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Cory
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Naptown said:
Shit, hopefully they will make an attempt to build something urban, especially compared to their past works at the two stores on 10th.

Well, since Heron-Morton and the Old Northside are both IHPC governed areas, they will have to go through the review process with them and parking will have to be in the rear!
 

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cwilson758 said:
One thing I think is cool about Indy is that we don't have 5, 6, or 7 new residential projects going in, but rather 20, 21, or 22 +!! No, they may not all be flashey 30-story condo towers, but we have quality developments going in everywhere in all parts of our downtown.
That's great and all, but I've gotta think that that's what is slowing down big projects like One Market Square. After all, why buy something you'll have to wait a few years to move into... if ever.. when you can buy a nice unit at Mill no. 9 or some such..

Ah well, I suppose I should be patient, but I see a lot more room for low rise developement on the East side of downtown before high rise living becomes commonplace down here. Look at how many vacant lots are in the Holy Cross area and how many sparsely used parking lots surround Market street and to the north downtown..
 

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cwilson, do you know why the neighbors don't want mid-rise/high-rise bldgs? did they even see a design?
 

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nevermind, by looking at the neighborhood's webiste, i see they are 110% about historic preservation...which is good.
 

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GT said:
cwilson, do you know why the neighbors don't want mid-rise/high-rise bldgs? did they even see a design?
While I believe there will be some more mid and high rise buildings built on the Eastside of downtown, I don't see that many in the future. The Southside of downtown has a little room to grow for mixed use, but there are historical issues there as well.. It's got to be expensive to build in the Wholesale District with the architectural limitations.

However, look at the area north of the Capitol and the AUL building, and east of the Canal... Block after block after block of nothing but HUGE parking lots and low rise light industrial. If I had to bet, I'd say that that is where the future modern high rise office buildings will be, and perhaps the greatest opportunities for daring contemporary architecture.
 

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thehoss257 said:
At Pan Am Plaza, I suggest a site plan that would create a new more enclosed plaza. The southern building in the Pan Am complex could be razed to make way for a more cohesive plan. I also suggest five to ten story setbacks on any new buildings to tie them to other buildings in the Wholesale District. (Though I’m not sure if that area is actually included in that district)

These images illustrate what I mean by a more enclosed plaza space. By the way, I am not saying this is what the plaza should look like. I just want to see the city do some place making at the site. It would be a disapointment if the hotel were just plopped onto the existing plaza creating a compromized building and plaza (i.e. The Simon Building)
If you're thinking of tearing down the South ice rink, there are issues with that. The World/Indiana Skating Academy is located there, and is quite a feather in the city's hat. No chance we'd consider risking losing them. Pan Am Plaza is enhanced by having skaters from all over the world hanging about also. It adds a lot of color to the area.

http://www.iwsa.org/

I agree that there is much wrong with the Simon tower (although It certainly could have been worse) but just because compromises may have to be made, it won't necessarily equate to bad architecture. Great Artists and Architects love limitations after all. Some great towers were seemingly impossible because of the limitations put on them... The Citigroup Center in New York had to be built over a cathedral after all.... Not that I'd want a tower like that there.

All we have to do is ensure a great architect is hired...
 

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cwilson758 said:
If you recall, there had orignally been a 10-15-story tower planned a few years ago, but the NIMBY's shot that down. Which, shows some of the ignorance of the neighborhood considering the area is sprinkled with highrises. Anyway...
According to some Lockerbie newsletter, the reason why the project didn't go forward was because they werent able to fill the office space...

“North Lockerbie” was to have included 62,000 square feet of office space, 26,000-square-feet of streetlevel retail space, and 83 housing units including a 10-story residential tower. The project also included an underground
parking garage under the entire site. That project was driven by the office space needs of the Young & Laramore advertising agency, headquartered
on Massachusetts Avenue. “North Lockerbie” was first unveiled in January 2001 but killed about a year later when an unnamed partner that had committed to much of the office space pulled out of the project.


http://www.lockerbiesquare.org/FEB05dinmont.pdf

Here is a rendering of that project that is on Emporis...
 

