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Lessons for New Delhi from the Nordic capital

There are lessons to be learnt for New Delhi as it prepares to host the 2010 Commonwealth Games. The Games may be five years away but the authorities should take the cue from wherever possible.

Since IOA chief and AFI president Suresh Kalmadi and secretary Lalit Kumar Bhanot — he is also the secretary general of the 2010 Games Organising Committee — are here, they could take note of the Olympic Stadium, the venue for the IAAF World Championships for Athletics commencing Saturday.

It looks very compact and precise for the occasion, unlike the Nehru Stadium. The cost of maintenance is cheap and the upkeep is excellent.

The strength of the stadium is the atmosphere created by traditional surroundings. The small stadium also adds to the advantage of the media working with a tight schedule. From the media stands there is an adequate view over of the field and at a short distance is the ’Mixed Zone’ where the athletes can be interviewed. The huge area surrounding the stadium has been put to optimum use with tents pitched up to cater to the needs of all and sundry.

Each tent, hired out to various television and sponsors’ agencies, also bring in revenue for the organisers. What makes the Nordic capital different from New Delhi or any other metro in India is the planning that has gone into it making the city beautiful.

Besides the natural beauty — this port city is lush green with trees all around — neat concrete roads, and clover-leaf formations incorporated into the three-tier ring road system and, above all, well-coordinated traffic makes traveling almost a pleasure. Decongestion and non-polluted traffic is the watchword.
 

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SDAT Tennis Statium , venue of CHENNAI OPEN ATP Tournament

Chennai is the home and birthplace of some of India's greatest tennis players Vijay Amritraj, Mahesh Bupathi and the Krishnans. Leander paes did his schooling here, and also trained at the Britannia Amritraj Trust.


 

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Perhaps this series can resurrect this thread.

The Times of India is starting a series of articles in which they rate the various sports stadiums in the country, and they have started with the Eden Gardens in Kolkata.

This is from the ePaper section.

BIG GROUND, BIGGER PROBLEMS

In the first part of a series,TOI visits the country’s pride among stadiums,The Eden Gardens in Kolkata, and returns unhappy

By Dwaipayan Datta/TNN

It rates among the best in the world. The imposing amphitheatre of steel and concrete encasing Eden Gardens’ lush green outfield still inspires awe among cricketers and fans.

But years of neglect by powerdrunk officials has ensured that watching cricket at this illustrious ground isn’t quite as enjoyable as it used to be.
Myopic administrators, with an eye on the big bucks, have been quick off the blocks to install floodlights and other gizmos like an electronic scoreboard and a giant video screen, but they have not spared a thought for the 90,000-odd spectators who pack the stands.

The biggest letdown for a fan at the Eden is the sitting arrangement. The rows of concrete seats in most galleries are far from comfortable, with hardly any legspace. Getting in and out can be a nightmare, especially if you have a seat in the middle of a row. Torn trousers and scraped knees are commonplace.

CAB authorities, who have built a swanky Club House, a hanging media box and air-conditioned boxes, have never bothered about spectator comfort. Obviously, attendances have dwindled.

Officials seem to have finally woken up to the reality. A couple of blocks have been revamped and fibre-glass seats have been installed. If the authorities are to be believed, all blocks will have fibre-glass seats by the 2011 World Cup, if the joint bid by Asia is successful. Bucket seats require more space, so Eden will lose about 10,000 seats, but what good is additional capacity if it remains unutilised?

The resultant loss of revenue is sure to be made up by hiking ticket prices. More expensive tickets, though, won’t ensure extra comfort, especially for over 50 per cent of spectators who have to sit in the open sun.

What makes life more difficult for the fans who brave the heat to come to the ground is that they are not allowed to carry waterbottles into the stadium. Waterpouches aren’t easily available and there are long queues at the drinking water outlets.

