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Downtown Las Vegas Projects



Downtown Las Vegas - Jepson Real Estate


I think downtown has a lot of potential. So far it's contained to Fremont Street. Fremont East will continues to expand but further down it gets seedy and some of the old casinos and hotels have been closed but it's potential lies in being Las Vegas's hipster district rather than depending on working class tourist. North of Fremont is the freeway but there are some parking lots which could be developed. To the West is the proposed Symphony Park development, however it is seperated from the rest of downtown by the railyards. To the South if mostly government buildings and is semi ghetto but there are some locations that could be redeveloped. The question is could Downtown function as a real downtown that Las Vegas lacks?
 

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I think the question on whether downtown Las Vegas will ever develop into a more traditional city center is based on how much the city's (and region's) economy diversifies in the next 10 years. Vegas is still a tourism based town. There is no getting around that. Until Las Vegas can develop further beyond the confines of recreational tourism, I don't see a way (or need) for downtown LV to transform.

It could develop into a primarily residential neighborhood, much like downtown SD. But given the vast desert lands surrounding it, making the case for urbanization in the core would be more difficult.
 

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While not entirely focused on downtown, wasn't LV trying to develop (sell itself) as the next (or a) tech hub a few years ago? I know I read a few articles on the topic.
 

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Most cities are trying to sell themselves as tech hubs. They convince themselves they have unique selling points (sometimes with more wish than likelihood of success) and pass tax abatements, develop the typical "innovation district," and write chamber press releases about every startup and back office. Generally the winning cities keep winning, and a few others rise from the hopeful state enough to make the effort worthwhile. This has been happening for decades, from the "silicon __s" of the 80s and 90s to the biotech attempts in the 00s to the mix of both plus clean tech today.

Every city should have a vibrant downtown. A lot of people prefer to live, work, and play in urban districts, and they'll do so if the opportunity is available. That's a huge location factor for businesses that care about recruiting top performers. As Downtown LV gets momentum, it should continue to take advantage of a pent-up desire to locate there. Especially as the "if onlys" fall away...we at Acme would locate our regional office there, if only it was a little less gritty" and so on. Momentum does that. It's shown pretty clearly on the residential side, as more residents bring services, residential feel, and a perception of safety, which beget more residents.
 

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SDfan is right. Diversification is needed first. You need another industry besides casinos that wants land in the Downtown area.

Beyond that, the little "regular" business going on seems to be decentralized. There are some midrise and highrise office buildings scattered here and there around Paradise Township. If you wanted to build a centralized Downtown, you would have to encourage Paradise Township and other municipalities to cooperate with Las Vegas.
 

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Las Vegas is theoretically divided into 5 different parts:
1. Las Vegas,
2. North Las Vegas,
3. western part — Summerlin, Summerlin South,
4. southeastern part — Henderson,
5. south — Paradise, Spring Valley, Enterprise etc.
They all deserve they're own downtowns. Centralization = traffic jams.
 

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Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
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Always stunted in comparison to the Strip, Downtown will forever be the "sober" perfunctory side of Vegas (aside from Fremont Street). as the metro grows it will take on more heft but as a singular entity it's most likely to remain doomed as a government ghetto with some cultural grace notes attached.
 

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Journeyman
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Las Vegas is theoretically divided into 5 different parts:
1. Las Vegas,
2. North Las Vegas,
3. western part — Summerlin, Summerlin South,
4. southeastern part — Henderson,
5. south — Paradise, Spring Valley, Enterprise etc.
They all deserve they're own downtowns. Centralization = traffic jams.
In most cities it's important to centralize because (a) then transit can efficiently serve at least most of the office jobs, and (b) because many industries like to cluster together. Two of many reasons.
 

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mhays has it about right.

I don't think downtown Vegas will ever amount to much more than it already is. There is no reason for new tech (if it comes) to locate there. The outer edges offer more bang for the buck.

Unfortunately, downtown Vegas has the look of a downtown metro much smaller than Vegas actually is, but there are good reasons for that due to the tourism tree that makes it unique.

I am glad Vegas is bouncing back from a horrific great recession, but this area as a true center of tech is a bit of a stretch. It will certainly be interesting to watch how Vegas continues to grow as not only a gaming capital, but an entertainment capital, (which IMO is a better bet), and if pro sports can make any inroads into the city. The future obviously is not certain in this desert oasis. The water topic is a whole 'nuther thread.
 
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