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cwilson758 said:
today there was a "retreat" for the members of the IRTC (Indianpolis Regional Transportation Council). The main topic was funding. The mayor appears to be shooting for the 2007 Session to get funding in place from the State and again, appears to be asking for 100% local funding. Anyway, I wanted to let you know that we have a "working" timeline that calls for the system to be operational by 2012; however, this of course is contingent on funding. More than likely a regional tax (similar to the stadium deal) would have to be implemented to get the $4 billion needed. I mentioned going after some of the Governor's "Major Moves" money and the mayor seemed open to that. That is all I have right now, but as I have mentioned, really expect this to become a hot topic in the coming months.
Thanks for the info. 2012 sounds very ambitious, but I'm glad the mayor is pushing hard for this. Are officials from the doughnut counties as gung-ho about this as Peterson is?

There better be some "major moves" money going towards mass transit in Indy. Instead of widening I-69 to 12 freaking lanes, I wish that money would be spent on a transit line along I-69.
 

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The NIMBYs lose again! Did anyone see the renderings of the project on WTHR yesterday? I am perplexed to how anyone could be opposed to the design of the project. The way some people are talking about the project, they make is seem that Kosene is building a 20 story, vinyl clad tower.


Broad Ripple residents oppose condo project

Broad Ripple, Feb. 1 - Just south of Broad Ripple Village, adjacent to the Monon Trail in an area marked by small cottages and bungalows are signs of protest over a proposed development.

The location is a one and one-half acre site in the 6100 block of Winthrop.

"This is a low density neighborhood and this is a high density condo," points out Peter Dean.

Kosene Acquisitions wants to tear down some one story duplexes and an adjacent house and build 28 upscale town homes with garages and surface parking.

Stephen Mears is the attorney for Kosene Acquisitions. "It's going to help the tax base, be much more attractive and bring ownership into the area whereas now they're mainly renters."

But Dean and others say the multi-family project will stick out and change the character of the neighborhood. "So when you drive down this street, if you'll pardon the expression, it will look like a wart on a witch's nose."

Several businesses also oppose the development, saying it just doesn't fit with Broad Ripple.

"It has to do with density and setbacks." Linda Shikany owns Marigold, there for 16 years, she likes the area's unique qualities. "We welcome development, but let it be within the character and within the plan the city adopted in 1997."

Still, Kosene, which built the popular Monon Row condos to the north, believes the project will only improve the neighborhood. "It's not in character in that it's in fact new and it's ownership versus rental and more dense, but we feel it works well with the older apartments across the trail."

The Metropolitan Development Commission approved the plan 4-3.

http://www.wthr.com/Global/story.asp?S=4442297
 

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Resurgent Fountain Square

Realtor Phil Barcio lives just down the street from two of the homes his client has on the market on Prospect Street, a block east of Fountain Square.

The two English cottages just southeast of Downtown are selling together for $108,900 -- a bargain if you're in the market for a fixer-upper in a rebounding eclectic neighborhood, said Barcio of Century 21 Scheetz group.

Some think Fountain Square is poised to become the next happening residential neighborhood, with its historic homes and growing arts and antiques district. But with residents acknowledging that as many as 30 percent of the homes in the area are not "rehab-friendly," the neighborhood still has a way to go.

Backed with a $500,000 federal grant, Fountain Square's commercial area is about to get a little sprucing up. Building facades will get a facelift, and a new fountain, sidewalks and streetlamps will be installed. Barcio hopes the residential market will follow suit.

Fountain Square in recent years has been home to eclectic stores and entertainment, with vintage resale and antique shops and rare hobbies. One neighborhood pastime is duckpin bowling in the Fountain Square Theater Building. Swing dancing is also a favorite on weekends in the theater building.

The neighborhood developed from a 264-acre plat purchased by Calvin Fletcher. By the 1870s, a railway and an influx of German merchant immigrants left the commercial square bustling.

At the turn of the century, Fountain Square began to play a leading role in the Indianapolis theater community, maintaining more stages than any other area in the city until the 1950s.

Three decades of decline ensued after the construction of I-65 bisected the community from Downtown, and hundreds of homes were torn down in the 1970s. Suburban flight also left many homes vacant.

But in the past few years the real estate market has started to pick up, and Barcios' home is proof. Barcio and his wife Audrey said when they had their home appraised in 2005 its value had increased 16 percent in just one year.

