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Sh150 billion set aside for Nithi dam
Nairobi Star
12 October 2011​
150 billion is alot of money, is it a grant or a loan? I would have been the first to celebrate the project but because it is based on mt kenya catchment area i wont. I know how bad it feels when we are told there will be rationing because the rains failed this year.
 

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It's admirable that the near-bankrupt state of Italy still manages to find money for such a project, but for Kenya, this is good news.

I would assume that all or most of the money from Japan and Italy comes as grants, while the AfDB and the Arab Development Bank are lenders. Whether GOK is printing new money for this, or borrowing in the market is unknown to me, but given the situation, and the likeliness of a high return on investment, printing fresh money with a long payback time is defensible.

I would guess that between 33% and 50% is a grant. It may not be wired directly in to purchase local currency, and it will almost certainly be paid out in tranches, but an amount of $500m-$750m will, in addition to the job creation effect, almost certainly contribute to a dearly needed strengthening of the shilling!

I am disappointed that neither the article, nor anything that can be found online, states the generating capacity of this dam. All we know, is that since it's the second-largest in Africa, it will have a generating capacity of anywhere between 500MW (Gibe III) and 2100 MW (Aswan).

In any case, it is still only a small step towards what Kenya needs to achieve the Vision 2030, but it's a good step nevertheless.
 

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All we know, is that since it's the second-largest in Africa, it will have a generating capacity of anywhere between 500MW (Gibe III) .
Gibe III generating capacity is 1870 MW out of this what Ethiopia plan to sell to Kenya is 500 MW.
After correcting that I think this is a good news for Kenya since you guys are suffering the power shedding like us in Ethiopia.
 

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Gibe III generating capacity is 1870 MW out of this what Ethiopia plan to sell to Kenya is 500 MW.
After correcting that I think this is a good news for Kenya since you guys are suffering the power shedding like us in Ethiopia.
In that case, this is brilliant news. Kenya's current generating capacity stands at roughly 1050 MW, although that figure is going to increase rapidly in the years to come. The Vision 2030 milestone for 2018 is 3000 MW, and with this project, we are already close.

This alone is peanuts compared to the 15000 MW (I think that's the target) envisioned for 2030, though.

Personally, I believe even that is modest. All modern economies are highly energy-intensive, and the cheaper and more abundant the energy, the stronger the competitiveness and growth potential.

Vision 2030 is a good document, but Kenya is already ahead of the progression plan on several points (100% electrification currently likely to be reached by 2023, 7 years ahead of the plan). It is time already now to start thinking of the next step, after 2030, beyond the newly industrialized, middle-income country status.

Anyone knows when the Nithi Dam is scheduled to start feeding in to the grid, by the way?
 

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I suspect that this project will take awhile to get up and running. It is projected that 30,000 people will be displaced by the dam and I am certain many will not go quietly. The Sondu Miriu project was delayed by many years (even after construction commenced) because of, among other things, lawsuits and opposition from some groups.

In that case, this is brilliant news. Kenya's current generating capacity stands at roughly 1050 MW, although that figure is going to increase rapidly in the years to come. The Vision 2030 milestone for 2018 is 3000 MW, and with this project, we are already close.

This alone is peanuts compared to the 15000 MW (I think that's the target) envisioned for 2030, though.

Personally, I believe even that is modest. All modern economies are highly energy-intensive, and the cheaper and more abundant the energy, the stronger the competitiveness and growth potential.

Vision 2030 is a good document, but Kenya is already ahead of the progression plan on several points (100% electrification currently likely to be reached by 2023, 7 years ahead of the plan). It is time already now to start thinking of the next step, after 2030, beyond the newly industrialized, middle-income country status.

Anyone knows when the Nithi Dam is scheduled to start feeding in to the grid, by the way?
 

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The closest thing I can find on the internet is this one being referred to as High Grand Falls (HGF). The relevant sections begin on page 8 of the Pdf.

http://www.regional-dev.go.ke/images/magazine.pdf



It's admirable that the near-bankrupt state of Italy still manages to find money for such a project, but for Kenya, this is good news.