However, when it comes to ground and dressing room facilities, Eden Gardens still remains one of the best. In fact, it can easily be said that Eden Gardens is more player-friendly than spectator-friendly.
Access to ground
Located in the heart of the city, the stadium is well-connected by road, rail and water transport. Metro Railway is just 500 metres away. Not a modern stadium with ramps for easy crowd dispersal, but with 21 entry points, getting in and out is not a problem.
TOI Rating 8/10

Water & food
Water bottles are not allowed inside the stadium and usually there are long queues in front of the water pouch counters and drinking water taps. The quality of food available in the stadium is poor and the few stalls selling mostly stale stuff are inadequate.
TOI Rating 4/10

Seating comfort
The rows of narrow concrete benches with hardly any leg-space are extremely uncomfortable. You are liable to scrape your knees while getting in or out of the row. The price of tickets in blocks with bucket seats is high, making it unaffordable for the masses.
TOI Rating 2/10

Toilets
Grossly inadequate toilet facilities in all blocks, including the Club House. For a stadium this big, there are very few of them. Moreover, the existing toilets are not clean and often run out of water midway into the game. As a result, they are extremely dirty and unhygienic.
TOI Rating 3/10

Roof overhead
Fifty per cent of the stands enjoy overhead covering by fibre-glass sheets. The worst sufferers are the spectators in D and J blocks, who have no shade. The chances of building shades in these two stands are slim due to technical reasons.
TOI Rating 5/10

Outfield and pitch
Lush green outfield resembles a green carpet. Traditionally, the Eden pitch has been a sporting one, aiding swing bowlers early in the game, and subsequently breaking up to help spinners. More often than not, Test matches here have produced results.
TOI Rating 9/10

Player facilities
Big and comfortable dressing rooms where the players can put their feet up and relax. Single entry point helps in enforcing stricter security. No unwanted elements can go near the dressing rooms. The CAB medical unit is well-equipped and manned by doctors.
TOI Rating 7/10

 

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y'all hyderabadis, get some pics of the stadiums from Hyd. the city has a lot of stadiums and ofcourse the newly built Visakha (Rajiv Gandhi?) cricket stadium.
 

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nice pictures Hindustani.

meanwhile, here is the second stadium in the ToI series of stadium reviews. This time it is the Madhavrao Scindia Cricket Ground, Rajkot, Gujarat.

SAD PLIGHT AT HOME OF RANJI

BCCI Secretary Niranjan Shah Can’t Do Anything About The Sorry Plight Of The Stadium On His Home Turf

By Lionel Rodricks/TNN

The Rajkot Municipal Stadium, which was grandiosely re-christened Madhavrao Scindia Cricket Ground recently, is a challenge to afficionados of the game, players and the media alike. It tests everybody’s patience, staying powers and sensibilities to the limit.

The facilities it provides during a Oneday match are depressingly sub-standard and a large number of fans in Rajkot and towns around it say they prefer to watch games on TV.

It’s a crying shame that the best available cricket ground in the region, which had produced the legendary Ranjitsinhji and Duleeepsinhji, should be in such ragged condition. Despite making handsome profits, the Saurashtra Cricket Association (SCA) has done precious little to upgrade the venue. And when you consider that the secretary of the SCA is also the secretary of the BCCI, it makes you wonder.

The ground is small and was apparently built to stage minor tournaments. There is hardly any space between the boundary line and the sitting area. Fielders on the periphery, in fact, have to be very careful about running into people so they often give up the chase a little earlier. The smallness also results in bigscoring, which gives a deceptive idea of batsmens’ prowess.

The saving grace is that the stadium is centrally located, but other factors overshadow this convenience. The good name of Scindia, the former president of the BCCI, is defiled by this dusty, Lilliputian cricket centre, which has had the privilege of hosting some of the biggest names in the game.

The pavilion here is so small and bad that when all the players and officials gather in the dressing rooms, the place resembles a Mumbai local railway platform at peak hour; the food and water facilities are woefully insufficient and the seating arrangements are designed to give the spectator a back and a neckache well before the match has reached its conclusion.

The SCA does not own the stadium, which belongs to the Rajkot Municipal Corporation (RMC), and so the ground is rented out for social activities, where mandaps and the like are constructed on the playing area. The field is thus dug up frequently and though the authorities do a decent repair job, the permanent damage cannot be completely mended.

