Skyscraper City Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
okay, the name's a bit annoying.....





Regional Vision Project
I-90 Regional City, Rockford Area Council of 100
The Rockford Area Council of 100, a nonprofit economic development organization, retained Vandewalle & Associates to develop an economic vision for its region in northern Illinois which includes public and private sectors of Boone, Ogle, Stephenson, and Winnebago counties. The project was later expanded to include Rock County in southern Wisconsin. The Project Steering Committee, comprised of public and private sector leaders from the counties, charged Vandewalle & Associates with the following tasks:

Identifying regional opportunities,
Recommending a regional vision and specific projects,
Building regional consensus, and
Identifying potential funding sources.
Identifying Regional Opportunities
During the firm's initial analysis of the four counties, Vandewalle & Associates determined that the project area is strategically located between Chicago to the south, and Madison to the north, with Interstate-90 (I-90) connecting the three areas. Named the I-90 Regional City, it connects the more densely populated Chicago-Rockford-Madison urban corridor to the resource amenities of the central core of the Circle City-Dr. Philip Lewis' urban constellation that includes Chicago, the Quad Cities, Minneapolis, Green Bay, and Milwaukee.

Within the I-90 Regional City is the I-90 Regional Midpoint, which includes the Cities of Janesville and Beloit, Wisconsin and Rockford, Illinois. With a historical skill set that includes manufacturing, agriculture, transshipment, and healthcare, the Regional Midpoint was firmly planted in the old economy. However, as economic trends shifted from these traditional economic drivers to those considered part of the new economy, the economic stability of the Regional Midpoint began to weaken.

Recommending a Regional Vision and Specific Projects
Vandewalle & Associates developed a series of recommendations for both the Regional Midpoint and the Regional City that encourage economic development initiatives, promote regional sustainable development patterns, and strengthen intergovernmental relationships. In addition, Vandewalle & Associates completed a model analysis of key areas to illustrate these recommendations.

Recommendations include:

Branding the I-90 corridor as the Regional City,
Fueling economic growth within the Regional City,
Encouraging the revitalization of downtowns and satellite cities,
Developing existing urbanized areas,
Planning and strategically directing growth,
Capitalizing on existing utility infrastructure,
Commencing comprehensive planning for concentrated investment districts, and
Undertaking a regional rail initiative.
Building Regional Consensus-Regional Leadership Network
To begin building consensus among the many and varied interests within the Regional Midpoint, the Council of 100 created the Regional Leadership Network-a composite of over 1,000 local, county, and state elected officials and staff, as well as leaders from economic development organizations. Vandewalle & Associates developed a series of PowerPoint presentations that delineated project framework and recommendations.

Identifying Potential Funding Sources
In order to implement such sweeping recommendations, Vandewalle & Associates investigated a diverse group of potential funding sources including federal, state, and foundation grants.

Implementation
The Rockford Area Council of 100 has taken recommendations from the Regional Vision Project, and begun forming the strategic task forces to encourage implementation. Priority has been placed on extending commuter rail service to the Regional Midpoint (led by the cities of Belvidere and Rockford), on branding the region, and on establishing a foundation to fund and oversee ongoing implementation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Here's an example of growing commercial links

Amcore Financial has opened its fourth office in Madison, Wis. The Rockford, Ill.-based bank opened a 2,900-square-foot office in the East Park One building.

The new office is part of the company's strategy to expand along the I-90 corridor from the northwestern Chicago suburbs, through Rockford, to Madison.

"We have had great success with opening branches in high growth markets that have a strong demand for our commercial loan, asset management and retail banking products," said Kenneth E. Edge, president and CEO. "We have an excellent team of commercial bankers, who know the Madison market, and can deliver tailored business products to meet the needs of both small business and commercial customers."

Larry Schwenn, a commercial relationship manager, is working at the new office.

"The east side of Madison and its surrounding communities represent and important part of Amcore's growth in the area," said James Hartlieb, Madison market president.

Amcore Financial, with $4.3 billion in banking assets, has 63 offices in Illinois, Wisconsin and Iowa.

Copyright NFR Communications Inc Sep 1-Sep 14, 2002
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
and a sampling of small town growth rates of towns and villages that lie between Rockford and Madison.

Oregon, WI, population 7,514 , is located in Wisconsin's Dane county, about 10.2 miles from Madison and 47.7 miles from Rockford.
Through the 90's Oregon's population has grown by about 66%. It is estimated that in recent years Oregon's population has been growing at an annual rate of 2.1 percent.