I would assume that all or most of the money from Japan and Italy comes as grants, while the AfDB and the Arab Development Bank are lenders. Whether GOK is printing new money for this, or borrowing in the market is unknown to me, but given the situation, and the likeliness of a high return on investment, printing fresh money with a long payback time is defensible.

I would guess that between 33% and 50% is a grant. It may not be wired directly in to purchase local currency, and it will almost certainly be paid out in tranches, but an amount of $500m-$750m will, in addition to the job creation effect, almost certainly contribute to a dearly needed strengthening of the shilling!

I am disappointed that neither the article, nor anything that can be found online, states the generating capacity of this dam. All we know, is that since it's the second-largest in Africa, it will have a generating capacity of anywhere between 500MW (Gibe III) and 2100 MW (Aswan).

In any case, it is still only a small step towards what Kenya needs to achieve the Vision 2030, but it's a good step nevertheless.
 

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SE9 change the title to "High Grand Falls Dam" which will be Kenya's largest dam and will create Kenya's largest freshwater lake that will provide waters to the area's around tana river..

Kenya’s largest fresh water dam

Construction of Kenya’s biggest dam is set to start soon along River Tana. The proposed Sh150 billion High Grand Falls Dam will be the single largest undertaking by the government in the water sector and will supply water to the Lamu resort city and port.

The 165 square kilometre dam will also be used to generate between 500MW and 700MW of electricity and help to control flooding in the Tana delta that displaces thousands of people every year.

Its construction will be funded through a public private partnership with firms from the People’s Republic of China and the Export-Import Bank of China providing the finances.

“A feasibility study and a detailed design of the High Grand Falls Dam on Tana River is now complete and work will commence any time now,” the outgoing permanent secretary in the Ministry of Water, Mr David Stower, told Smart Company during a dam inspection tour in Koibatek District, Baringo County.

The proposed dam will hold over 5.6 billion cubic metres of water and will border three counties — Tharaka Nithi, Kitui, and Tana.

“Apart from generation of electricity, the massive water in the dam will be used to irrigate more than 200,000 acres of land. This will go a long way in boosting food production in the country,” Mr Stower said.

The High Grand Falls Dam is part of the Sh1.5 trillion Lamu Port and Lamu Southern Sudan-Ethiopia Transport Corridor (Lapsset), which was officially launched in March last year at the Lamu Port by then President Mwai Kibaki at a ceremony attended by the President of the Republic of South Sudan, Mr Salva Kiir, and former Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi, who has since died.

“We want it as a critical success factor of the Lapsset project,” said the Lapsset Corridor Development Authority chief executive, Mr Silvester Kasuku.

Previously undertaken by the Ministry of Regional Development, the project will now shift to the Ministry of Environment, Water and Natural Resources headed by Prof Judy Wakhungu.

“The benefit to the region is enormous,” said Mr Carey Orege, the acting principal secretary in the Ministry of Environment, Water and Natural Resources. “First, it is going to form a small lake, introducing fishing to the communities around it, and tourism.”

According to Mr Orege, the National Treasury has forwarded the financing request to the Chinese Government, which has forwarded the proposal to the China Exim Bank.

All terms, apart from two technical issues, have been agreed. Negotiations on these are ongoing. The dam’s construction will begin at Marimanti in Tharaka Nithi, which will act as the coordination and site office. Tseukuru in Kitui County will form the coordination and site office for the resettlement programme.

The biggest beneficiaries in terms of transport will be the residents of Kibwezi, whose journey to Isiolo will be reduced by more than 100 kilometres.

Isiolo is planned to become a resort city, housing an oil refinery, railway station, and road connecting Kenya to Ethiopia and South Sudan. Overall, the bridge will save the economy at least Sh23.4 billion.

The saving comes as result of the dam eliminating the need to build a new bridge across the Tana River and also shortening the travel distance, currently by road, to the two counties.

Construction is expected to take six years, with at least 4,500 households affected. Already, the government has completed the resettlement plan, which will see 3,000 households relocated.

“While construction of the dam is the financier’s responsibility, resettlement will be the government’s duty. As a ministry, we have done our financial request to the Treasury,” said Mr Orege.

