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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hong Kong is often criticised for not having the cultural aspects cities such as New York with its broadways, Paris and London with its operas and all those cities with their impressive art galleries have.

However, this is a very Western-centric view to take.

But then I got thinking - what exactly constitutes as 'Hong Kong culture'? But couldn't think of a suitable answer ... so let's have it out.
 

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Perfect timing for the new thread for this article from today's The Standard.
Indeed, I do that elevator "door-close" thing every morning in the US, and whine about other don't push the button. :lol:

Hong Kong habits hard to break

Wednesday, July 15, 2009

Will you be packing any bad Hong Kong habits in your suitcase when you set off for your summer holidays? You'd probably like to think that you won't, but you can't be too sure.

Even when I am in Hong Kong, I make a point of holding doors open for others, not pushing through crowds, letting people get past me in busy areas and so on. I was brought up that way. I don't talk loudly, either.

But I have caught myself doing something very "Hong Kong" sometimes when I am traveling overseas. I get into an elevator, and so long as no one in the immediate vicinity is about to get in, I push the button for my floor and the "door close" button straight away.

It is automatic. It is only when I notice other people in the lift looking at me that realize I am acting strangely. They are probably wondering why this guy is in such a hurry. Is there an emergency? Is someone chasing him? Or is he from Hong Kong?

We don't realize we are doing it when we are here at home, but overseas it stands out.

The same goes for those of us who talk very loudly. They aren't aware that they are doing it because Hong Kong is such a noisy place. But talk like that in many other parts of the world, and people will stare.

The impatient elevator button-pushing is something people from overseas notice about us when they are here. I will try to make sure they don't notice it when I am over there enjoying my relaxing, no-rush holiday.

Bernard Charnwut Chan, chairman of the Antiquities Advisory Board, sees culture from all perspectives.
Source: http://www.thestandard.com.hk/news_...5&sid=24564897&con_type=1&d_str=20090715&fc=4
 

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Just sharing a thought, because i really love HK.

After 7 times visited HongKong, i have concluded myself, that HK people actually are very nice and friendly, not only towards "white people" but also with other asian people included me...

for a first timer, yes maybe you will get shocked about HK culture but after a few days here, you will understand about the HK people culture...and believe me, This city is WAYYY friendlier than any other ASEAN countries like KL or Singapore....

Btw, I am in HK now, currently stucked in Tsim Sha shui Internet cafe....playing game :p

cheers
 

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Hong Kong people are quite okay (actually it really depends on where you go and what type of people you encounter).

Still, I believe the most friendly (or at least one of the most-friendly people) are those working at Ngong Ping. Those attendants and staff people there are indeed friendly and humble.

P.S.
Anyways, on another subject, I haven't tried riding in any public bus. So for those who do, I have a question to ask:
Do you encounter these things quite often.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RSHziqJWYcM&fmt=18


EDIT:
Haha, that was a hilarious video indeed as well as the quotes introduced.
"I enjoy fucking"
"You enjoy fucking"
"Fucking is not harmful"
"My ***** is not your mom"

Epic :lol:
 

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Hong Kong is often criticised for not having the cultural aspects cities such as New York with its broadways, Paris and London with its operas and all those cities with their impressive art galleries have.

However, this is a very Western-centric view to take.

But then I got thinking - what exactly constitutes as 'Hong Kong culture'? But couldn't think of a suitable answer ... so let's have it out.
Very often is the case that Londoners go to operas just for the sake of behaving like a cultured man and doing what a cultured man should do, without knowing the least about opera and classical music and literature and all sorts of fine arts.

Besides, these fine arts do not necessarily point to a "Parisian" culture or "London" culture. They're just european and not unique.

Hong Kong has its very unique culture because we have the highest expectations, complains the most, being the most efficient, etc., plus a beautifully balanced traditional/western view of education, political system and moral values.

As for the forms of entertainment... I quite like Skybean's post ;) I've never played mahjong when I was still in HK, but after being stuck overseas for some while I began to do things that HKers should do, such as mahjong, sing k, milk tea, developing a fondness for tai pai tong food... and all that just to identify myself proudly as a HKer.
 

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^^ Funny people who haven't resided overseas always think HK is bad and always demand to live overseas or at least escape from HK; but once s/he has lived overseas, many would start to appreciate what HK has had offered, although there are still many bad things.

Then, we become even more HK than ever, and probably many of us are one of those.
 

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^^ Funny people who haven't resided overseas always think HK is bad and always demand to live overseas or at least escape from HK; but once s/he has lived overseas, many would start to appreciate what HK has had offered, although there are still many bad things.

Then, we become even more HK than ever, and probably many of us are one of those.
Problem is... I felt that HK is great before I left, and felt even more so after I left lol
 

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:p we'll see

sometimes we do seem to have a choice but in reality it's very difficult to choose otherwise, so I'll probably stay for another few years (hopefully within 5 years)
At least it is not 2047, you still get one more year to enjoy HK before the "50 year unchange deal" ends. :lol:

Well... I am not that much older and only experience from across the Atlantic, but I am looking at 2011, exactly 5 years after I got my bachelor. :nuts:
Hopefully I will finish my master, and get my professional engineer license within the next 18 months before I move back.

My philosophy was just spent an extra few years overseas with some international experience before spending the last 40 years of your careers in HK, China or even Asia.
 

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I have lived in London and found that much of Londons so c alled culture is exclusive and expensive...when I was in HK people (mostly my fellow ******') would bemoan the so called absense of culture in HK...but I get much stimulation and adrenelin walking teh streets of Kowloon...up Shanghai Gai towards Mong Kok and much more GENUINE street life in the wet markets than London and its false markets full of middle class twats and tourists...on my way back from my Kowloon walk I'll get the Star ferry for 2 bucks and look at that wonderful view of Central...and wonder: where else on this planet can one see such a view for such a bargain?

Plus, I can drink 24/7 in HK and be safe...in London we get last orders at 11 and run a gauntlet of fools and hooligans...but hey, it has St Pauls....yawn.
 

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...I'll get the Star ferry for 2 bucks and look at that wonderful view of Central...and wonder: where else on this planet can one see such a view for such a bargain?
New York. The Staten Island Ferry is FREE of charge. :lol:
You get the view of Downtown Manhattan, the Statue of Liberty, and the smelly ports along New Jersey.

But there aren't much to do on Staten Island, unlike Kowloon and Hong Kong Island.
It's more like a immediate round trip ferry ride.
 
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