McFarland, WI Profile

McFarland, WI, population 6,416 , is located in Wisconsin's Dane county, about 7.0 miles from Madison and 52.2 miles from Rockford.
Through the 90's McFarland's population has grown by about 23%. It is estimated that in recent years McFarland's population has been growing at an annual rate of 3.2 percent.


Brooklyn, WI Profile

Brooklyn, WI, population 916 , is located in Wisconsin's Green county, about 15.3 miles from Madison and 42.7 miles from Rockford.
Through the 90's Brooklyn's population has grown by about 16%. It is estimated that in recent years Brooklyn's population has been growing at an annual rate of 4.1 percent.


Evansville, WI Profile

Evansville, WI, population 4,039 , is located in Wisconsin's Rock county, about 20.9 miles from Madison and 36.7 miles from Rockford.
Through the 90's Evansville's population has grown by about 27%. It is estimated that in recent years Evansville's population has been growing at an annual rate of 1.9 percent.



Edgerton, WI Profile

Edgerton, WI, population 4,933 , is located in Wisconsin's Rock county, about 23.6 miles from Madison and 39.0 miles from Rockford.
Through the 90's Edgerton's population has grown by about 27%.


Clinton, WI Profile

Clinton, WI, population 2,162 , is located in Wisconsin's Rock county, about 23.0 miles from Rockford and 44.8 miles from Madison.
Through the 90's Clinton's population has grown by about 17%. It is estimated that in recent years Clinton's population has been growing at an annual rate of 8.4 percent

Rockton, IL Profile

Rockton, IL, population 5,296 , is located in Illinois's Winnebago county, about 12.6 miles from Rockford and 46.1 miles from Madison.
Through the 90's Rockton's population has grown by about 81%.
Roscoe, IL Profile

Roscoe, IL, population 6,244 , is located in Illinois's Winnebago county, about 10.7 miles from Rockford and 49.8 miles from Madison.
Through the 90's Roscoe's population has grown by about 200%. South Beloit, IL Profile

South Beloit, IL, population 5,397 , is located in Illinois's Winnebago county, about 15.6 miles from Rockford and 44.2 miles from Madison.
Through the 90's South Beloit's population has grown by about 33%.

Loves Park, IL Profile

Loves Park, IL, population 20,044 , is located in Illinois's Winnebago county, about 3.8 miles from Rockford and 54.2 miles from Aurora.
Through the 90's Loves Park's population has grown by about 30%. It is estimated that in recent years Loves Park's population has been growing at an annual rate of 2.5 percent.
 

·
SSLL
Joined
·
8,354 Posts
So would they incorporate some of the cities into one? Or just a regional branding? Is there a need to direct this growth between Chicago and Madison, or is it just to create new jobs/economy? I just don't get the point? May I suggest the name Interstate.
 

·
Rockford, IL
Joined
·
55 Posts
I just looked at Mapquest to see how streched out the I-90 corridor is. The Chicago corridor heading from the circle interchange to the Hwy 47 Huntley-Woodstock exit, is ~47 miles. Then ~21 mile gap to Belvidere with very little development. Then the Rockford corridor- Belvidere to Beloit ~29 miles.

What do you guys think? Will that 21 mile gap along I-90 inbetween the Chicago and Rockford metros be filled in within the next 15-20 years? If so, thats one solid metropolis from the loop, along I-90 traveling NW for nearly 100 miles. I dont know about you guys, but as impressive as that is, it makes me sick.

This isnt even considering the Janesville-Madison corridor, which may fill in within that timeframe as well. That would stretch out the entire I-90 corridor for nearly 150 miles one way from the loop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
no i'm not excited about it. that means urban sprawl. i rather just see chicago and these other cities focus on their own growth and the gap will close when it does. why put a time frame on it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
872 Posts
RockfordSoxFan said:
What do you guys think? Will that 21 mile gap along I-90 inbetween the Chicago and Rockford metros be filled in within the next 15-20 years? If so, thats one solid metropolis from the loop, along I-90 traveling NW for nearly 100 miles. I dont know about you guys, but as impressive as that is, it makes me sick.
I absolutly think that it will be filled in by 2020. Having witnessed the disgusting swath of urban sprawl that is currently choaking Kane and McHenry counties to death for myself, I can honestly say that is probably a conservative estimate.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,217 Posts
Rockford said:
and a sampling of small town growth rates of towns and villages that lie between Rockford and Madison.