Each of the households is expected to get at least a two-bedroom permanent house with land matching what they had before resettlement. The ministry says the aim is to leave them better off than they were before relocation.



http://www.nation.co.ke/Features/sm.../1226/1871014/-/item/0/-/jxds2xz/-/index.html
 
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Financing has shifted from AfDB to Exim Bank, we are not out of the woods yet
 

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In that case, this is brilliant news. Kenya's current generating capacity stands at roughly 1050 MW, although that figure is going to increase rapidly in the years to come. The Vision 2030 milestone for 2018 is 3000 MW, and with this project, we are already close.

This alone is peanuts compared to the 15000 MW (I think that's the target) envisioned for 2030, though.

Personally, I believe even that is modest. All modern economies are highly energy-intensive, and the cheaper and more abundant the energy, the stronger the competitiveness and growth potential.

Vision 2030 is a good document, but Kenya is already ahead of the progression plan on several points (100% electrification currently likely to be reached by 2023, 7 years ahead of the plan). It is time already now to start thinking of the next step, after 2030, beyond the newly industrialized, middle-income country status.

Anyone knows when the Nithi Dam is scheduled to start feeding in to the grid, by the way?
Thats highly ambitious- Ghana started its mass electrification programme 2 decades ago and is still only on 70% which is way ahead of Kenya. Even Ghana wont have universal access by 2023. In any case, it will be impossible for most African nations due to isolated villages and huts- expect a levelling off figure of around 90-95% (which would still classify as universal coverage) which will VERY VERY slowly reach 100%
 

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who will finance for this project?
I'm completely lost about this project. In which public documents does it appear? When was it planned? Were these funds factored in any budget, when? I'm an optimist but some things seem too good to be true sometimes. See like LAPSSET, how far have we gone since its launch? Who is talking of any pipeline , railway, airport, road designs since its launch? Big great news with little to show for it?
 

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It's quite amazing that I never heard of this project before. It's a brilliant initiative. The next target area should be Nyanza & Western where thousands are affected by floods every year and yet you hear of mini droughts & the lack of electricity. I think Kenya can be self sufficient in power generation and food supply if the right policies are put into place. But like I said before, it will also require the full participation (willingly) of the local residents to make projects like this one a reality.
 

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700MW is just too little for the 2nd largest dam in africa. Dams like kabora basa, aswan, volta and that in ethiopia i think called Guba (6000MW) are must more productive. Govt please use our money better.
 

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Biggest Hydro Electric Project in Africa

A Few things to keep in mind when talking about Hydro Electric Dams.

I, like some above wondered how a 700MW could be Africa's second largest. It is just too small. Here are just a few I quickly looked up in less than 2 minutes

Aswan Egypt Nile 2,100 MW
Cahora Bassa Mozambique Zambezi 2,025 MW
Ingula Pumped Storage Scheme KwaZulu-Natal 1,332 MW
Kariba Power Station Zimbabwe 1,320 MW
Drakensberg Pumped Storage Scheme South Africa 1,000 MW

Ethiopia's Dam (The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam) Now under construction will become the biggest hydro-electric power station in Africa. The $4.2 billion dam which, when finished will have the capacity to produce 6,000 megawatts of electricity. Ethiopia's national electricity corporation says potential buyers of Ethiopia's electricity will include the two Sudans, Kenya, Djibouti, Somalia, Uganda and even Egypt (even though Egypt is not happy about the Dam)

Now if Congo ever, and the key word here is "Ever" puts her act together, they will own the title of not only the Biggest Hydro Electric dam in Africa but the world.

Caution, They have had these plans since the 70's but they have slowly started putting together financiers to see if the project can take off.

The Grand Inga Hydroelectric Project would have an astonishing capacity of 40,000 MW. That's twice as much as the Three Gorges dam in China, currently the world's largest hydro project.


If Congo can pull it off, that would harness sub-Saharan Africa's greatest river and light up half of the continent.

Now compare just those two to the proposed 700mw and it looks like child's play. Now in Geothermal I think Kenya can become a real player.

That may be one of the reasons why Uhuru Kenyatta made a stop over in DRC on his way back from Nigeria. Just speculation on my part :) There are many other reason why he could have been there.



