SkyscraperCity Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,004 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Ras El Tin Palace

Ras El Tin Palace is a palace on the coast of the Mediterranean Sea in Alexandria, Egypt. It is one of the official residences for a serving President of Egypt. Under the Muhammad Ali Dynasty of Egypt and Sudan, it was a royal palace. Ras El Tin Palace is the oldest royal Egyptian palace still in use.

Opened: 1847
Construction started: 1834
Architectural style: Renaissance Revival architecture
Town or city: Alexandria
Function: Palace
Architect: Pietro Avoscani

History

The palace is located in the Ras el-Tin quarter of Alexandria overlooking the city's Western Harbour. It was built on a promontory which in antiquity had been the site of the island of Pharos. The palace has a long historical association with Egyptian royalty. It is one of few palaces in Egypt to witness the initiation of the long-lasting Muhammad Ali dynasty by Muhammad Ali Pasha (r. 1805–1848) during the early 19th century. A number of foreign architects and engineers were commissioned by Muhammad Ali for the design and construction of the palace. Building activities began in 1834, taking eleven years to complete the original design in 1845. Complementary work and the construction of additional wings continued for two more years until 1847, when it was officially inaugurated.

Style

Ras El Tin Palace has the shape of a large Italian Renaissance palace, with architectural elements and ornamentation inspired by that era, along with Baroque and Moorish elements. It was erected on a foundation of 17,000 square metres (4.2 acres), surrounded by elaborate gardens of 12 feddans (13 acres). Fig trees (Arabic – teen) were already on the palace site, inspiring its name Ras Al-Teen. Through the reign of successive kings, the complex was used as their residence and the government headquarters during the summer season.

Various rulers made changes to the palace. It was totally reconstructed by King Fuad I in the 1920s, with modern services and redecoration making it similar to the opulent Abdeen Palace (built 1863), the larger royal complex in central Cairo. The interior décor combined Renaissance elements with Byzantine, French and Modern. The redesign and construction were overseen by the Italian engineer Ernesto Verrucci Bey. The palace included a swimming pool with a large attached glass pavilion hall. Much of the opulent furniture during this redecoration was supplied by the Parisian ébéniste, François Linke, on a scale not seen since Versailles 200 years earlier. At one end of the building was the harem, but this had become disused.

 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,004 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Koubbeh Palace

Koubbeh Palace is one of the various Egyptian palaces which currently serve as the country's official guest house for visiting dignitaries.

The palace was most likely originally built in the mid-19th century and sold to Khedive Ismail in 1866 by his brother Mustafa Fazl Pasha. It is situated several kilometres north of downtown Cairo, Koubbeh Palace was originally surrounded by agricultural fields and rural villages.

History

Under Khedive Tewfik, Koubbeh Palace was a venue for One Thousand And One Night celebrations, royal weddings, and a place where visiting dignitaries admired magnificent gardens. During his son's rule (Khedive Abbas Hilmi II; r. 1892-1914) the garden palace gradually came to be regarded as complementary to Cairo's Abdin Palace in terms of officialdom.

Style

The Palace was constructed in the Classical Italian style. Surrounded by gardens, the palace takes up a total space of 80 acres.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,004 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Abdeen Palace

Abdeen Palace is a historic Cairo palace, and one of the official residences and the principal workplace of the President of Egypt, located above Qasr el-Nil Street in eastern Downtown Cairo, Egypt.

History

Built on the site of a small mansion owned by Abidin Bey, Abdeen Palace, which is named after him, is considered one of the most sumptuous palaces in the world in terms of its adornments, paintings, and a large number of clocks scattered in the parlours and wings, most of which are decorated with pure gold. Built by Khedive Ismail, to become the official government headquarters instead of the Citadel of Cairo (which had been the centre of Egyptian government since the Middle Ages), this palace was used as well for official events and ceremonies.

Construction started in 1863 and continued for 10 years and the palace was officially inaugurated in 1874.

Style

Erected on an area of 24 feddans, the palace was designed by the French architect Léon Rousseau along with a large number of Egyptian, Italian, French and Turkish decorators. However, the palace’s garden was added in 1921 by Sultan Fuad I on an area of 20 feddans. The cost of building the palace reached 700,000 Egyptian pounds in addition to 2 million pounds for its furnishing. Between four palaces, King Fuad spent more than 18 million French francs with just one Parisian furniture manufacturer Linke & Cie. More money was also spent on the palace’s alteration, preservation and maintenance by consecutive rulers. The palace has 500 suites.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,004 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Tahra Palace

El-Tahra Palace is a palace located in Cairo, Egypt that was designed by Antonio Lasciac. It was mainly built for Princess Amina, daughter of Khedive Ismail and mother of Mohamed Taher Pasha.

