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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think it would be interesting to talk about Indiana's two biggest city's development. Unfortunatly I think Fort Wayne is stagnant. I am obsessed obout Indianapolis even though I am a resident of Fort Wayne. Indianapolis should be proud of what it has done with it's downtown. Indy has gone from naptown to something else entirely... better.
 

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I'd love to hear more about Fort Wayne development. I mean there's got to be something going on in their downtown?
 

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Ft. Wayne has a nearly 600,000 people metro area. That is nothing to "shake a stick at."
 

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Ive been to Indianapolis several times.

It has excellent health care, I heard that Indianapolis is in the top 10 for good hospitals and I believe it, they seem to have alot of them. And the purchasing power of its residents is very high, Ive seen in the BEA wages are very good in Indianapolis and the cost of living is dirt cheap.

However, Indianapolis has a very clean downtown, but also a very, very boring downtown also. I am sure the planners do a try very hard, but Indianapolis just has a very conservative demographic. I mean serious its like Indianapolis has no singles under the age of 21.

From the looks of it Indianapolis is a married by 20, 2 kids by the age of 25 middle-class kind of city.
 

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Distribution is becoming a big Indiana industry, as it should being within a day's drive of most of the country's population. This is an excerpt from an Indiana Business magazine article from 2004.

Around the state.

The distribution boom isn’t limited to central Indiana. Indeed, the location advantages are equally strong in other parts of the state, observes Patrick McMahon, executive director of Project Future in South Bend.

McMahon’s area offers a prime example: Get a map and draw a circle indicating the distance a truck can reach within a day, then determine how many people fall within that delivery radius. Measured this way, the top spot in the country is Harrisburg, Penn., according to McMahon. But the No. 2 place, he claims, is South Bend.

"We’ve had a number of major facilities developed in recent years," McMahon says. They include another distribution center serving TJX, specifically the company’s up-and-coming discount retail chain known as A.J. Wright. McMahon says the facility started with half a million square feet, then chose to add another 300,000.

Others include Tech Data, which distributes information-technology products from South Bend; Patterson Dental Supply, which serves a dozen and a half states from its South Bend-area distribution center; SBC, which ships telecom parts to a multistate area from a northern Indiana hub; and local tire supplier Tire Rack, which ships wheels to half the country from the South Bend area, according to McMahon.

The northeast corner of the state benefits from the presence of Interstate 69, which heads north into auto country and on toward Canada, as well as the Indiana Toll Road, linked to Chicago and the coasts. Distribution centers continue to sprout around the region, including a Benco Dental facility in Fort Wayne and a giant Performance Food Group center in Kendallville.

Northwest Indiana boasts proximity to Chicago and transportation assets that include not only strong road and rail links but a major Lake Michigan port for ocean-faring vessels. Nearby is AmeriPlex at the Port, a 400-acre business park developed by South Bend-based Holladay Properties. John Phair, Holladay’s president, says there’s a wide range of logistics activity there, including a facility serving pharmaceutical manufacturer Aventis, a parts distribution facility serving DaimlerChrysler and a Walgreen’s returns-processing center.

From Holladay’s perspective, the road connections are the most important when it comes to logistics. Though the port is nearby, water access hasn’t been essential for the logistics operations currently at AmeriPlex at the Port. "I wouldn’t call it a major factor at this stage for this product type."

But water does sometimes come into play when it comes to Evansville-area logistics operations, according to Ken Robinson, executive director of the economic-development group known as Vision-e. He says goods can be loaded or unloaded at the Southwind Maritime Centre in nearby Mount Vernon. He adds that containers also can be transferred between rail and truck at the area’s rail yards.

While Evansville is still awaiting its Interstate 69 connections that ultimately will provide a direct route to both Canada and Mexico, the area already benefits from decent highway links. The city is well-suited via Interstate 64 to serve Midwestern customers in such cities as St. Louis, Louisville, Cincinnati and Nashville, and a number of distribution centers do just that.