The platforms on which the TV camera people stand all day look like they will collapse any moment. The scoreboards are small and belong to a different, ancient era.

“Since the venue belongs to the municipal corporation the BCCI does not provide us with maintenance money like it does for venues that own their grounds,’’ says Bharat Shah, president of the SCA.

But this excuse is specious, to say the least. He is mum about the money earned from ODIs. A part of the profits could certainly be used for upgrading the venue. Shah adds: “We are building our own stadium. It will be ready in about two years.’’

TOI RATINGS

2/10 Access to the ground
The stadium is centrally located but there is only one, small gate which is the only entry - and exit - point. There is much pushing and jostling to get in, and then some squeezing and twisting to reach your seat. There aren’t enough ushers or ground personnel in case one requires help.

2/10 Water and food availability
One fan told the TOI: “We are not allowed to carry anything inside the venue — and we get nothing inside!’’ Spectators have to make their way outside the ground, through that little exit gate, to quench their thirst or whet their appetites. Which is easier said than done. The fare available during the break is also of poor quality.

3/10 Seating comforts
The seats are hard and most are even rickety. The SCA president says: “If we put sofas then we will have to accommodate a smaller crowd. As it is, this ground has a poor capacity — 13-14,000.’’ To compound matters, the chairs are tightly squeezed into a small area and sitting in the cramped place becomes an ordeal for the cricket lover.

2/10 Toilets
Two young women of Rajkot confessed to the TOI that they do not go to the Madhavrao Scindia ground because the temporary toilets constructed during matches make for embarrassing scenes. Even the permanent toilets, in the pavilion and dressing rooms, are poorly maintained and difficult to access. There is no concrete, permanent urinal outside the pavilion — where more than 95% of the crowd sits.

6/10 Overhead protection
Apparently costs are uppermost in the minds of the organisers when contracts are given, for the stands and shades for spectators provide minimum of protection from the sun. The conditions in the stands exemplify the indifference that many cricket associations have for the paying public.

5/10 Outfield and pitch
The main pitch is full of runs and good for ODIs but the outfield has become uneven and rough because of non-cricket activities on the ground. The practice pitches are too few and in a shabby state. Consequently, nets the day before a match are an exercise that the teams go through just for the sake of it.

3/10 Dressing rooms and facilities for players
The pavilion isn’t a pavilion in the conventional sense of the word. It’s a concrete structure that has two rooms (dressing rooms), a minuscule balcony, two other compartments for TV and radio. It’s obvious that when it was built, and renovated over the years, neither was any foresight applied nor a professional engaged to see that the players, umpires, officials and media persons needs were catered to.

The small ground at Rajkot ensures a free-for-all even before a game starts. Spectators are almost within handshaking distance from players at training sessions. Please take a look at the nets.


This story and another story i posted in another thread of the KD Singh Babu stadium in Lucknow tell me something. Both the stadiums are owned by the municipal corporations respectively, and since we know municipalities have no money, they can't do anything to maintain it. In case of UP, they didnt let the cricket association hold two important matches for some stupid egoistic reason.

of course, the other sad situation is when sports associations prefer to spend all the money they earn on themselves rather than the athletes and facilities, and this is the case all over the country. And this is BCCI, the supposed puppetmaster of international cricket. One cant be blamed for wondering where all the millions earned go.

And notice the sad state of affairs when it comes to toilets everywhere. crying shame.
 

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A TIMES INITIATIVE

Fake VIP syndrome Kotla’s bane

Ferozeshah Kotla, Delhi In the Rajdhani, things are looking up now, but the freeloader culture remains an irritant

By Partha Bhaduri/TNN

New Delhi: The Ferozeshah Kotla, as it stands today, is a strange blend of antiquity and modernity. While the mausoleum of Ferozeshah nearby casts a historical shadow over the stadium, a brand new structure indicates how times have changed.

