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As gas prices are getting higher and higher are the American cites ready with public transportation? There are only a very few cities in the USA that you can live with out a car. I do not know a state that is prepare like the European countries.

North Carolina is the just a bit larger than England, but our public transportation is poor compare to England. Charlotte has the best public transportation system in the state, but it is nothing compared to European cities of its size.

Here in America, the car is king. I hear that gas may go for as much as $10.00 a gallon. At $10.00 a gallon many people will look for another way to get around. What is here that we may use to get around in our cities today?

What is your city and state doing now?
 

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The car is the king in Europe, too... Yes, the public transportation systems there are definitely ahead of ours, but people love their cars in Europe and continue to drive them... Even in my hometown, in Greece, the cars still rule. Will our country improve its public transit as a result of high gasoline prices? Maybe, but I think it will be a combination of gas prices and the deisre to live a more urban life.

Just my 2 cents...
 

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Don't forget that in the long term crude oil prices will continue to rise until drivers are forced to drive less, and that global oil output will continue on a long, slow, decline.

Hybrids and electric cars will only delay this process, since we'll probably see power shortages soon.

Sprawling cities could start resembling Paris: a dense and prestigious core, with the more desirable suburbs along railway lines. What are now McMansions can very quickly become ghettos like Clichy-sous-bois.

Bottom line is, our car culture is fu cked.
 

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some stuff

Here in the Seattle Metro area, gas prices vary. It's over $4.05 in most places in Seattle (at least that I've seen). In Tacoma, there are a handful of spots still under $3.90 (3 I know of are $3.83) and several just under $4. I only know 2 stations in town over $4.

They've been doing a lot with Sound Transit, which is a regional transit authority (covers basically Olympia to Everett). There is the train as well as the still incomplete light rail.
Only thing is, most of the transit solutions we have are bus. Now while that's fine and dandy, they still use Diesel (or Natural Gas down here in Tacoma). The stumbling block here simply is the sprawl and infrastructure is heavily car dependent. It's completely impractical to bus from Tacoma to Maple Valley or Olympia to Shoreline... which is of course a function of all this sprawl.
Something has to be done to re-engineer our cities to be more pedestrian/bike/train/streetcar oriented or else it's gonna be brutal.

2 things I have noticed going on in response.
1) I'm seeing a LOT more motorcycles, mopeds and bikes on the road... even in the famous Washington rain.
2) Starting to see people moving in to the core cities from the burbs. I suspect this trend will accelerate as prices climb.
 

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I'm originally from North Carolina too. Every time I come back to my hometown Greenville I see that the development is strong. I find myself looking to see how much the population has changed since the last time I came. Right now Greenville is sitting at 75, 000, East Carolina University now has 25, 000 students! However, as typical the development is strong but seemingly behind the sustainable paradigm. All the land uses are disconnected and a sea of parking lots surrounds everything. Farmland and forests are cemented over with single family home neighborhoods with charming names, apartment complexes with hundreds of units, and then the typical single story shopping center, and single story office park. Hopefully, plans will be made to make it a little more dense in the future.

I was just looking at another thread about Columbia, Maryland, talking about 6,000 new apartment units coming to the city. Wikipedia shows that Columbia (27 sq miles) and Greenville (26 sq miles) are essentially the same size geographically. However, Columbia has 100,000 residents versus Greenville's 75,000. Imagine if Greenville took some better plans to make mixed use development sites (nodes) with residential and office or retail along with some open space/recreation at these sites. Three or four sites like that could easily squeeze 25,000. I understand everyone doesn't want to be in an apartment, but the plans could be better for sure. Right now everything is just sparse and disconnected, and Greenville is supposed to be the "Emerald City". Columbia is obviously a different place, but there needs to be some changes in Greenville and North Carolina cities in general......cause that 10 millionth resident is not far over the horizon.....then just wait what traffic and sprawl will do to this state without mass transit and more sustainable developments.........That invisible hand of potential $10 gas seems to be the only thing that might get politicians and citizens upset enough and ready to make a transformation to that idyllic European density paradigm.
 
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