Some of Barcio's clients have similar stories. A $70,000 home bought by a couple looking for a fixer-upper close to Downtown recently sold for $128,000 -- after investing $5,000 and a lot of elbow grease in improvements.

"The area offers young couples homes close to Downtown rehab possibilities," he said. " As much as 30 percent of the area houses aren't rehab-friendly and could be torn down for new luxury homes attractive to the younger buyer."

Paul Baumgarten, director of Fountain Square Main Street, acknowledges that the community has a certain edge to it.

"A lot of the time people hang on to the opinion of the Fountain Square they knew 15 or 20 years ago, or they let the edgy reputation precede itself a little too much," he said.

The neighborhood has a personality for the arts. It is home to the Wheeler and Murphy Art Center as well as various galleries, luring artists to the area.

The art extends beyond the canvas in the community with ethnic foods. Diners can watch belly dancers over an appetizer of flaming cheese at Santorini's Greek Kitchen. During seasonable weather, the Shelbi Street Cafe's rooftop dining and cocktails are a local favorite.


Fountain Square
• Location: Southeast of Downtown.
• Commute to Downtown: 10 minutes or less.
• Home prices: $50,000 to $110,000.
• History: Fountain Square began with a 264-acre farm plat purchased by Calvin Fletcher in 1835. The original settlement was residential, but by the 1860s a commercial sector was developing with the aid of the Citizen's Street Railway Co. laying tracks down Virginia Avenue and Shelby and Prospect streets.

In the early 1900s, Fountain Square began to play a role in the Indianapolis theater scene. From 1910 to 1950, the neighborhood contained more theaters and playhouses than any other area of the city.

• Home styles: English and Victorian cottages, duplexes, American Four Square variations.
• Schools: George Washington Carver School 87, Southeast Neighborhood School of Excellence.
• Neighborhood associations: Fountain Square Main Street, Fletcher Place Association and Fountain Area Community Team.


A new attitude: Houses are for sale on Prospect Street. Fountain Square is on the rebound, including use of a $500,000 grant to spruce up its commercial area.

http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060128/BUSINESS/601280413/1003
 

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KM1410 said:
The NIMBYs lose again! Did anyone see the renderings of the project on WTHR yesterday? I am perplexed to how anyone could be opposed to the design of the project. The way some people are talking about the project, they make is seem that Kosene is building a 20 story, vinyl clad tower.


Broad Ripple residents oppose condo project

Broad Ripple, Feb. 1 - Just south of Broad Ripple Village, adjacent to the Monon Trail in an area marked by small cottages and bungalows are signs of protest over a proposed development.

The location is a one and one-half acre site in the 6100 block of Winthrop.

"This is a low density neighborhood and this is a high density condo," points out Peter Dean.

Kosene Acquisitions wants to tear down some one story duplexes and an adjacent house and build 28 upscale town homes with garages and surface parking.

Stephen Mears is the attorney for Kosene Acquisitions. "It's going to help the tax base, be much more attractive and bring ownership into the area whereas now they're mainly renters."

But Dean and others say the multi-family project will stick out and change the character of the neighborhood. "So when you drive down this street, if you'll pardon the expression, it will look like a wart on a witch's nose."

Several businesses also oppose the development, saying it just doesn't fit with Broad Ripple.

"It has to do with density and setbacks." Linda Shikany owns Marigold, there for 16 years, she likes the area's unique qualities. "We welcome development, but let it be within the character and within the plan the city adopted in 1997."

Still, Kosene, which built the popular Monon Row condos to the north, believes the project will only improve the neighborhood. "It's not in character in that it's in fact new and it's ownership versus rental and more dense, but we feel it works well with the older apartments across the trail."

The Metropolitan Development Commission approved the plan 4-3.

http://www.wthr.com/Global/story.asp?S=4442297
I used to live in that area. It's (currently) a craphole. It's hard to believe that the neighborhood would object to higher income homeowners as opposed to renters, especially since Broad Ripple Townhomes and the other apartment communites are just a hop skip and a jump away...
 

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AirTran unveils LA, SF nonstops
Flights mean direct access to West's tech hubs

If you've been California dreamin' through an Indiana winter, wake up.

AirTran Airways announced Tuesday that it is adding daily nonstop flights to Los Angeles and San Francisco from Indianapolis International Airport.