Oregon, WI, population 7,514 , is located in Wisconsin's Dane county, about 10.2 miles from Madison and 47.7 miles from Rockford.
Through the 90's Oregon's population has grown by about 66%. It is estimated that in recent years Oregon's population has been growing at an annual rate of 2.1 percent.

McFarland, WI Profile

McFarland, WI, population 6,416 , is located in Wisconsin's Dane county, about 7.0 miles from Madison and 52.2 miles from Rockford.
Through the 90's McFarland's population has grown by about 23%. It is estimated that in recent years McFarland's population has been growing at an annual rate of 3.2 percent.


Brooklyn, WI Profile

Brooklyn, WI, population 916 , is located in Wisconsin's Green county, about 15.3 miles from Madison and 42.7 miles from Rockford.
Through the 90's Brooklyn's population has grown by about 16%. It is estimated that in recent years Brooklyn's population has been growing at an annual rate of 4.1 percent.


Evansville, WI Profile

Evansville, WI, population 4,039 , is located in Wisconsin's Rock county, about 20.9 miles from Madison and 36.7 miles from Rockford.
Through the 90's Evansville's population has grown by about 27%. It is estimated that in recent years Evansville's population has been growing at an annual rate of 1.9 percent.



Edgerton, WI Profile

Edgerton, WI, population 4,933 , is located in Wisconsin's Rock county, about 23.6 miles from Madison and 39.0 miles from Rockford.
Through the 90's Edgerton's population has grown by about 27%.


Clinton, WI Profile

Clinton, WI, population 2,162 , is located in Wisconsin's Rock county, about 23.0 miles from Rockford and 44.8 miles from Madison.
Through the 90's Clinton's population has grown by about 17%. It is estimated that in recent years Clinton's population has been growing at an annual rate of 8.4 percent

Rockton, IL Profile

Rockton, IL, population 5,296 , is located in Illinois's Winnebago county, about 12.6 miles from Rockford and 46.1 miles from Madison.
Through the 90's Rockton's population has grown by about 81%.
Roscoe, IL Profile

Roscoe, IL, population 6,244 , is located in Illinois's Winnebago county, about 10.7 miles from Rockford and 49.8 miles from Madison.
Through the 90's Roscoe's population has grown by about 200%. South Beloit, IL Profile

South Beloit, IL, population 5,397 , is located in Illinois's Winnebago county, about 15.6 miles from Rockford and 44.2 miles from Madison.
Through the 90's South Beloit's population has grown by about 33%.

Loves Park, IL Profile

Loves Park, IL, population 20,044 , is located in Illinois's Winnebago county, about 3.8 miles from Rockford and 54.2 miles from Aurora.
Through the 90's Loves Park's population has grown by about 30%. It is estimated that in recent years Loves Park's population has been growing at an annual rate of 2.5 percent.
That region is quite healthy especially being in the midwest. I could really see a pattern from Madison to Rockford, but its still a long way to go
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Some of you need to remember though that this corridor already has older "urban" enclaves at Rockford,Beloit, and Janesville. The key to sensible growth is to build rail out from Elgin through Rockford-Beloit-Janesville-Madison (and someday on to the Twin Cities.

The point of this is to brand the corridor in order to build such infrastructure. I mean why the hell can one take Amtrak several hundred miles through corn to reach Springfield Champaign etc. when we have over one million people living within a 150 miles of Chicago along a potentially "urban" corridor without train service.

Maybe some of the problem is that Madison doesn't yet see this as a Regional corridor...yet, as it is the Capital of an entire state. The key is Rock County which lies between Mad. and Rockford.

Maybe a better name would be Mad-Rock USA, or Rockison, or Rock-Mad!

Regional City blows. NW Ind already lays claim to The Region.
 

·
C.B.P.
Joined
·
1,188 Posts
Let us keep marching westward. With hard work and perserverance the Quad Cities will be ours! Muahahaha! :horse:

On a serious note what ever happened to the talk about Chicago being a regional bullet train hub? I remeber talk of a mega-underground tranportation center underneath Clinton or Canal Streets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
Why would anyone be excited about Chicago sprawl absorbing Rockford (other than a few douche bags in Rockford who want to erroneously feel that they are part of the "big city")? Why?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
urban sprawl...... ugh.... there is nothing glorious about urban sprawl. they eat up land and resources and spits it out as a run down strip mall. you can have that rockford. or i-90 or whatever you want to name it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
JB_Gold Coast said:
Why would anyone be excited about Chicago sprawl absorbing Rockford (other than a few douche bags in Rockford who want to erroneously feel that they are part of the "big city")? Why?

