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Huntington, Indiana, population 17,450 according to the 2000 census, is the seat of Huntington County.

Around 1970 Huntington, like many towns hoping to revitalize dwindling downtown retail activity, created a pedestrian mall on two or three blocks of Jefferson Street, the main downtown business street. I'd be hesitant to say the mall finished it off, but few traces of the mall remain.










Huntington takes great pride in being the hometown of former Vice President Dan Quayle. Whenever he visits, Nick's Kitchen is the gathering place for Mr. Quayle, his hometown friends and the press.


Downtown has retained quite a few handsome upper-level facades and some beautiful cornices.






I wonder what hides under that metal cladding. I like the jewelry store entrance and marquee a lot.




This is nice; it looks like canal era.


















Huntington was served by two Class I railroads, the Wabash, now Norfolk Southern, and the Erie, later Erie Lackawanna. The Erie Lackawanna didn't make the cut with Conrail and mostly died in 1976; a couple of short lines tried but couldn't make a go of it. Prior to 1916 the Chicago Bluffton & Cincinnati ran parallel with the Erie. It was an ill-starred venture from its beginning, and after it shut down its rolling stock was loaded on a ship for France for use in WWI. The ship was torpedoed in the North Atlantic, and all that remains of the CB&C is somewhere on the bottom of a cold ocean.

The Detroit - Kansas City main line of the former Wabash Railroad, now owned and operated by Norfolk Southern. Many freight trains pass through Huntington every day, but the Wabash Cannonball doesn't run here any more; this was one of the passenger lines that Amtrak declined to pick up in 1971.



Freight house, now a pizza parlor.


Passenger depot.


The Huntington County Courthouse was designed by Vincennes, Indiana, architect John W. Gaddis and built 1901-1906.










It's a well-maintained, handsome building outside and in, and the stained glass and decorative painting are intact and restorable. I like to imagine what a stunning beauty this courthouse could be if restored and made bright again.






The stained-glass dome over the rotunda is lavishly detailed, and deserves some illumination to show it off.






This row of buildings extended across a bridge to the left. I remember being in one, an antique shop, in the mid seventies. One of the buildings collapsed and I think some others were declared unsafe. The bridge has been replaced, and the buildings are gone.




Odd Fellows times two.










The railroad and the river give downtown some angled streets that add character.




The LaFontaine, now senior apartments, was Huntington's finest hotel back in the day; the Wabash Depot was just a scant block away, and the interurban between Fort Wayne and Lafayette with connections to Indianapolis stopped right out front.




Well-kept Romanesque City Hall is right across the street from the LaFontaine.








You'd best behave!


I like the Public Library's industrial motif. Gallery roofs help to distribute natural light to interior areas.


Mmmmmmm!


















Fort Wayne's Wolf & Dessauer had a department store in Huntington in the fifties & sixties.




To become senior housing.


Former home of Our Sunday Visitor and other Catholic publications.








Heading north out of downtown, Jefferson Street rises sharply. St. Mary's Catholic Church and Sts. Peter and Paul, just a couple of blocks away, have a commanding view of the downtown.


Some grand old houses look over downtown from the hill.






It looks like someone is seriously working on this one. It stood vacant and boarded up for many years, but now most of the plywood is gone, replaced with new windows and even some beautiful stained glass.












Saint Marys.




Saints Peter and Paul.


1868 Jessie Davies house - one of the finest Italianate houses I've seen, in a prime location at the corner of Poplar and Tipton Streets overlooking the town.






 

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Looks like the town has alot of quality architecture and alot of character. I swear, Indiana has some of the most beautiful county court houses in the country!
 

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Awesome, that's where I grew up (well, really closer to Roanoke, but spent lots of time in Huntington.) A few comments:

Nick's claims to have invented the breaded tenderloin sandwich. It probably isn't the only place in the state to make that claim, but Nick got his start as a street vendor in 1905 or so.

The downtown is more dead than when I lived there in the 80's and early 90's. Sad, but not surprising.

That canal-era building was my optometrists office. I think the interior was, unfortunately, "modernized".

The former Wolf and Dessauer's was an electronics store in the 80's. Not surprised it's empty now.

Has Our Daily Visitor left Huntington?

I'm so glad that the LaFontaine Hotel is still standing. Most smaller towns struggle to find uses for their old hotels.

Huntington has a great core of buildings. Also, many brick streets surrounding downtown. The town is largely German in ancestry, and the Heidelberg Restaurant is probably still around. Thanks for the trip down memory lane.
 

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Great photos.

Somebody should tell that confederate flag guy he's in a Union state.

How good is the Nick's tenderloin?
 

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Nick's tenderloin is not my preferred style...I like the thicker, juicier tenderloins (jeez that could be a double entendre pretty easily), and Nick's is pounded pretty flat. That said, the place is an institution in the town.
 

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Awesome, that's where I grew up (well, really closer to Roanoke, but spent lots of time in Huntington.) A few comments:

[...]

[...]

Has Our Daily Visitor left Huntington?

... and the Heidelberg Restaurant is probably still around. Thanks for the trip down memory lane.
Our Sunday Visitor is still very much alive, and moved in 1962 from the downtown location to a suburban industrial park location.

The Heidelberg is still in business, and I've heard it's very good. I haven't been there, but I like German food and probably should check it out.

I ran out of time before getting to the Vice Presidential Museum (Dan Quayle) and Huntington University (formerly Huntington College). Maybe I'll get those on another trip; it's only about 25 miles from Fort Wayne.


arenn said:
Somebody should tell that confederate flag guy he's in a Union state.
Confederate battle flags in northern rural small towns don't have anything to do with Southern identity or sympathies. They're the "******* racist white-trash and proud of it" equivalent to rainbow flags.
 

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Our Sunday Visitor is still very much alive, and moved in 1962 from the downtown location to a suburban industrial park location.

The Heidelberg is still in business, and I've heard it's very good. I haven't been there, but I like German food and probably should check it out.

I ran out of time before getting to the Vice Presidential Museum (Dan Quayle) and Huntington University (formerly Huntington College). Maybe I'll get those on another trip; it's only about 25 miles from Fort Wayne.
There's an old monastery on the west side:

http://www.huntingtoncounty.com/remember005.htm
 

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I grew up just around the corner from Huntington too. On the South side of Ft. Wayne - about twenty or thirty miles away from Huntington. Checking out these pictures makes me want to start playing some John Mellencamp! I was watching the 1980's video for "Small Town" a few weeks ago. Any of the many mid sized county seats in Indiana (and probably most of the rest of the Midwest) could fit right in to those videos. Great pictures. Thanks Rob!
 

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If you ever get a chance, it would be great to see pics of Warsaw, In. They have a nice downtown.
I lived in Warsaw for 2 years, and have never lived in such a backwards town my whole life. It's downtown was pretty nice though, especially when the 2 screen movie theater was still there. The lakes make for a pretty setting.

 
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