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L O S A N G E L E S
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HOLLYWOOD PALLADIUM RESIDENCES​

As the environmental impact report for the proposed Hollywood Palladium Residences gets underway,
we found a few more project renderings to share.​


Also included is an outline of the ever-burgeoning Hollywood skyline, which puts the project's two 28-story towers in the context of the neighborhood's existing and proposed buildings. What are the odds NIMBY lawyer extraordinaire Robert Silverstein -most recently behind the second lawsuit against the nearby Millennium Hollywood -has this drawing taped to a dartboard in his office? Also found in the notice announcing preparation of the EIR are renderings of the three courtyards planned as publicly accessible space in the project.



If all goes according to plan, the project will bring 13,000 square feet of neighborhood-serving retail, either 598 or 730 residential units (depending on whether a hotel component is included), and up to 820 bike stalls to a surface parking lot behind the Palladium Theater. As part of the deal, the property owner would also apply for historic status for the streamline moderne 1940 venue.


.​


EVE BACHRACH
CURBED LA​
 

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Silver Lake
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I can't express how much I love the look and feel of this place. It's as if Mike Brady designed it!!!
 
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Silver Lake
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Absolutely not.
 

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Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
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Another Glimpse of the Future Palladium Residences



Take another look at Sunset Boulevard's stylish Palladium Residences, the high-rise towers proposed for the parking lot abutting the Hollywood Palladium. The mixed-use complex, unveiled last summer by developer Crescent Heights, would offer a blend of residential units and hotel rooms in a pair of sleek, 28-story buildings. An official website for the project features a new set of high-resolution renderings, highlighting the Palladium Residences' street-level integration and prominent location within the Hollywood skyline.

The twin 350-foot towers, designed by Stanley Saitowitz of Natoma Architects, could move forward under two distinct development programs. Under the first scenario, Crescent Heights would build a purely residential project with 731 dwelling units. In an alternate program, the towers would feature a mixture of 538 residential units and 250 hotel rooms. Both plans call for a total of 14,000 square feet of pedestrian-oriented commercial space, in addition an underground parking garage with accommodations for approximately 1,900 vehicles and 820 bicycles.










Stanley Saitowitz is just so money. His work in San Francisco has turned a lot of heads. :cheers:
 

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Wth do they need 1,900 parking spaces for if there's only 731 units or 538 units with 250 hotel rooms?! Most residents in either scenario would have 3 reserved car spaces!
 

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Wth do they need 1,900 parking spaces for if there's only 731 units or 538 units with 250 hotel rooms?! Most residents in either scenario would have 3 reserved car spaces!
As a guess, parking for the retail and for the Palladium?
 

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L O S A N G E L E S
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
LOS ANGELES NEEDS HOUSING BADLY,​
AND PALLADIUM RESIDENCES MORE THAN FITS THE NEED​


Here's a revolution happening in Los Angeles: Rapid transit stretches from Hollywood to Santa Monica, from Pasadena to Long Beach, and people are moving back into the urban core rather than farther out, defying the cliche that we are 72 suburbs in search of a city. Search no longer: Los Angeles is becoming a model metropolis for the 21st century, with one very major obstacle:
We are facing the greatest housing crisis in America.​

Shocking as it may sound, it is easier to find an apartment in New York than here. (We have fewer vacancies.) Our supply of new units is fewer per capita than San Francisco's. Apartment rents continue to skyrocket at double the rate of inflation and are now hovering around $1,873 per month, on average. The San Fernando Valley and the Inland Empire used to provide some relief, but not anymore. And the gap between income and the cost of housing is greater in Los Angeles than any place in the nation. Even as minimum-wage battles yield some increases, the housing shortage remains critical, causing Mayor Eric Garcetti to call for 100,000 new units by 2021.

Given the severity of L.A.'s housing crisis, what's all the brouhaha about the Palladium Residences project in Hollywood? It promises more than 700 apartments two blocks from the Hollywood/Vine Metro stop, which is exactly the sort of development we need in post-suburban Los Angeles. Nevertheless, it has met with months of litigation and protest, and the battle continues. Indeed, opponents vowed last week to “exhaust every possible avenue to stop this project.”

Does the Palladium developer, Crescent Heights, want to bulldoze some architectural gem or vital part of the neighborhood? Is the project incompatible with the surroundings, either in use or scale? Is it an eyesore? The answer: none of the above.