"Nonstop" is the operative word.

Right now, no airline offers a direct flight to San Francisco from Indianapolis. And Northwest Airlines and Southwest Airlines are the only carriers that fly straight to Los Angeles, though Southwest will end that service Feb. 5.

AirTran also is a low-cost carrier, so the fares of its nonstop flights probably will rival fares for flights with a layover or two. A one-way ticket to Los Angeles aboard AirTran will have a base price of $118. A similar ticket for San Francisco will cost $138.

That's good for Indianapolis and good for business travelers, said Mayor Bart Peterson. Inexpensive, nonstop flights to California -- San Francisco, especially -- will open up new avenues of business for the city's tech-laden life sciences sector, he said.

"It's an opportunity to connect us to two of the most important cities in the United States," said Peterson, who attended a news conference at the airport with AirTran officials and Colts' quarterback Peyton Manning. Manning was there for an event for the Make-A-Wish Foundation.

AirTran, based in Orlando, Fla., is known for entering markets and undercutting the fares of larger airlines.

That strategy has been particularly effective in Indianapolis, said Joseph Leonard, chairman and chief executive of AirTran.

"We're pleased with the partnership we have with the city, the airport, and the community has been very supportive," he said.

Within nine months of entering the market, the carrier has gone from two nonstop destinations to eight with Tuesday's announcement.

In addition to Los Angeles and San Francisco, AirTran flies to Atlanta and the Florida cities of Tampa, Orlando, Fort Myers, Fort Lauderdale and Sarasota.

For AirTran, that's quick, Leonard said. Typically, it adds one or two destinations a year to a market, not eight.

"This has been much faster," he said. "It's partly helped by the fact that ATA pulled down so many flights."

Bankrupt ATA Airlines made cuts in Indianapolis for months before ending its flights to and from the city altogether last month. Since May 2005, ATA dropped flights to Las Vegas; New York; Phoenix; St. Petersburg, Fla.; Milwaukee; and Flint, Mich., as well as to Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Leonard said ATA left a lot of demand in Indianapolis.

AirTran is trying to meet it -- first with Los Angeles and San Francisco, and later with nonstop destinations along the East Coast, he said.

"We just go where we think there's a chance of success," Leonard said.

http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2006602010379
 

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Development offers upscale amenities

What: Myron Place, a housing development.
Where: 620 E. 11th St.
Location Between Park Avenue and Broadway Street on the north side of 11th Street.
Developer M.R. Kendall Corp.
Scope of project: 16 connected townhomes, four freestanding homes.
Home prices: Starting at $279,900.
First move-in: Within 45 days.
Features: Homes have nine-foot ceilings, gas fireplaces with decorative surrounds, granite countertops in the kitchen, stainless steel appliances, designer cabinets and kitchen islands. Each home comes with an two-car garages, two bedrooms and 21/2 baths.


Myron PLace Condos located at 11th Street and Broadway.

http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2006601260393
 

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Cultural corridor
Westside area magnet for ethnic retailers

For four years, Jong Sung dreamed of bringing the world to Indianapolis, all wrapped within the four walls of a grocery store.

Today, his two-month-old store Saraga -- which means "life," "love" or "let's go shopping" in his native Korean -- is where people from different nationalities shop, eat and hang flags from their homeland.

Situated directly across from Lafayette Square Mall on Lafayette Road, his grocery, Saraga International, couldn't be in a more fitting spot.

In the last several years, the retail corridor along West 38th Street between Lafayette and High School roads has embraced merchants from all over the world.

Cheaper rents, proximity to Downtown and an increasing number of foreign-born residents have turned the area into a magnet for immigrant and ethnic retailers anxious to test their concepts before moving or expanding to the Northside.

Restaurants and bazaars here sell everything from Ethiopian ye beg tibs and Indian tandoori chicken to Vietnamese pho, Salvadoran pupusa and crocodile-skin boots from Mexico. Store signs are written in Spanish, Vietnamese, Hindi and Arabic.

"There's a growing ethnic population that celebrates diversity," Sung said. "This is the ideal location for us."

Saraga, which occupies a former Kmart, sells merchandise ranging from curry powder to pig's feet and beef tripe. It also has food stations selling Korean, Chinese and Japanese cuisine.

