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San Francisco removed their double decks, Seattle just recently removed theirs, now we're erecting them. As if the spirit of the Alaskan Way wafted through the pacific and reincarnate in KL. Hope I'll be living when it's their turn to get torn down.
 

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^^

Most probably the proposed PIL 1 highways under PTMP when completed would look like these loor !!!

:cheers:
this One ke?



Does anyone have the route map of the Damansara-Bangsar elevated highway?

I can't seem to find it
there's a Damansara bangsar highway?
 

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San Francisco removed their double decks, Seattle just recently removed theirs, now we're erecting them. As if the spirit of the Alaskan Way wafted through the pacific and reincarnate in KL. Hope I'll be living when it's their turn to get torn down.
Could it be because those places are in active earthquake zones? I don't think they wanted a repeat of the collapsed highways at Oakland in the late 80's and Kobe, Japan in mid-90's happening again.
 

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Could it be because those places are in active earthquake zones? I don't think they wanted a repeat of the collapsed highways at Oakland in the late 80's and Kobe, Japan in mid-90's happening again.
From what I can read about the removed elevated highways, it is less about them prone to collapse in earthquake and more about them already being unpopular by the time of their demise.

Proposals to remove Embarcadero Freeway surfaced as early as 1963, and SF Board of Supervisors voted to demolish it in 1985, but the demolition was opposed by the nearby Chinatown communities and the 1987 vote was defeated. After Loma Prieta earthquake, Art Agnos, SF's mayor at the time, once again proposed for the Embarcadero Freeway to be removed "in favor of a boulevard with an underpass at the Ferry Building to allow for a large plaza." Long story short, the motion to remove the freeway passed, and the mayor paid a high political cost for it, losing Chinatown's support for his re-election. It should also be noted that California State Route 480, of which Embarcadero Freeway was part of, was subjected to highway revolt, and portions of the highway was never built as a result, and was deleted from CA Streets and Highway Code.

And that's not the only highway that has been removed for urban renewal: Cheonggyecheon in Seoul removed a highway in 2005 and in it place now stands a large public recreation space, and it actually has sped up traffic around the city when the highway was removed. This is now often cited as one of the examples of Braess's Paradox.
 

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Corellian YT-1300
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That's why I salute Singapore's building of the Marina Coastal Expressway, which is easily the longest underground drive I've had in recent times (even if it cost a hefty SGD4.1b)... Due to the building of tunnel freeways that stretch more than 5km under the busy Downtown Core and Marina Bay, all the way towards Kallang in the east...

If only the AKLEH or DASH had such underground portions, we wouldn't have to see multiple viaducts and pillars all over the place - notably that "spaghetti junction" above the LDP and near Empire City / Damansara Perdana! :nuts: :eek:hno:
 

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guess beauty is in the eye of the beholder.I'll admit that I have a fetish for all of all these crazy multi story viaducts structure.

but I do agree that demolishing expressway that got build in between the city and their water feature is a great idea for urban rejuvenation,

top of my list for expressway that need to be torn down is
1) akleh in-between jln Tun Razak And jln sultan Ismail,
2)jln Kinabalu
3)jln Syed Putra
 

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From what I can read about the removed elevated highways, it is less about them prone to collapse in earthquake and more about them already being unpopular by the time of their demise.

Proposals to remove Embarcadero Freeway surfaced as early as 1963, and SF Board of Supervisors voted to demolish it in 1985, but the demolition was opposed by the nearby Chinatown communities and the 1987 vote was defeated. After Loma Prieta earthquake, Art Agnos, SF's mayor at the time, once again proposed for the Embarcadero Freeway to be removed "in favor of a boulevard with an underpass at the Ferry Building to allow for a large plaza." Long story short, the motion to remove the freeway passed, and the mayor paid a high political cost for it, losing Chinatown's support for his re-election. It should also be noted that California State Route 480, of which Embarcadero Freeway was part of, was subjected to highway revolt, and portions of the highway was never built as a result, and was deleted from CA Streets and Highway Code.

And that's not the only highway that has been removed for urban renewal: Cheonggyecheon in Seoul removed a highway in 2005 and in it place now stands a large public recreation space, and it actually has sped up traffic around the city when the highway was removed. This is now often cited as one of the examples of Braess's Paradox.
There's also quite a recent case in pakistan where they tore down a motorway, tho I'm quite sure that's more due to political pork barreling than anything else
 

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That's why I salute Singapore's building of the Marina Coastal Expressway, which is easily the longest underground drive I've had in recent times (even if it cost a hefty SGD4.1b)... Due to the building of tunnel freeways that stretch more than 5km under the busy Downtown Core and Marina Bay, all the way towards Kallang in the east...

