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Typically it's about 10 - 15 years in the U.S., or about 200,000 to 300,000 km's (125,000 to 185,000 miles).

Of course, some cars last a lot longer.

My aunt's Suburban (full-sized SUV), which I drove a few weeks ago, has 275,000 miles on the odometer - that's over 440,000 kilometers. I believe that it is a 1994 model.

The minimum vehicle tax in Minnesota (I believe it is something like $30?) applies to all vehicles over a certain age (9 or 10 years, I believe), whether they are worth $400 or $40,000. Some older cars may actually be the best value - Buicks, for example, were generally driven by older drivers (who tend to be less aggressive and put less stress on the vehicle than younger drivers), have a good feature set, a reliable engine, and are available cheaply. Generally American and European older (>10y) cars are cheaper than Japanese cars of the same age.

And, of course, there are numerous restored (and some original) classic muscle cars from the 1950's and 1960's, as well as a few cars (mostly restored, I'm guessing) from the 1930's and before. However, these usually aren't taken out very often, except for joyrides and to car shows. This is actually a common hobby among American males.

Older vehicles other than those having collector value have risen in price dramatically over the past few years, probably in part due to Obama's "Cash for Clunkers" program.
 

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In Singapore we have something called the Certificate of Entitlement (COE), valid for only 10 years. Pls read the excerpts from Wiki.

Technically, you need to own this piece of paper before you can own a car. And the cost of this paper has risen tremendously over the past year. As of 20 July 2012, you need to pay S$92,700 (about US$73,800) for the COE, in addition to the cost of the car, depending on which model. A brand new BMW 528i will easily set you back by about S$280,000 (US$222,000)!!!!



The Certificate of Entitlement (COE), instituted by the government of Singapore since May 1990, is a program designed to limit car ownership and hence the number of vehicles on the country's roads. This system in effect requires residents of Singapore to bid for the right to buy a motor vehicle, with the number of certificates deliberately restricted.

The COE allows holders to own a car for a period of 10 years, after which they must scrap or export their car with financial incentives or bid for another COE at the prevailing rate if they wish to continue using their car for a further 5 or 10 years.

Non-transferable categories:
Category A : Cars (1600 cc and below) and taxis
Category B : Cars (1601 cc and above)
Category D : Motorcycles
Transferable categories:
Category C : Goods Vehicles and Buses
Category E : Open Category
 

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Interesting.
I am petrolhead so Singapore is definitely not the place for me :D
Naturally I understand purpose of this legislation.
 

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In Singapore we have something called the Certificate of Entitlement (COE), valid for only 10 years. Pls read the excerpts from Wiki.

Technically, you need to own this piece of paper before you can own a car. And the cost of this paper has risen tremendously over the past year. As of 20 July 2012, you need to pay S$92,700 (about US$73,800) for the COE, in addition to the cost of the car, depending on which model. A brand new BMW 528i will easily set you back by about S$280,000 (US$222,000)!!!!
:eek::eek::eek::eek::eek:

In Brazil of course any joe can buy a car without even having a drivers licence, but the prices of cars is very high (double of the USA) and there is an annual car tax of 2% to 4% of the vehicle's value, depending on the state.

The average lifespan of car is around 15 years I guess. Cars over a certain age (30?) do not pay the annual tax, and can be considered historical. That being said, old "clunkers" are relatively rare in Brazil, as their maintenance costs do not make up for the tax-free status.
 

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VoladordePapantla
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Mexico used to be a clunker paradise and it is still in the US border states :( Anyway, Mexico City, cars after 8 years have a 1 weekday and a monthly saturday restriction, so cars older than 10 years are becoming very rare here.

In Mexico´s bigger cities, cars usually have an 18 year lifespan but some models (specially the ones used as taxis) usually less than 8 years.

Nowadays clunkers are only found in small towns and the US border cities where used cars from the US can be imported cheaply.

Some years ago, there was a boom grey market from used cars from the US, sadly becoming a serious pollution problem.
 

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Depends on the car, but the lifespan of modern cars is usually 10-12 years, about 25 years ago cars were scrapped because of corrosion, nowadays it´s because of electrical failures. If the cost of repairs significantly exceeds the value of the car, then it's no use wasting money fixing it.

The cars with the lowest lifespan are definately Citroen, Renault and Ford.

A 2005 Citroen C5 with 120.000km costs about 4000 EUR in Sweden
A 2002 Citroen C5 with 200.000km costs about 1000 EUR, so when a car is that cheap it's due for the scrapyard. Especially Citroen has issues with the gearbox, the car is not really made to last longer than 200.000km/12 years.
 