Since it opened, patrons have showed up with flags from their native countries, adding to the existing collection that hangs near the cash registers.

"They come in and ask for their pictures to be taken with us near the flags," Sung said. "It makes us proud."

What works for Sung and other ethnic retailers in the area is demographics.

The grocery is near the city's largest concentration of foreign-born residents. To the northwest, along High School Road, foreign-born residents make up 12.3 percent to 29 percent of the population, according to the 2000 U.S. Census.

The international-flavored businesses are moving into retail space abandoned in recent years by major retailers such as Circuit City and others, providing a business incubator for immigrants from Ethiopia, Peru, Egypt and other countries.

The movement has led to job opportunities for other immigrants and created apartment complexes bearing names such as Las Palmas. Retailers such as India Emporium have landed at Lafayette Square Mall. Even the Georgetown Cinemas 14 nearby started screening Indian Bollywood movies.

The onslaught of merchants has created a competitive environment where only the strongest survive.

Holy Land Halal Meat and Liu's Cuisine, a Malaysian eatery, are a few of the recent casualties.

"It's too packed with options," explained Hooi Tan, of co-owner of Liu's.

But some of the risks have yielded results.

Take the International Bazaar, which began as a 1,000-square-foot store selling nuts and other snacks at a neighboring location and grew into a 15,000-square-foot space. The business, which now rakes in over $1 million in annual sales, includes a grocery store, the vegetarian restaurant Udupi Cafe, Halal Meat Market and International Bazaar Electronics.

The owners also expanded north with Garam Masala Indian Grill near 86th Street and Ditch Road.

"We took a chance with a very small investment," said owner Sudha Calcuttawala.

City and state officials are taking note of some of the successes, designating the Westside area as a community revitalization and enhancement district and offering tax incentives to retailers, while sprucing up and widening the streets there. The investments have begun luring back national retailers.

Wal-Mart recently announced it will build a supercenter at 46th Street and Lafayette Road.

"We feel good about the future of that area," said Gordon Hendry, director of economic development for Mayor Bart Peterson. "We know of some deals in the works that we think will be a nice shot in the arm for that area."

Sung, who co-owns Saraga with his brother Bong, says he is optimistic about the area and the store's future. The Sungs already are working to offer a liquor section and expand the store to carry bulk groceries for restaurants.

And if all goes well, there are bigger plans.

"I always dream big," Jong Sung said with a smile. "Hopefully I will have 20 of these stores in different states."

http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2006601250381
 

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"This is a low density neighborhood and this is a high density condo
Ugh, the NIMBY's in Broad Ripple never cease to amaze me.

"So when you drive down this street, if you'll pardon the expression, it will look like a wart on a witch's nose."
And all the surface lots, sprinkled with bland apartments and a few gas stations don't?
 

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KM1410 said:
The NIMBYs lose again! Did anyone see the renderings of the project on WTHR yesterday? I am perplexed to how anyone could be opposed to the design of the project. The way some people are talking about the project, they make is seem that Kosene is building a 20 story, vinyl clad tower.
[/I]
I did not see the renderings and I looked @ Kosene's website and didn't see the project. Are they building townhomes or a low-rise/mid-rise bldg?
 

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AirTran- maybe they will put a hub in Indy... But isn't ATA on the rebound?

moochie, other than the location of Simon HQ how do you think the design could have been better?
 

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does anyone know if the revitalized/gentrified neighborhoods in downtown are becoming racially diverse (not necessarily balanced)?
 

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Scary Kroger

cwilson758 said:
Well, since Heron-Morton and the Old Northside are both IHPC governed areas, they will have to go through the review process with them and parking will have to be in the rear!
Unfortunately, that Kroger location is technically not part of either historic neighborhood. It's right on the border of both, but because it's north of 16th St, it's not part of the Old Northside and because it's east of Central, it's not part of Herron-Morton.

It's fantastic news if they do anything to that Kroger site, though -- it's such a blight. I used to live at 17th and Central and that Kroger was referred to as "scary Kroger". I could have walked there to get my groceries but more often than not, I drove to O'Malias instead. The Safeway at 22nd and Central was also referred to as the Unsafeway. Apparently it closed recently. Anybody know if there's any development in the works for that site?
 
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