If only the AKLEH or DASH had such underground portions, we wouldn't have to see multiple viaducts and pillars all over the place - notably that "spaghetti junction" above the LDP and near Empire City / Damansara Perdana! :nuts: :eek:hno:
Problem is we have unstable limestone bedrocks beneath a large portion of KL. I think it will be too expensive to build, to put in extra safety features and to maintain, for the tunnels to function well.

Personally, I don't mind these viaducts and flyovers for they have their own engineering beauty. I love tunnels too for the same reason but I think we have to be pragmatic that sometimes aesthetics have to take a backseat to practicality.
 

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From what I can read about the removed elevated highways, it is less about them prone to collapse in earthquake and more about them already being unpopular by the time of their demise.

Proposals to remove Embarcadero Freeway surfaced as early as 1963, and SF Board of Supervisors voted to demolish it in 1985, but the demolition was opposed by the nearby Chinatown communities and the 1987 vote was defeated. After Loma Prieta earthquake, Art Agnos, SF's mayor at the time, once again proposed for the Embarcadero Freeway to be removed "in favor of a boulevard with an underpass at the Ferry Building to allow for a large plaza." Long story short, the motion to remove the freeway passed, and the mayor paid a high political cost for it, losing Chinatown's support for his re-election. It should also be noted that California State Route 480, of which Embarcadero Freeway was part of, was subjected to highway revolt, and portions of the highway was never built as a result, and was deleted from CA Streets and Highway Code.

And that's not the only highway that has been removed for urban renewal: Cheonggyecheon in Seoul removed a highway in 2005 and in it place now stands a large public recreation space, and it actually has sped up traffic around the city when the highway was removed. This is now often cited as one of the examples of Braess's Paradox.
I was just referring to practical reasons, why safety is a factor in the two cities you mentioned previously.

In all places, removing and building highways are part of the constant evolution of the cities' growth. NIMBYism, property values and political forces are all factors playing a role in urban renewals.

Cheonggyecheon you cited happens to work for Seoul but I personally find it unappealing. I do realize that it benefits the city, so that means no matter how I feel about it, if it's good for the majority I can live with that. For comparison, look up the similar High Line in NYC. It's generally a success but there are also issues with it.

Just because some cities decided to make do without their highways we shouldn't follow suit without considering the local contextual metrics. The same thing with constructing them. If there are places with multi-tiers interchanges, doesn't mean we too must have the same unless it is necessary.

So no, I can't agree with you on this matter of not having such roadways because other cities are doing it. Conditions are different and unique for each place.
 

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Honestly, if they wanna build tunnels all throughout KL, I'd rather it be for trains than cars since I think it can help move more people. Personally, I don't like driving in tunnels. It's not claustrophobia but it's just not as stimulating as driving and seeing KL in all its glory. I can't imagine now what it feels like driving on the SUKE when it opens. It has be a quite a sight.
 

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guess beauty is in the eye of the beholder.I'll admit that I have a fetish for all of all these crazy multi story viaducts structure.

but I do agree that demolishing expressway that got build in between the city and their water feature is a great idea for urban rejuvenation,

top of my list for expressway that need to be torn down is
1) akleh in-between jln Tun Razak And jln sultan Ismail,
2)jln Kinabalu
3)jln Syed Putra
I want them to realign MRR2 near Batu Caves. This is a world attraction and we have an elevated highway flying right next to it. Really ruining the look of the place.

By yeah, I agree strongly on the 3 roads you mentioned.
 

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Home / Sabah News
Authority urged to repair potholes in Tawau
Published on: Monday, March 09, 2020



TAWAU: Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) Tawau Public Complaint Bureau member Lu Ting Hong urged the authority to repair potholes along the Jalan Megah 9 road at Taman Megah Jaya as its deplorable condition is causing much inconvenience to users.

Lu said a complainant also informed that the road was flooded every time it rained, which caused damage to the road.

“The pothole-riddled road irks the residents, business operators and road users and they want the authority to fix the road as soon as possible.”

Lu also criticised the authority for spending huge cost in refurbishing the basketball court at Taman Megah Jaya instead of using the funds to maintain the road.

He added that the road junction was flooded during downpour or when it rained a little longer, rendering the road impassable to smaller vehicles.
http://www.dailyexpress.com.my/news/148476/authority-urged-to-repair-potholes-in-tawau-/
 
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