History

Tahra Palace proudly bore the name of “Villa Amina Hanem” since inception and was later bequeathed to son, Taher Pasha and had its name changed several times. At one point of time, it was called the “Official Guesthouse” marking the visit of Prince Mohammad Pahlavi, the Crown Prince of Iran. Then, it was renamed as “Qubba Palace Annex” then "Al-Tahery", and finally "Tahra Palace".

Aside from being one of the Egyptian Monrachy's places of residents, the palaces served as a secret base of operation during the October 6th Egyptian-Israeli war.

Style

The Palace was built in "Italianate Palazzo" style.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,004 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Montaza Palace

Montaza Palace is a palace, museum and extensive gardens in the Montaza district of Alexandria, Egypt. It was built on a low plateau east of central Alexandria overlooking a beach on the Mediterranean Sea.

History

The extensive Montaza Palace grounds first had the Salamlek Palace, built-in 1892 by Khedive Abbas II, the last Muhammad Ali Dynasty ruler to hold the Khedive title over the Khedivate of Egypt and Sudan. It was used as a hunting lodge and residence for his companion.

Style

The larger Al-Haramlik Palace and royal gardens were added to the Montaza Palace grounds, being built by King Fuad I in 1932, as a summer palace. It is in a mixture of Ottoman and Florentine styles, with two towers. One of these towers rises distinctively high above with elaborated Italian Renaissance design details. The palace has long open arcades facing the sea along each floor.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,004 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Heliopolis Palace

The Heliopolis Palace is one of the three Egyptian presidential palaces and residences, the others being Montaza Palace and Ras el-Tin Palace, for the executive office of the President of Egypt. It is located in the suburb of Heliopolis, northeast of central Cairo and east of the Nile in Egypt. It was originally built as the grand Heliopolis Palace Hotel in 1910. Now it is for the use of the President of Egypt.

History

In 1958 the hotel was purchased by the government and closed to guests. It was then used to house the offices of government departments. In January 1972, the building became the headquarters of the Federation of Arab Republics, the short-lived political union between Egypt, Libya and Syria, which gave it the current Arabic name of قصر الاتحادية Kasr Al Ittihadia ("Federation Palace").

Style

The landmark hotel was designed by Belgian architect Ernest Jaspar. He introduced the local Heliopolis style of architecture, a synthesis of Persian, Moorish Revival, Islamic, and European Neoclassical architecture. It was built by the contracting firms Leon Rolin & Co. and Padova, Dentamaro & Ferro, the two largest civil contractors in Egypt then. Siemens & Schuepert of Berlin fitted the hotel's web of electric cables and installations. The utilities were to the most modern standards of their day. The hotel operations were under French-administered management.

The Heliopolis architectural style, responsible for many wonderful original buildings in Heliopolis, was exceptionally expressed in the Heliopolis Palace Hotel's exterior and interior design. The hotel had 400 rooms, including 55 private apartments. Beyond the Moorish Revival reception hall, two public rooms were lavishly decorated in the Louis XIV and the Louis XV styles. Beyond those was the Central Hall, the primary public dining space with a classic symmetrical and elegant beauty.

The Central Hall's dome, awe-inspiring to guests, measured 55 metres (180 ft) from floor to ceiling. The 589 square metres (6,340 sq ft) hall's architectural interior was designed by Alexander Marcel of the French Institute and decorated by Georges-Louis Claude. Twenty-two Italian marble columns circled the parquet floor up to the elaborate ceilings. The hall was carpeted with fine Persian carpets and had large mirrored wall panels and a substantial marble fireplace. To one side of the Central Hal was the Grillroom seating 150 guests, and to the other was the billiards hall, with two full-sized British Thurston billiard tables and a 'priceless' French one. The private banquet halls were quite large and elaborate.

The mahogany furniture was ordered from Maples of London. Damascus-made 'East Orient style' lamps, lanterns, and chandeliers hung throughout, suspended like stalactite pendants. The upper gallery contained oak-panelled reading and card rooms furnished by Krieger of Paris. The basement and staff areas were so large that a narrow-gauge railway was installed running the length of the hotel, passing by offices, kitchens, pantries, refrigerators, storerooms and the staff mess.

 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top