Royal's interior since it opened in February 1908. The theatre, with its elaborate fibrous plaster decoration of walls and painted dome, was considered at the time one of the best of its type in the southern hemisphere. Mr Cox said the full repair programme will see the theatre open in a ‘transitional’ format in July 2013 for three months before closing again completely between October 2013 and April 2014 “when ‘the Grand Old Lady’ will finally reopen again in her full restored and upgraded glory”.
 
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Edmonds clock tower to be repaired


A stone clock tower that has marked time on the banks of the Avon River for 83 years is set to be repaired. The Edmonds clock tower, on the corner of Madras St and Oxford Tce, was damaged in the February and June earthquakes last year. However, engineers believe it can be saved. The 1929 clock tower was part of a group of gifts along the Avon from prominent businessman and philanthropist Thomas Edmonds to commemorate the jubilee of his residence in the city. It was designed by Christchurch architect H Francis Willis, who was known for his work in the Art Deco and Spanish Mission styles popular in the 1920s and 30s, such as New Regent St and the Repertory Theatre. It carries a category 2 Historic Places Trust listing and is also listed in the city plan as a building of historic significance. The top section of the clock was removed after the June 2011 quakes to reduce the risk to the public. However, council heritage reinstatement programme manager Rachel Shaw said engineers believed the clock tower could be repaired. The work would cost about $260,000, but would be funded through insurance. Councillors are expected to approve plans to repair the tower when they meet on Thursday.
 
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New arts centre CEO to lead $200m project

An engineer and a planning expert have been appointed to lead a $200 million rebuild of the Christchurch Arts Centre. The Arts Centre Trust Board said yesterday it had appointed former Christchurch man Andre Lovatt as the centre's new chief executive, and Jen Crawford has been elected chairwoman. Lovatt, who graduated from Canterbury University with a bachelor and master's degree in engineering, is working in Singapore as a principal and director of international consulting engineering firm Arup. He will start his new job in October and replace director Ken Franklin, who said in May he was leaving for "personal reasons".

The restoration of the centre will cost more than $200 million and take 15 years. A $35m project to repair the Clock Tower and the Great Hall started in December. Crawford, who has been a member of the trust board since June 2010, is a partner at Anderson Lloyd Lawyers and has 16 years' experience in resource management law. She replaces Cindy Robinson. She said that as well as being an engineer, Lovatt had other skills that would be needed as the board embarked on the rebuild. Crawford said the new position of chief executive was a pivotal role that reflected the need to concentrate on the restoration process. "We wish to return the centre to its former glory," she said.
 
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Rangi Ruru Girls' School's homestead restored


Rangi Ruru Girls' School staff yesterday began moving back into category 2-listed Te Koraha more than a year after the building was extensively damaged in the February 2011 earthquake. The 1886 homestead has undergone significant restoration to bring it up to the new building code. Replacing furnishings proved to be a challenge. Staff had to move everything out of the building after the quake and did not have time to label any boxes. Principal Julie Moor said Te Koraha furniture had been stored in various places around the school. Te Koraha, which sits in the centre of the Merivale school's grounds, had served as a staff and administration centre since 2003. Moor said the quake had strengthened the school community and Te Koraha would now house senior girls as well as staff. The house was built in 1886 by former Christchurch mayor Arthur Rhodes. He and wife Rose Moorhouse held lavish parties that were reported in The Press. Notable guests to the house included Captain Robert Falcon Scott, King George V and Queen Mary.
 
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