As is true with most Indian grounds, Kotla too has its quota of problems. To begin with, dangerously jutting steel pillars and ubiquitous construction rubble have been an eyesore for close to three years now. On the other hand, Kotla probably ranks marginally higher on the comfort scale, but that’s only because facilities provided to spectators at other key cricket venues across the country are abysmal.

The biggest problem, though, lies elsewhere: The frenetic clamour for passes, or complimentary tickets, before every international game. This awful practice is institutionalised, forcing even Delhi and District Cricket Association (DDCA) president Arun Jaitley to comment on the eve of the recent India-England One-dayer that Delhi’s bigwigs should get into the habit of buying tickets. It hasn’t made an iota of difference, of course. Hordes of freeloaders throng the stands and premium boxes. The association maintains that its hands are tied. ‘‘These are influential people who ask for free entry,’’ a senior officebearer told TOI. ‘‘How do you expect us to refuse them? This is Delhi after all!’’

The end result? Only 20,000 tickets went on sale for the general public during the India-England One-dayer last month, with an equal number of obligatory passes reserved for the VVIPs, DDCA club members, police, fire department and MCD officials, and their kith and kin. ‘‘Delhi people should get out of this fake VIP syndrome,’’ says an incensed Jaitley. But the problems starts from within. DDCA officials themselves distribute their quota of 4500 passes any which way they like.

This maddening propensity has assumed epidemic proportions, so much so that legitimate tickets often remain unsold, or sell for ridiculously low prices outside the stadium gate on the day of a game. On March 28, for example, tickets worth Rs 1,000 were selling for as low as Rs 300, and a ground-in-charge was even apprehended trying to smuggle in people. All this happens even as many bonafide ticket holders cannot even enter the ground.

However, circumstances leading up to that One-dayer proved that even the faction-ridden DDCA could close ranks and work overtime when confronted with a crisis situation. They somehow managed to speed up the stadium reconstruction work, which is already running way behind schedule, but it remains to be seen how the ordinary spectator will benefit. The common explanation provided is the claustrophobic security, which prevents spectators from carrying in eatables, water bottles or even mobile phones. Then, there is this cramped seating in what can often be searing hot weather. The renovation has gobbled up an astronomical Rs 500 million so far (by conservative estimates), and more money is required.

But the DDCA is talking big, claiming it wants to revolutionise the way the game is watched here. Vice-president Chetan Chauhan agrees that facilities are a far cry from what he calls the “relaxed picnic-like environment” present at grounds in Australia, New Zealand or even South Africa. “Our longterm aim is to bring about comprehensive change. We want to ensure that no spectator has to sit out in the sun,” he said.

TOI RATINGS

Access to the ground

While it’s centrally located, traffic snarls occur often on big matchdays. Parking your car and getting inside are problem areas too. However, for a teeming metro, access to Kotla is ok. And if you know the right people, or are willing to part with some money, you can be escorted in without any hassle.
6/10

Water and food availability

Like all other Indian grounds, there is a big question mark here, but judging by the last game, things are looking up somewhat despite security c o n s t r a i n t s . Spectators are still not allowed to carry in anything, but special food courts have been set up at reasonable prices at all floors and drinking water arrangements are also better. For the corporate boxes and those availing of VVIP benefits, there is no trouble at all, with even liquor flowing freely. 6/10

Seating comfort
As good, or as bad, as elsewhere. There’s fixed seating availability now in place of the rented chairs on offer earlier, but leg room is minimal, unless you are sitting in one of the 43 corporate boxes, of course. 5/10

Toilets
The less said the better. Looking on the brighter side, however, at least they are there. Many women avoid turning up because of this very problem. Men don’t care; they can take a leak anywhere. 2/10

Overhead protection
The top tiers are all uncovered for now, apart from the Old Club House end, which houses the corporate boxes, the VVIP enclosure and the press box. The DDCA plans to change all that in the future and cover everything. 5/10

Outfield and pitch
There’s been more controversy of late on that account, with India playing Pakistan on an underprepared pitch last year. But the strip has been under supervision of the BCCI pitch official Daljit Singh and things looked up against Sri Lanka last December, or against England more recently. The pitch is a bit on the slow side, however, and is occasionally two-paced. ICC match referee Clive Lloyd doesn’t like it though. Outfield, however, looks better with the new Bermuda grass.
5/10


Dressing room


One area where the DDCA definitely scores over the competition. The new pavilion is a player’s dream, with centralised AC, a massage parlour and spacious arrangements. 7/10

 

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Asia will host the 2011 Cricket World Cup.

