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The cost of building a metro is too expensive with our current GDP. This writer did some research and posted a comparative analysis of cost different metro projects in the world. The range from costing $39M/KM to $600M/KM some are fully underground and others partly underground.

I doubt if if have cost justification to build a metro that is underground, our CBD is rather small and not that congested. One can walk from University way to Railway station and board a commuter train without breaking much sweat. We don't need metro crisscrossing in the middle of CBD. Other CBDs emerging like westlands,upperhill are also not densely built up. If we use a conservative figure of $39M per KM to build metro from Nairobi Railway Station to Upperhill/KNH of approx 4KM, it will cost approx 14 Billion shillings.

Algiers recently launched ( a few years back) phase one of their metro of around 9KM only. It costed approx $1B. That is a third of the cost we are using to build Msa-NRB SGR line.

A combination of light rail, light rail and the commuter trails running on the surface is the best way forward, costwise for Nairobi at the moment.

But to focus on light rail as opposed to Metros, looking at Ethiopia as a case study. It cost $475M to construct a 34KM light rail system ( 1/10th of the cost we are using to build SGR line from MSA ro NRB). This is quite affordable and a reachable goal for Nairobi even in the near term. We can have light rail passing through/ terminating at our main CBD and other emerging CBDs in Westlands, Upperhill, Hurligham, Adams, Kilimani, Parklands etc all running above the ground.
 

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The 34km Addis LRT was just too cheap IMO, and Kenya can easily afford it if we were to put our mind to it. Firstly, we already have a Railway reserves running to the
1. North-East (Donholm/ Buruburu/ Dandora/Kayole/ Githurai/ Kahawa/Ruiru/Thika)
2. North-West (Kibera/ Kikuyu)
3. South-East (Syokimau/ Mlolongo/ Athi River).

This reduces the cost even further (concrete, steel columns, demolitions, land compensations etc).

All we need to add are two new lines towards Westlands/Kangemi and Kiambu Road

Why cant we get this done surely? We just lay modern tracks at ground level in the reserves and electrify them, I believe there is enough room to accommodate the electric LRT alongside the main railway lines. If the Addis elevated system cost less than 45b Ksh, ours should ven be cheaper for sure!!

This complemented with the planned BRT bits and pieces, modern interchanges, viaducts etc will surely transform Nairobi into a modern city, encourage people to embrace public transport and reduce the clog.

But then again, who is listening?:eek:hno::eek:hno::eek:hno:
 

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The 34km Addis LRT was just too cheap IMO, and Kenya can easily afford it if we were to put our mind to it. Firstly, we already have a Railway reserves running to the
1. North-East (Donholm/ Buruburu/ Dandora/Kayole/ Githurai/ Kahawa/Ruiru/Thika)
2. North-West (Kibera/ Kikuyu)
3. South-East (Syokimau/ Mlolongo/ Athi River).

This reduces the cost even further (concrete, steel columns, demolitions, land compensations etc).

All we need to add are two new lines towards Westlands/Kangemi and Kiambu Road

Why cant we get this done surely? We just lay modern tracks at ground level in the reserves and electrify them, I believe there is enough room to accommodate the electric LRT alongside the main railway lines. If the Addis elevated system cost less than 45b Ksh, ours should ven be cheaper for sure!!

This complemented with the planned BRT bits and pieces, modern interchanges, viaducts etc will surely transform Nairobi into a modern city, encourage people to embrace public transport and reduce the clog.

But then again, who is listening?:eek:hno::eek:hno::eek:hno:
You can at least go to @TransportKe twitter page and use #NairobiTraffic hashtag to give your suggestions. They have invited KOT to speak out though I wonder if it will be of any use.
 

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Cost can and will be an issue for a city wanting to develop a rail transit system.

Personally, I'd be willing to wait until the population of the Nairobi area surpassed 5 million for plans to develop a rail transit system are announced.

Why light rail may not be enough in the long-term: Over the next few decades, Nairobi's CBDs could become more dense, and if a light-rail (or premetro) system were indeed developed in the area, it'd have to be rebooted into a full metro some time later. You'd have to grade-separate the tracks, eliminate all level crossings, and expand the station platforms (like, from 60 metres to 140 metres).

An example: The median of a section of Mombasa Road is less than 20 metres (65 feet), which I think would be wide enough for rail transit tracks and stations.

A combination of light rail, light rail and the commuter trails running on the surface is the best way forward, costwise for Nairobi at the moment.
You said "light rail" twice in this sentence. Redundant.
 

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You can at least go to @TransportKe twitter page and use #NairobiTraffic hashtag to give your suggestions. They have invited KOT to speak out though I wonder if it will be of any use.
KOT should be vocal bout traffic in nairobi!we should demand LRT and roads!I guess if guys were persistent enough for just one week and demand uhurus response,we can get it.Problem is im not on tweeter.sleekpiano pursue this suggestions and have guys push it on tweeter.tumia Larry madondo to hype this so that we can get the attention of gok.Is there anyone on here that has acess to the big fish?
 