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In Russia it's 12 years according to officials.

But Russia is too diverse to use only one average number.

Here are stats by region (it's old numbers, from 2010)The average age is marked in yellow. The oldest cars are in Sakhalin region (19.1 years), the youngest are in Tatarstan Republic (9.1). Next columns are cars by age in percents (less than 5 y.o. | 5-10 | 10-20 | more than 20):
 

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In Russia it's 12 years according to officials.

But Russia is too diverse to use only one average number.

]
Interesting, Tatars wreck their cars quite soon, but in Königsberg motorists drive cautiosly and keep their cars for 19 years.

In Sweden there is a difference between south and north. The oldest cars are to be found in the north, where people take care of their possesions, also the north has the highest numbers of old "fatty" tv-sets.
 

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I don't think it's that easy... It's depends on prosperity of regions. Tatarstan is strong industrial region and it's people can afford to change cars more often. Kalilingrad region as well as the whole far east are not so rich and people simply can't afford a new car here. They are actualy importing used vehicles from Germany (in Kaliningrad) and from Japan/Korea (in Far East), so they simply haven't got any new cars at all. The "wreck" from Tatarstan can be used as "almost new" car in other region :)
 

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I don't think it's that easy... It's depends on prosperity of regions. Tatarstan is strong industrial region and it's people can afford to change cars more often. Kalilingrad region as well as the whole far east are not so rich and people simply can't afford a new car here. They are actualy importing used vehicles from Germany (in Kaliningrad) and from Japan/Korea (in Far East), so they simply haven't got any new cars at all. The "wreck" from Tatarstan can be used as "almost new" car in other region :)
I presume that the number of domestic brands like Volga, GAZ are more common in central Russia than in regions closer to Europe and Asia.

To afford a new domestic brand doesn't mean you can afford a new western brand so the people of Tatarstan may not be more rich than those living close to the Euroasian borders.

For Sweden newer used cars are cheapest in the south and most expensive in the the north. Also because the south attracts import cars
from Continental Europe especially Germany. In the north people are poor by scandinavian standards, no salt on the roads means less corrosion, low population density and small expensive used car market. Also they have a slow life and they don't like changes.

If you are looking for an old SAAB 96, Citroen DS it's a good idea to travel to the north because they have the biggest supply of vintage cars which make them cheaper than in the south.
 

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Cars over a certain age (30?) do not pay the annual tax, and can be considered historical. That being said, old "clunkers" are relatively rare in Brazil, as their maintenance costs do not make up for the tax-free status.
That depends of the stat. In some, only collectors cars (black plates) don´t pay the taxes, the oders pay, even the old ones.
 

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Cars over a certain age (30?) do not pay the annual tax, and can be considered historical.
Same thing in Sweden. Cars older than 30 years=no tax. Very beneficial if you have a diesel car. Diesel car tax is about 450 EUR a year here. So if you find a 1980's MB Diesel you will drive cheap and comfortable.
 

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Nordic region cars among Europe’s oldest

Iceland’s fleet of private cars is older than elsewhere in Europe, with the average car 2 years older than in the EU.

The average age of private cars in Iceland is 10.2 years, according to the newest figures from the Icelandic Roads Administration.

The average age of private cars in EU countries is 8.5 years, according to ACEA figures. Interestingly the average age of Icelandic cars nearly 20 years ago in 1989 was 7.5 years.

In comparison, the average age of cars in the UK is 6.7 years, 7.5 in Italy, 8.1 in both France and Germany, 9.1 in Denmark and 9.4 in Sweden. The Finnish are the only nation surveyed by ACEA with older cars: an average age of 10.5 years.

According to Statistics Norway figures, Norwegian cars are of a similar age to those in Iceland, at 10.3 years.

The impression of some commentators outside of Iceland that every Icelander drives a brand new car bought on credit before the banking crash would appear to be rebuffed by these figures; and it is probably the high rates of tax which encourage Nordic residents to keep their cars on the road slightly longer.
 

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The average age of cars in New Zealand is 13.8 years. This is largely because of people keeping their cars on the road longer as we generally don't like getting rid of things if they aren't broken. We also import a large amount of grey imports from Japan but these imports are restricted to no more than ten years from the year of importation.

In some places, the average age of vehicles is nearly 20 years.
 

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Puerto Rico is full of clunkers, so I'd guess 20+ years. However, that contrasts with our natural tendency to want the newest cars.

So I guess we're exporting a ton of used 7-10 year old cars to latin america and across the Caribbean, and the ones that remain stay.
 
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