Please, move to New York. You are an embarrassment to my hometown (yep Chicago. My guess is you are from somewhere else and your "Chicagoness" is an integral part of your shriveled ego)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Questions for JB

What is the Midwest's largest urban area?
What is the Midwest's 2nd largest urban area?
What is the Midwest's most vibrant capital city?


Can you connect the dots?


And JB, what makes you so sure that it isn't Madison and Rockford that will absorb Elgin?

You are a child.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
how about the IQ corridor????

Traveling the I-Q Corridor: Upper Midwest technology future is bright
TEACHING & LEARNING
NEWS & INFORMATION
GREAT SCHOOLS
• News and feature articles
• Great Schools background
• Great Schools Statewide Action Plan
• Parents Place
• Who is Bea Badger?
• Send a Great Schools e-postcard

ALL ABOUT WEAC
ONLINE SERVICES





By Tom Still

Last week found me in both Chicago and Minneapolis, the economic powerhouses that bookend the "I-Q Corridor." It was a reminder that better days lie ahead for Upper Midwest tech companies that have ideas, intellectual property, innovative spirit and investment capital – four of the "I's" in the I-Q.


The fifth is the major highway system that binds Chicago, Milwaukee, the Rockford-Beloit-Janesville area, Madison, the Fox and Chippewa Valleys and the Twin Cities of St. Paul and Minneapolis. Within a span of about 400 miles, which is about 100 miles less than what separates California's high-tech centers of San Diego and San Francisco, lies a significant chunk of the nation's research universities, tech workers and early-stage companies. There's also plenty of capital, although not enough is invested in Midwest companies with marketable products in life sciences, information technology and advanced manufacturing. All of the ingredients for success are here.


Although some people in Wisconsin cling to the belief that economic development is accomplished by Madison bashing Milwaukee or Wausau one-upping Stevens Point, the real competition in the 21st century will take place globally. Identifiable regions such as the I-Q Corridor (where the "Q" stands for quality people, schools, lifestyle and environment) will flourish if they can produce globally competitive goods and services.


Wisconsin can win if it leverages its high-tech resources in a way that compliments what's happening in Chicago and the Twin Cities. The point was hammered home for me in separate trips to both metro areas.


In the Twin Cities, a long history of innovative companies and risk-taking investors has produced one of the nation's leading medical device clusters and leaders in agribusiness and information technology. The Minnesota Miracle may soon extend to biotechnology, due to the emergence of new state initiatives, cooperation between the University of Minnesota and the Mayo Clinic, and a burst of investment in research buildings.


Tech leaders in Minnesota have decided that the next wave of tech success will be interdisciplinary – with biotechnology, medical devices and IT melding into fields such as bioinformatics. That's increasingly the approach in Wisconsin, as well, where the UW-Madison, the Medical College of Wisconsin and the Marshfield Clinic are all taking an interdisciplinary approach to research and company spinoffs.


The Twin Cities may also be on the verge of burying a very old hatchet – the rivalry between St. Paul and Minneapolis – to build a biotech incubator on land that straddles the line between both cities. There's nothing today in Minnesota to match the University Research Park in Madison or the tech transfer ability of the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, but it may only be a matter of time.


In Chicago, the Midwest-Japan Biotechnology Summit provided the latest evidence that the nation's Heartland is becoming a heart-throb for life science investors and companies. Major Japanese pharmaceutical companies such as Fujisawa, Sankyo and Takeda were on hand to explain why they're looking for U.S. partners. And there was no shortage of Midwest biotech companies there to listen.


The meeting, sponsored by the Japan External Trade Organization and about 40 Midwest organizations, demonstrated the global nature of tech-based business. Virtually all of the Japanese companies in attendance have long relationships with U.S. markets and suppliers – and they invest on both sides of the Pacific. Likewise, North American pharmaceutical companies at the Chicago summit said they're working to secure their share of the Japanese market and to invest in its research.


Why are Japanese companies interested in the Midwest? They see it as an emerging cluster of research, workers and start-up companies – and a place where the business deals are less "picked over" than those they may find on the East and West coasts of the United States.


The "I-Q Corridor" is more than a branding slogan. It's a place where Midwest technology, values and people meet the global economy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
and the new Mayor's address

Morrissey supporters celebrate
Cheers, ovations at full City Hall

COLUMNIST: Chuck Sweeny
Morrissey out to alter 'can't do' attitudes


Larry Morrissey's inauguration could be more than a change in political direction. We're about to find out whether it signals an attitudinal shift that goes beyond the walls of City Hall to inspire a vigorous, creative spirit of economic and cultural progress in the Rock River Valley -- on both sides of the border.