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KOT should be vocal bout traffic in nairobi!we should demand LRT and roads!I guess if guys were persistent enough for just one week and demand uhurus response,we can get it.Problem is im not on tweeter.sleekpiano pursue this suggestions and have guys push it on tweeter.tumia Larry madondo to hype this so that we can get the attention of gok.Is there anyone on here that has acess to the big fish?
Wow, thats a bad excuse! its easy to join twitter
 

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I believe this document may give an idea on what Nairobi's first metro line may look like. On the map (which is on Page 7-53), blue lines are BRT corridors, red lines are light rail corridors, and green lines are metro corridors.

There are nine corridors of this supposed Mass Rapid Transit System: Jogoo, Juja, Langata, Limuru, Mombasa, Ngong, Outer Ring Road, Thika, and Waiyaki Way. The lines coloured green are the Ngong Corridor from Dagoretti Corridor to the CBD, the Juja Corridor from the CBD to Ruai, and the Thika Corridor from the CBD to Ruiru.

The first east-west line of any Nairobi Metro system would benefit both the CBD and Upper Hill, while the first North South line would benefit the CBD and Westlands.

The development of underground stations and tracks will mean demolition of some buildings within the Nairobi CBD, and a simple cut-and-cover may be impossible in some areas, like most of the A104 Highway. Also, the right-of-way for a new elevated metro line is around 25 to 30 metres wide. In either case, land acquisition for any metro can't be avoided entirely. And on Mombasa Road, the short roads on which a motorist can switch from one carriageway to the other (there are several of those) are going to be removed for a metro line, or even a BRT line. Plus, the names of the potential stations can't even be read clearly on the map.
 

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^^
One of the best-proposed plannings I've read for Nairobi in a while. If properly executed this city will truly be a beacon.
 

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Great master plan peovided for free by Jica. Hope we can get some visionary leader /performer in ministry of transport $ infrastructure. If only we can get things right.
Something that comes out strong is that railway city is core and innevitable!! With the big 4 housing agenda, the city looks like a low hanging fruit..ie readily available land for highrise residential homes. We should have had some ground breaking by now if we are to achieve half a million homes target
 

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About that east-west line, which corridor should be constructed first? Jogoo (north of Moi Air Base) or Juja (south of Moi Air Base)? And as for the north-south line, which would obviously use the Mombasa Corridor, should it use the Waiyaki Way corridor or the Limuru corridor? I'm kinda leaning towards Limiru.
 

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Nairobi really needs to wake up when it comes to mass transit systems.Other cities in Africa are proving more visionary .
.

The city of Douala (Cameroon) will soon have its Tramway (Light Rail),
which will have a length of 18 km, and will be built by
a Belgo-Turkish consortium
and part of this line will open in 2021
Agreed on mass transit but I personally don't think light rail is the way to go for Nairobi.Light rail for a city as big as Nairobi would only be good to fill up uncovered corridors in an existing high capacity metro/subway system

Washington DC (metro area) which has roughly the same population as Nairobi there's a subway system supplemented by light rail for different neighborhoods not directly connected by the metro lines.

Light rail by itself, IMO is a joke considering the low capacities involved. it would end up being a token project just for the appearance of development but not solving any transport needs.My thinking its much better to go for a proper metro system supplemented by a proper bus service network.











^^ These are pics I took recently of a new light rail corridor in DC 's 'H Street Corridor' which runs along neighborhoods not covered by the city's subway system and even for this few neighborhoods most people find it to be a joke, because its relatively slow and the capacity is too low.

 

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^^ light rail is an effective solution u just have to look at literally any other place than the US
Even in the US, there are a number of major cities that have implemented a light rail system that provides real transit capacity throughput. Boston runs the busiest light rail network in the US (mainly concentrated to the west of the city). Granted this is supplemented by a subway/BRT/extended bus network, but it's adequate for the neighborhoods it serves.

@kenyan_yungin is partly right though.. Nairobi will need to implement different transit options for the different corridors based on population density.
 

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^^ That's the point, I don't think it's bad it's just not effective if it's used as a standalone solution for a big city .Its great as a supplementary mode.

Much rather go for a high capacity metro system first which is more expensive but way more effective.
 

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^^ That's the point, I don't think it's bad it's just not effective if it's used as a standalone solution for a big city .Its great as a supplementary mode.

Much rather go for a high capacity metro system first which is more expensive but way more effective.
High capacity and efficient systems would sound the death knell to the matatu and boda boda industry which currently employs hundreds of thousands who in turn support millions of dependents.

Where would all these idle people go? My hope is that the special economic zones will start absorbing hundreds of thousands of youths away from matatu and boda boda and defuse the unemployment time bomb.

Once we have some sort of industrial revolution going kicked off by the special economic zones, I think only then can we start looking at the prohibitively expensive underground metro systems.
 

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High capacity and efficient systems would sound the death knell to the matatu and boda boda industry which currently employs hundreds of thousands who in turn support millions of dependents.

Where would all these idle people go? My hope is that the special economic zones will start absorbing hundreds of thousands of youths away from matatu and boda boda and defuse the unemployment time bomb.

Once we have some sort of industrial revolution going kicked off by the special economic zones, I think only then can we start looking at the prohibitively expensive underground metro systems.
Industries adapt and govt policy can guide that.

Construction of a metro wouldn't be overnight so before construction starts, a ban on importation of buses/mini buses should be in place .By the time construction is done, there'll be fewer psvs on the road which can be taken care of by a guaranteed buy back from the govt.
 
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