Los Angeles real estate interests have a long history of trouncing communities that get in the way of development, especially poor communities of color — think Chavez Ravine, or the neighborhoods buried under freeway construction. But the Palladium won't displace a single person.

Rather than detract from the neighborhood, the project adds pedestrian activity and amenities. Its site design calls for shops and restaurants at the ground level, a public open space on each of three bordering streets, public rooftop terraces and plenty of parking. The project does this while framing and preserving the Hollywood Palladium — not a particularly remarkable work of architecture but a treasure trove of entertainment history since its opening in 1940.


It's true that the Palladium's two new residential towers, at 28 stories, are tall by L.A. standards. But existing buildings that flank the project are only slightly shorter, so the claim that the new project doesn't fit the context is a stretch.

Leading the Palladium opposition is Kilroy Realty Corp., which owns the towers on both sides of the Palladium, and its tenant, the AIDS Healthcare Foundation. So tall buildings are OK, but only if they're already occupied? That's a classic case of pulling up the ladder.

As for aesthetics, only critics opposed to height no matter what — who never see beauty in verticality — would call the Palladium towers an eyesore. They are designed by a talented California architect, Stanley Saitowitz, who has built stunning residential projects in San Francisco.

Lacking better ammunition, detractors mainly use the D-word. I'm talking about “density,” the term hurled at every project Angelenos want to defeat. Density in the case of the Palladium project is code for traffic, and fair enough, the towers will add cars in the immediate vicinity. In the grander scheme of things, though, density improves mobility because everyday life — work, home, play — is more compact. By contrast, if we insist on sprawl, everyone has to drive long distances.

No new development is ever perfect, but the critics have the Palladium's problems all wrong.

They say there are too many housing units, instead of too few affordable ones. Crescent Heights has suggested that its smaller units without luxury amenities will fall into the mid-market range. It hasn't finalized its plans, though, so there's time to negotiate a generous number of apartments — 25% of the total, say — priced within reach of lower income Angelenos.

Critics are also ignoring the one part of the project that really will be bad for traffic: the nearly 2,000 proposed parking spaces spread across the site. Plentiful parking doesn't solve congestion; it encourages it by laying out a welcome mat for everyone who wants to drive.



We've already proved — even here in Los Angeles — that people are willing to ride rather than drive, and to house themselves without housing a car. In downtown L.A., for instance, plenty of people are buying and renting apartments without dedicated parking spots, forgoing cars on short trips and increasing that most desirable type of congestion — pedestrians on sidewalks.

Angelenos may still think of their city as a suburban metropolis, but as the population grows, low-rise development becomes increasingly untenable. Density is inevitable; the only questions are how we build it and where we want it. If we can't add well-designed housing in Hollywood, just two blocks from the Red Line, where should it go? Anyone who answers “nowhere” or “your neighborhood, not mine” doesn't have any solution at all.


DANA CUFF​
LOSANGELESTIMES​
 

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Residents Move to Stop Massive Developments

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NEW event in SoCal! Meet the people leading the sector at RealShare Industrial West. The Westin Long Beach, January 19-20. Room block available. Plus: book now for RealShare LOS ANGELES on March 24 and network with 1,000 professionals.


The campaign is a citywide Los Angeles effort.
LOS ANGELES—The Los Angeles community may not be as excited about the development activity as some developers have led us to believe. The Coalition to Preserve L.A., led by Michael Weinstein of the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, is looking to push through the Neighborhood Integrity Initiative, a ballot measure that would require developers to stick to the general plan without exemption. According to a poll conducted earlier this month, 72% of Los Angeles residents would support such a poll.

“In the Hollywood area where our offices are headquartered, there are nine projects with zoning exemptions and a lot of these are mega developments, but there are also issues in Koreatown, Miracle Mile, Downtown and across the city,” Weinstein tells GlobeSt.com. “It is really difficult for individual community groups to challenge these projects because there are so many of them and they are so outgunned by developers. We felt the need to be a citywide solution. The whole idea of plot zoning is an oxymoron. The whole idea of zoning is that you have a zone, not that each individual plot has its own rules. The things that make city wonderful is that there is a character and a fabric of communities rather than helter skelter development.”

Weinstein notes that the biggest single issue is the congestion and traffic issues that result from these major developments. “People are horrified by the degree of traffic congestion and how these developments are changing the character of the community,” he says. “We are going to put up billboards that say ‘Stop Manhattanwood.’ This is not the California lifestyle that people were seeking when they moved here.”