As Morrissey took the city's helm, his words revealed his desire to make Rockford the cultural, economic and educational leader it always lacked the guts to be. However, he also warned Rockfordians that he doesn't expect to do big things by himself. Instead, he said, "This is a journey we begin together."


IN A SPEECH we might as well call The Little Engine That Could, the mayor (who has promised commuter trains in four years) told residents they must all join in the effort to reduce crime, improve education and make the city beautiful.



If you think you can, you can. This mayor seems to see himself as the city's life coach.


"Our efforts (as city officials) must be those that unite our people wherever they live and whatever the color of their skin. We must leverage our efforts and our public investments with the efforts of everyone living in our city," Morrissey said.


"Our job as city leaders is to work to develop both the physical capital of this city and the human capital of this city."


To do that, the mayor, who cut his political teeth in grass-roots organizations, said City Hall must enlist "churches, neighborhoods groups, businesses and associations, workers, employers and volunteers, our parents and students and residents throughout the city.


And even our media.” Ah, well maybe not that last one, mayor.
The key to the Rock River Valley’s strength is a strong Rockford, he said.

MORRISSEY’S INDEPENDENT VICTORY, ending 32 years of Democratic mayors, marks one of five, key directional changes since World War II. Here are the others:



In 1957, Ben Schleicher beat incumbent mayor Milton Lundstrom, who was the last of the Swedish-American progressive and socialist mayors who ruled Rockford throughout the 1920s, 1930s, most of the 1940s and 1950s. Schleicher, a west-side alderman, was tapped by conservative, corporate titans eager to squelch the burgeoning union movement and Lundstrom, the unions’ champion.

Schleicher enjoyed the trappings of the mayor’s office. “Mayor Ben” tended to basic city services and left residential, commercial and industrial development to the booming private sector.

But City Hall paid little attention to growing blight on the west and south sides, and downtown began a long slide into oblivion. Rockford failed to modernize its antiquated streets. A referendum to build a civic center on the east bank of the Rock River south of the Jefferson Street bridge failed.


In 1973, educator and east-side alderman Bob McGaw became the city’s first Democratic mayor in modern times. His victory over Schleicher reclaimed the mayor’s office for the union and progressive coalition that backed Lundstrom and earlier, more radical mayors Herman Hallstrom and C. Henry Bloom, both of whom were originally socialists.

McGaw’s eight years were a beehive of activity. He restored rail passenger service in 1974, built the MetroCentre and, with Winnebago County, built the Public Safety Building. McGaw boosted innovative housing programs and aggressively sought federal and state funds for Rockford. He also raised taxes and deferred maintenance of the water system.


In 1981, McGaw didn’t seek a third term and lawyer John McNamara won. He made structural changes at City Hall and wrote pink slips for dozens of workers. Like McGaw, McNamara raised taxes. In reaction to the back-to-back increases of 1982 and 1983, voters threw out Home Rule.

McNamara killed the city-county planning commission, ending most official cooperation between Rockford and Winnebago County.

Although he was a Democrat like McGaw, McNamara ignored party patronage in hiring, which created a rift between his supporters and traditional Democrats. In the 1982 recession, McNamara took a leadership role and explored efforts to diversify the economy from its industrial base. He was re-elected in 1985 by fewer than 200 votes.


In 1989, Charles Box became Rockford’s first black mayor in a campaign in which he stressed his experience as city legal director. Ironically, while Rockfordians were congratulating themselves for their advanced racial views, a group called People Who Care was suing the Rockford School District, charging it with decades of discrimination against blacks. The group won.

Box, elected in a landslide, was more conservative than McNamara, didn’t raise taxes or embark on major spending projects, with the exception of the Coronado Theatre restoration. Doug Scott’s 2001 election had the effect of continuing the Box administration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
Rockford said:
Please, move to New York. You are an embarrassment to my hometown (yep Chicago. My guess is you are from somewhere else and your "Chicagoness" is an integral part of your shriveled ego)
Well, you're wrong on all counts. I'm just trying to figure out why you would expect me to embrace and celebrate the fact that Chicago sprawl might eventually reach the Rockford area. I've got nothing against Rockford, but a large degree of Rockford's growth or projected growth represents Chicago sprawl. In a forum where sprawl is heavily frowned upon, I can't believe you are surprised that some Chicagoans (and no asshole, I'm not from somewhere else) might get a little queasy at the prospect of cookie cutter subdivisions continuously marching across barren flat land until they reach Rockford.
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top