Grand Inga Hydroelectric Project

 

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Corruption rares its ugly head again. This project is now on hold.

http://www.nation.co.ke/business/ne...spended/-/1006/1968064/-/rm9ll4z/-/index.html

By CHARLES WANYORO
More by this Author
Construction of the Kenya’s biggest dam has been suspended due to corruption allegations.

Deputy President William Ruto said there had been suspicion that a group of individuals who were supposed to implement the Sh100 billion High Grand Falls dam which would have covered Tharaka-Nithi, Kitui and Tana-River counties had diverted some of the money and were asking for more.

Speaking at Chuka University grounds during a thanksgiving service for Chuka-Igambang’ombe legislator Muthomi Njuki, Mr Ruto said the government would appraise the project afresh before a new start date is announced.

The planned dam would produce 700 megawatts of electricity and provide water to irrigate over 250,000 acres of land besides supplying water to the Lamu resort city and port.

PERENNIAL FLOODING

Mr Ruto said the 165-kilometre dam which will hold over 5.6 billion cubic metres of water will help check the perennial flooding in Tana delta which has been displacing thousands of residents when the river breaks its banks.

“We detected that there were some elements of graft involved in the project. The people who were handling it were not straight forward,” said Mr Ruto.
The project was to be funded through a public-private partnership with firms from the People’s Republic of China and the Export-Import Bank of China providing the finances.

Mr Njuki said area leaders had been informed that some people had inflated the amount needed to implement the project in a move suspected to be an effort to siphon cash.

“The people handling it inflated the cost of the project. The donors said it would cost $1 million but they asked for $1.7 million. The government stopped it to conduct further assessment,” he said.

The legislator said the project would have immensely benefited the largely semi-arid county through irrigation projects started through revenue remitted by the national government.

“You have seen how tourists flock to Masinga dam which is very small compared to the High Grand Falls Dam. We are optimistic that it would be built soon,” he said.

The High Grand Falls Dam is part of the Sh1.5 trillion Lamu Port and Lamu Southern Sudan-Ethiopia Transport Corridor (Lapsset), which was officially launched in March last year at the Lamu Port by former President Mwai Kibaki at a ceremony attended by the President of the Republic of South Sudan, Mr Salva Kiir, and former Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi who has since died.
 

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Corruption! People want to eat!

The fat pigs have to get their share before the public is fed... business as usual - Kenyan style...

Its sounds like a pretty expensive venture! I hope we are getting the most bang for the money.

1.5B USD is not pocket change by no means...

Given that it sounds like most of the $ will be donated, I believe it will be a good invested for KE. I hope the output can be higher though...
 

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Kenya is in talks with China, seeking funds to finance construction of the country’s giant dam, six months after halting work on the project due to cost exaggeration claims.

According to a senior official in the Ministry of Environment Water and Natural Resources, the project is only waiting for funds.

“An updated, detailed design of the High Grand Falls Dam on Tana River is now complete and work will commence if the Treasury succeeds in ongoing negotiations with China,” said director of water resources, Mr John Nyaoro.

Revised project plans seen by SmartCompany put the estimated cost of construction at Sh148 billion, the cash that is being sought as a loan from China.
“If China shall not be able to fund it in full, we shall embark on a public-private partnership,” said Mr Nyaoro.

A detailed report on the project by the Regional Development Authority was finalised on January 8, following an executive order mid-last year to halt the process for further assessment, said Mr Nyaoro.

Deputy President William Ruto said there had been suspicion that some individuals implementing the Sh150 billion project were asking for money that was much more than the cost: “We detected that there were some elements of graft involved in the project. The people who were handling it were not straight forward,” said Mr Ruto in Chuka.

The 96-kilometre square High Grand Falls Dam will border Tharaka-Nithi, Kitui and Tana-River counties and is to be built at Kivuka along Tana River.

The dam is part of the Sh1.5 trillion Lamu Port and Lamu Southern Sudan-Ethiopia Transport corridor launched in 2012. It would supply water to the proposed Lamu resort city and port while generating between 500MW and 700MW of electricity
http://www.nation.co.ke/lifestyle/s...ld-dam-/-/1226/2153756/-/5p26v4z/-/index.html

 
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