While the campaign has been focused in the group’s Hollywood home base, Weinstein says that this is a citywide effort. “We are still in the process of doing a lot of the grassroots organizing. Most of the mega projects that have been stopped are here in Hollywood, like the Millennium project and the Sunset Gordon project; the Target, but it certainly applies to other areas of the city.” However, he is quick to explain that the coalition isn’t anti-development, only against the exceptions and plot zoning. “All we are asking for is that they stick to the general plan, which would not prevent a lot of projects that don’t require exceptions,” he adds.
 

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Globalizing LA
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^^ The general plan is outdated, plain and simple...
 

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this weinstein guy is out of control!!!

72% of Residents Support Limitations on Developers

The Coalition to Preserve L.A. is based in Hollywood.
LOS ANGELES—The Coalition to Preserve L.A. completed a poll last month that showed 72% of residents supported a ballot measure that would require developers to adhere to the general plan without exemption, stopping many of the massive developments throughout the city. In an earlier story, GlobeSt.com talked to Michael Weinstein, the president of the AIDs Healthcare Foundation and the organizer behind the so-called Neighborhood Integrity Initiative, about the potential ballot measure and the goals of the organization. According to this new poll, the he has the support of the community.

“We have been very involved corporate citizens going back decades, and we have had our ears to the ground. No one has contested that we are trying to skew the results,” Weinstein tells GlobeSt.com. “This is in line with how people feel about Wall Street and why this presidential election has turned into such a crapshoot. People are angry and they feel that the deck is stacked against them. Here in L.A., the developers rule, and people are very unhappy about that.”

Conducted December 3 through December 7, the survey polled 557 Los Angeles residents online about their support for the Neighborhood Integrity Initiative, and concluded that two out of three registered Los Angeles voters would support the group’s proposed measure, which would halt individual parcel-by-parcel or ‘spot zone’ amendments and/or building exemptions; enact a temporary, two-year moratorium on building or demolition permits for projects that do not adhere to existing city planning regulations and/or for which the city granted a General Plan amendment, or zone or height change; take the preparation of a project’s required Environmental Impact Report out of the hands of developers; and limit a developer’s ability to reduce required parking for building developments.

In the survey, residents seemed most concerned about the congestion and traffic resulting from these developments. “The traffic nightmare is what really came across the most in the survey that we did,” says Weinstein, who adds that public transit is a non-solution for the group. “People do not take the subway. Show me evidence that people are taking the subway. Ridership is down on the subway, and there are a lot of places that you can’t get to on the subway. It is a fantasy.”

According to Weinstein, the real problem is our local government, which pushes through these developments and allows for exemptions. “It was really Mayor Garcetti who built the framework with his rhetoric about elegant density, which pushed this agenda forward,” he explains. “There is much too much influence from the developers on the city council and the Mayor.”

But, the group hasn’t been without criticism from the development community, which, according to Weinstein, has been trying to block the ballot measure. One of the accusations is that the group is a nimby. “You could call us a nimby if we didn’t want to see a school or a hospital or a homeless shelter or those types of projects being built,” says Weinstein. “You can’t call us a nimby for not wanting more luxury towers in the neighborhood.”

Weinstein doesn’t respond to the slights because the initiative has already seen so much success. “They have really been throwing whatever they can at us, and we have not been responding. This is a situation where they have to convince people to vote against what they really want.”

We have reached out to developers to see how such a measure would affect the Los Angeles real estate market, and will continue to report as more news unfolds.
 

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L.A. City Council OKs 2 controversial high-rises in Hollywood

The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday approved a plan to build two residential high-rises, each as tall as 30 stories, next to the Hollywood Palladium on Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood, over the objections of a nonprofit group next door.

On a 12-0 vote, the council backed zoning and height district changes for the Palladium Residences, a pair of towers expected to have 731 apartment units, to be built where parking lots now sit near a Metro Red Line subway stop.

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Excellent. I hope these two building somehow block all of the sun from the AIDS foundations office.

I really love these towers. They will be great for Hollywood
 

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Sounds good, but I guess it's still going to be a long time until groundbreaking. I would imagine that the AIDS Foundation is going to hold off for a mega-bucks "donation" before letting this one happen.
 

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Sounds good, but I guess it's still going to be a long time until groundbreaking. I would imagine that the AIDS Foundation is going to hold off for a mega-bucks "donation" before letting this one happen.
With no interference, I believe ground breaking would be slated for 2018.
 
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