India, Pak, SL, B'desh will host it jointly.

the Asian bid won by a 10-3 margin.
 

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todays stadium, Green Park, Kanpur, Ulta Pradesh. Problems: The same.

GREEN PARK KANPUR

WRAPPED IN RED TAPE

Regular Test Centre Battles For Survival


By Santosh Suri/ TNN

It’s one of the five ‘permanent Test centres’, as a Test used to be played here every time there was a fivematch series in the years gone by. That’s the only claim to fame for Green Park Stadium in Kanpur.

The erstwhile Mody Stadium has had a chequered past and every time an international match comes about, its fitness and standards are questioned. So much so that matches have been shifted out on a couple of occasions.

The basic problem with Green Park is that it’s a government-owned ground. Thus every time there is an international match, UPCA has to run to the state government to get the stadium allotted. UPCA has, over the years, invested heavily in expansion, renovation and maintenance of the Green Park, instead of opting for their own stadium. That would have solved most of UPCA’s problems. But they slept over the matter.

Now, the state government is using the allotment of stadium to browbeat the UPCA so that the backers of the present government can gain control of the state body.

UPCA has taken legal recourse to get out of the net the UP government has cast by bringing in the state sports bodies registration act.

Reacting strongly to the move, UPCA withdrew membership from the Cooperative Societies Act (state subject) and re-registered itself under the Company’s Act which is governed by the Centre.

This has not gone down well with the UP government, which is now using the allotment of the stadium as a stick to beat the state body into submission.

It has also slapped a recovery notice on the UPCA for the use of floodlights during the Test match with South Africa. Due to fog and poor light the floodlights were used for an hour or so on four days.

The state government is demanding Rs 20 lakh at the rate of Rs 5 lakh per day! Being a defaulter, UPCA was asked to pack its bags on the eve of the inter-state one-day final which was ultimately played in Mumbai.

UPCA have been requesting state government to lease out the stadium so that they can bring it to international standards. But the government is neither leasing it out nor has the ability or the will to carry out the renovation.

Access to ground
Parking arrangements are poor. Despite 14 entry points, crowd dispersal is not easy. Police apathy usually leaves a lot of ticket-holders in the lurch
TOI ratings: 4/10

Water and food
Water & eatables aren’t allowed in the stadium. The food is pathetic and not adequate to cater to the fans
TOI ratings: 4/10

Seating comfort
Spectators are made to sit on concrete slabs and are crammed like sardines. The tickets in stands with bucket seats are too expensive for the masses
TOI ratings: 2/10

Toilets
Outer walls of the stadium come handy here. The toilets are not clean and most of the time without water, making them totally unhygienic
TOI ratings: 3/10

Overhead protection
Barring the pavilion and media centre, there is no overhead covering and no effort is made to provide temporary shade by putting up shamianas
TOI ratings: 3/10

Outfield and pitch
Efforts have been made in earnest to improve the outfield and the pitches
TOI ratings: 5/10

Dressing-room
Single entry point helps in enforcing tight security. But umpires and other officials don’t have it so good.
TOI ratings: 5/10


NO GREEN REVOLUTION HERE: The state government is using the allotment of the Green Park Stadium as a stick to beat UPCA into submission.
 

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A TIMES INITIATIVE

PCA, MOHALI
Where spectators express gratitude
A refreshing change

By Tapan Joshi/TNN

If you are an Indian spectator, the Punjab Cricket Associaton Stadium at Mohali is a refreshing change. At times it makes one wonder: Is the venue really a part of the cricket landscape in India?

