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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After a few sunny days in Malaga and Cordoba, it was time to head to the ultimate prize of my Andalucia trip - Granada. It was a memorable 2.5 hour bus ride onboard a super luxurious bus with Business Class seats, onboard movies, and even a snack pack. It was 18 euros well-spent!

1. Puerta Elvira is an entrance to the Albaicín district, the old Arab quarter.



2. Small white houses sprawled along the hillsides. The narrow roads and alleys were not busy with tourist traffic.







5. The terrain rises quite quickly as the district rests along Granada's hillsides.















12. With short houses dotted along the hillsides, the roads open up to more views every now and then.







15. The view from the Mirador S. Cristobal is quite wide.



































32. The blue skies seem to never end. With summer around the corner, the sun stayed up long enough to afford even a lengthy siesta.







35. Minibuses ply these streets. Granada's key tourist attractions are within walking distance of each other, while the uphill runs aren't bad.

































51. Although the Albaicín's streets have been quiet so far, I encountered a much bigger crowd at the Mirador S. Nicolas, which has the best views of the Alhambra.









The full set is available on my website : http://www.globalphotos.org/granada.htm
 

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I agree, superb photos man, thanks a lot!!!
 

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Part fortress, palace, and gardens, the Alhambra is a testament of Muslim influence in Spain during the medieval period. In 1984, it, and the nearby Albaycín district, were declared a UNESCO World Heritage site.

82. The Alhambra runs a strict quota system to limit the number of visitors to certain parts of the massive complex. Having heard stories of much time wasted in long lines, I opted to pay a little extra to get an online ticket, guaranteeing my entry into the restricted sections. Luckily, as I visited on a weekday, the crowds were thin upon my arrival just before opening time. There was no line for the automatic ticketing machines where I retrieved my ticket with my credit card in seconds.

My first stop was Generalife, a small palace but covered with very lush and leafy gardens.





84. The rest of the Alhambra sat on the other side.



85. The city shone gloriously under the morning blue skies.



86. The Nasrid Palaces have strict entry requirements to limit the number of visitors inside. The Muslim influence is quite evident. It seemed I had ventured into the Middle East.





















96. To reduce my Ryanair surcharges, I opted to pack light and have carry-on luggage only. The sacrifice was I had to choose between laptop and DSLR. I gave up the DSLR and used a small digital camera for this trip. At first, I had worries over the quality of the photos given the DSLR is so much more powerful especially with zoom shots and low lighting. However, with ample sunshine and fairly bright interiors, these photos turned out satisfactory.









100. After examining the intricately-decorated interiors, the palace opens up to a courtyard, the Patio de los Arrayanes, which features a reflective pool.









































More in the next part. The full set is at http://www.globalphotos.org/granada.htm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Various windows within the Alhambra open up views of the Albaicín, which is on an adjacent hill.

















More intricate interiors await in the other buildings.















































 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Past the Puerta del Vino, the Alcazaba is the military part of the Alhambra. There are various vantage points from the tops of defence walls and towers that offer the best views of the city.











Looking back at the Nasrid Palaces and the Palacio de Carlos V.













































The Torre de la Vela is the furthest edge of the Alcazaba that tourists can visit. Elevated above everything else, Granada shone against the brilliant sunshine.

























The Full Set : http://www.globalphotos.org/granada.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The mosque's baths no longer showcase the glory of yesteryear. Today, it takes some imagination to recall what it may have looked like when it was still in use.













I didn't see that many shops within the Alhambra itself. This is one of them, displaying their wares with respect to the site's history.



The Palacio de Carlos V is my most hated building in the Alhambra. The exterior's designs is completely incoherent with the rest of the palace. Much of the exhibition facilities have also been closed due to renovations.

















The Palacio de Yusuf III is a lush garden that is beautifully manicured by an army of horticulturalists. Unlike the Nasrid Palaces next door, there are few buildings in this corner of the Alhambra.























The Palacio del Partal is a narrow building that stretches along the hillside with windows that face the Albaicín.







 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Construction of Granada's cathedral began in the 16th century and it wasn't finished until some 300 years later. The massive structure joins with the neighbouring Capilla Real, where Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand II are buried.













































 

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beautiful pictures of this extraordinary city. The most beautiful southern spain imo. I just began a thread about andalucía yesterday, where i am gonna show also pics of Granada. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The Monasterio de San Jeronimo is a huge facility a little bit off the main town centre. However, it is still well worth a visit as its serene courtyards and large spaces are full of atmosphere and character. It was the first monaserty to be built after the Christian re-conquest.































































While most of the rooms and the courtyard were simply decorated, the chapel was completely the opposite. Intricate carvings and paintings in all sorts of colours graced the interiors from floor to ceiling.

















































The full set : http://www.globalphotos.org/granada.htm
 

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Awesome set of photos of good quality. Very complete. Did you visit the monastery of ''La Cartuja''? The contrast between the rest of the rooms and the tabernacle is huge!

Un saludo!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Awesome set of photos of good quality. Very complete. Did you visit the monastery of ''La Cartuja''? The contrast between the rest of the rooms and the tabernacle is huge!

Un saludo!
Unfortunately, I didn't have enough time to venture to the outskirts to visit La Cartuja. In retrospect, I should not have taken those afternoon siestas, but the sun was quite strong!
 
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