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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
On April 23, 2018, a white van mounted the curb on Yonge Street and ran down pedestrians enjoying a warm, spring day. It moved almost 2km before the driver was arrested but 10 people ranging from 22 to 94 were killed.

On April 29, a vigil was held at Mel Lastman Square, which was along the section of Yonge where this incident happened. Various religious leaders as well as the political elite attended to show the city's resilience.











A citizen's memorial has appeared across the street near where the van first mounted the sidewalk at Yonge and Finch. Among the 10 killed were a South Korean international student and a Jordanian visiting his son.















I have actually covered North York in one of my previous Toronto threads. For more on this part of Yonge Street from my 2017 collection, click here or visit my website.

I have been quite lucky with the flight paths so far this year with many aerial opportunities over the city. Some of the close-ups might give you a perception Toronto is a very dense city, but step back a bit, and you will soon see there are so many lowrises even in the centre of town.







Then there is all that unsustainable suburban sprawl.





Strip malls line the main corridors. This is a stretch of Hwy 7 in Markham, a northern suburb.





Heading west, the landscape becomes more industrial. A recent subway extension opened to this part of town recently. Why they chose this instead of intensifying or finishing a half-done subway line in the city is a mystery. Politicians are not good transit planners.



On December 17, 2017, the 8.6km Line 1 subway extension opened to Vaughan, marking the first time the subway has crossed the Toronto city border. Of the 6 new subway stations, 2 are located in York Region, accounting for 2.4km of track. The $3.2 billion extension was funded by the federal, provincial, and municipal governments. During my visit, the trains and stations were mostly empty.









Guess they couldn't afford platform-screen doors either.







Let's head downtown for a more urban experience. St. Lawrence Market has a number of cooked food places to grab a lunch. One particular restaurant always has a line. I tried their lobster roll and it was quite good. They didn't cheap out on the materials!



Fresh Canadian oysters from PEI could be shuckled in front of you for as low as $2.25 each! They're more expensive than the Sydney Fish Market but tasted just as fresh.





Satisfied with lunch, I explored around for some more culinary inspiration.

















The market is close enough to the financial district for office workers to reach during the warmer months.







These old streetcars have been around for way beyond their life expectancy. Manufacturing issues have delayed the implementation of new rolling stock so they will continue to ply the streets for some time to come.







With more residential developments appearing downtown, hopefully the streetcars can fill up a bit more. Transit ridership growth hasn't been quite good in recent years.

















For more photos, visit my website : http://www.globalphotos.org/toronto.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Just across from the CN Tower is the Railway Museum, which has a number of historic rolling stock parked outside.











The rail lands area is filling up nicely, as well as along the waterfront. People now realize it's great to live downtown.











However, living along harbourfront has its risks, especially during the winter. It is quite painful to walk outside with the strong winds blowing off the lake.











Frozen ...





















For more, visit my revamped Toronto harbourfront gallery : http://www.globalphotos.org/to-harbour.htm

 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
While North York's centre along Yonge Street is lined with highrise residentials and office buildings, the density tapers off quite quickly blocks away. Single family detached houses are common just off the large arterial roads.





















The widest highway I have ever driven on, the 401 crosses east-to-west and looks incredibly intimidating.



In the 19th century, this part of the city was a rural farming area. The Zion Schoolhouse was built in 1869 to give free education to the farming community's children. It only had 1 classroom, which was used for all grades.

















More photos on my website : http://www.globalphotos.org/to-northyork.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Soaring 72 stories tall, First Canadian Place opened its doors in 1975. Its white marble decor remains fresh and smart today.







First opened in 1994, the CBC Museum closed its doors in December 2017 with its exhibits slated to move to Ottawa. However, some items continue to be on display in the basement, tucked away behind the escalators.











 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The waterfront east of Yonge Street is far less developed, and awaits a new urban community even as the city continues to sprawl outwards.























One of the best skyline viewing spots is just off the coast on the Toronto Islands. Ferries run during the warmer months to Centre Island, with limited service during the winter.



















 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Kensington Market looks like a typical residential street, but on closer inspection, the streetfronts are colourful and trendy. The area was home to the Jewish community in the early 1900s, who set up shops in their front lawns. Today, the mix is quite diverse, and includes a visible Portuguese and Caribbean influence as well as Chinese and Vietnamese shops spilling over from neighbouring Chinatown.















































































More on my website : https://www.globalphotos.org/to-kensington.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Nice pictures. Do you usually visit Toronto during the winter?
Not my usual preference to come during the long cold season but my autumn is typically peak time for Europe to avoid the crowds and spring in Japan or Korea for the cherry blossoms. Summer is expensive everywhere so I rarely travel far then.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The Scarborough RT opened in 1985 and is used by about 35,000 commuters daily. With the end of its service life coming, the government is in heavy debate as to how to replace this line, either with LRT or a subway option. In 2013, a 3-stop subway extension was initially approved, but that was changed to a 1-stop line in 2016 as costs went up. The debate continues, while some trains had to be wrapped in vinyl to reduce paint and body work.























More on my website : https://www.globalphotos.org/to-subway.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The Annex was once on the fringes of the city and was home to the wealthy. Although many of the Edwardian mansions have been torn down as density increased and apartments came in their place, there are still streets of historic homes with interesting architectural features.

One of the district's most famous residents is Jane Jacobs, an urbanist who settled here in 1968 until her death in 2006. She advocated for dense, mixed-use, and walkable cities and not big highways leading from suburbia.









































More on my website : https://www.globalphotos.org/toronto.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
During my regular house-keeping, I noticed some 2018 walking tours around Toronto's neighbourhoods haven't been processed yet. This tour starts at Yonge/Eglinton, an intensifying Midtown intersection with many highrise projects. However, the density tapers off dramatically just a few blocks west with quiet streets of detached homes.













Forest Hill is an upscale residential area of large houses and leafy streets. Expectedly, schools for these upper class residents need to be grander. Upper Canada College was founded by the lieutenant governor of Upper Canada in 1829.











The Bishop Strachan School opened in 1867 to educate girls into tomorrow's leaders. At the time, this concept was quite radical as women were not treated as equals to men.











More photos on my website : Toronto Midtown Photo Gallery
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
One of my favourite Vietnamese restaurants in the city is in Parkdale, so I made a walking tour out of it. There are many rows of lowrise homes to see and some interesting shops along Roncesvalles. Pardale first appeared in the Toronto City Directory in 1878 with more than have the people listed being working class folks, succh as labourers, carpenters, railway workers, bakers, and a milkman. There were 2 general stores on Queen Street.



























More photos on my website.
 
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