After all, there aren’t too many venues in the country where the police act as guides to the spectators instead of wielding the lathi.

Understandably, the fanmail commending the organisational skills of the PCA is often on a high. The English spectators noted that their Mohali experience was akin to watching a game of cricket in Sydney or Melbourne. One fan from Pakistan sent a gratitude note along with a cheque of Rs 20,000 in favour of PCA, saying it was much better than watching cricket in England.

Every stand has proper toilet facilities. The toilets are never found short of running water, something that the PCA officials are very proud about. Attendants man these toilets throughout the duration of the match.
The players too enjoy themselves thoroughly at this venue. Indian skipper Rahul Dravid has gone on record as saying: “It is one of the best venues in India and we are very well looked after here. One feels like returning time and again.’’

TOI RATINGS
Access to the ground
Once near the stadium, access is smooth, although parking can often be a headache. 7/10

Water & food availability
Food and refreshment stalls are found in abundance in all the stands, and none of the items are over-priced. 9/10

Seating comfort
Nothing extraordinary, but it is much better than the other centres in the country. 5/10

Toilets
Every stand has spacious ladies and gents toilets. Running water and soap are always found and all toilets are consistently maintained and clean. 8/10

Overhead protection
Not there in the stands. Only the corporate boxes and the VIP enclosure have it. 3/10

Outfield and pitch
Excellent cricket pitch and an equally good outfield. 7/10

Player facilities
Right from the dressing rooms’ location to the pantry with chefs ready to cater to any culinary demand of the players, the PCA is in a league of its own. 9/10

We must be having the least bank balance amongst all state associations because we believe in spending the money to give the spectators more comfort.

 

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This is a gud news....

Delhi set for a new cricket stadium

New Delhi: The Board of Control for Cricket (BCCI) in India has proposed an international stadium in New Delhi for the 2011 Cricket World Cup that will be hosted jointly by India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh.

The new stadium, to be built on a 30-acre land allotted to the BCCI by the Delhi Development Authority at Maharani Bagh near Noida Bridge, would be owned by the BCCI.

ICC regulations requires that the stadium should be clean to hold World Cup matches, whereas Ferozshah Kotla, owned by the Delhi District Cricket Association, has corporate insignia all around the ground.

"Probably we will have a new stadium by 2011, owned by the Board," Pawar said. It will be of international standards having an indoor academy, a club house and residential arrangements among other facilities," Pawar said.

Whenever complete, it would probably be the first stadium owned by the BCCI.

The plan, however, has been there for at least four years now. "The land was allotted when Arun Jaitley was a Union Minister in the BJP government," the BCCI chief said.

On April 30 the International Cricket Council had announced that the 2011 tournament would be held in Asia.

The 2015 edition will be co-hosted by Australia and New Zealand while the 2019 tournament would be held in England.
Source: IBNLIVE
 

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pawar had talked about a huge new stadium for bombay last year as well. i would take everything this new admin says with a big pinch of salt. they have promised much but so far have only concentrated on making more and more money

bombay anyways already has two test grounds with two new ones in bandra-kurla and new bombay ready. it seems like overkill to have 5 test grounds in one city. better they concentrate on making the bandra-kurla one a really world class venue. the wankhede is pathetic while the brabourne is real class but privately owned by the cci
 

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Jawahar Lal Nehru Stadium--New Delhi--India (95,000 Capacity)

Bombay Boy............................Bombay's both cricket stadia are of "extremely substandard" quality I believe in terms of seating arrangement, size, facilities and parking. These two Bombay cricket stadia are only good enough to play club cricket or Ranjis. My point is when a city like Melbourne with barely 5 million population can have a 100,000 seater worlds best state-of-the-art cricket stadium, why cant an Indian city with 18 million population have a 150,000 seater state-of-the-art stadium.











 

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It was really a good news that Delhi is getting an exclusive Cricket stadium.!!!.. Now if the responsible people are really interested, they should know that they really have a very very good chance in their hand to create a world class cricket stadium.

I am posting an image of Baseball stadium, But it will be great if they make something like this for Cricket..

 
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