Ford, for example, has a 370,000-square-foot parts-distribution center along Interstate 64, Robinson says. TJX operates in Evansville as well, with a million-square-foot facility. Locally based Shoe Carnival serves its stores from an Evansville distribution center, Robinson adds.

Augmenting the area’s infrastructure strengths is one more fact that is attractive to many in the logistics business, Robinson says. "Evansville is near the population center of the country."

http://www.indianabusiness.com/articles/2004/0904_C.html
 

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A Hot Market?
South Bend builds on its diverse economy.

by Heidi Prescott Wieneke

A year ago, South Bend was ranked one of the Top 40 hottest real-estate markets for business. Other cities on the list from Expansion Management magazine included Indianapolis, Cleveland, Milwaukee, Houston and Denver. South Bend made the list for the first time based on available land, office and industrial space inventory, along with redevelopment opportunities for new and expanding companies.

The city of South Bend is redeveloping the old Studebaker Brothers Manufacturing Co. and Oliver Chilled Plow Works industrial corridors for warehousing and distribution, with hopes to recruit light-industrial companies south of downtown. Blackthorn Corporate Park is expanding with new research-and-development firms. The downtown office market is witnessing resurgence, and the south side is seeing new investment from retailers and restaurants.

"We’re large enough to have the resources to support business and provide a great quality of life, but small enough to be friendly," says South Bend Mayor Stephen J. Luecke. "As we look to the future, we want to build on our existing strengths and help our existing businesses thrive. We’ve learned a diverse economy is good for us."

Location is one of South Bend’s biggest assets and the main reason the city has become a hub for manufacturing and distribution.

Whether it's research and development at Bosch Braking Systems and Underwriters Laboratories, services provided by Crowe Chizek and Co. and Press Ganey Associates, or distribution and warehousing operations at AJ Wright and Tire Rack, location is critical to South Bend's business base.

The city is enjoying retail development as well. The old Scottsdale Mall property was recently demolished to make way for Erskine Village, a 510,000-square-foot, $35 million retail center. It will feature a large strip mall and a number of multi-tenant buildings and freestanding restaurants.

Diversity has helped the local economy weather tough times.

"We have a little bit of everything," says Sharon Kendall, director of South Bend's department of economic and community development. "We are the regional center for the banking, legal and service entities, and with our universities, we have a leg up on other communities."

By partnering with businesses in R&D projects, providing strong job-market candidates and employing about 4,800 people, the University of Notre Dame plays a critical role in maintaining and strengthening the diversity of the economy.

"We’re here because the universities are phenomenal resources," says Mel Hall, president and CEO at Press Ganey Associates. Press Ganey is a leading patient-satisfaction measurement company founded in South Bend in 1985 by two Notre Dame alums and professors. Press Ganey is a South Bend success story, having grown from 40 to 425 employees and 90,000 square feet in five buildings.

"We have considered leaving. We need to continue to expand, and there’s not a lot of office space in downtown South Bend. But we wanted to stay here, and the city stepped up and helped us find some buildings and incentivised us to stay," Hall says.

"What causes growth here? The educational institutions and the fact that people can find meaningful work here," he says. "It’s a great place to work. There’s a very strong work ethic in this area. People want to make a difference."

One of the city’s biggest growth stories is Memorial Hospital & Health System, which has made about $300 million in capital investments to its downtown medical campus since the mid-1990s. The centralized location, medical research being completed at Notre Dame, along with the entrepreneurial spirit that has spawned such medical-related business startups as Press Ganey and Environmental Health Laboratories, now Underwriters Laboratories, have indirectly contributed to Memorial’s success.

"The link and tie to Notre Dame’s clinical and biotechnological research is critical in developing new jobs for the future, as is developing a technology park and incubators that would enable companies to get started," says Phil Newbold, Memorial’s president and chief executive officer.

Memorial has the second-largest newborn intensive care unit in the state, second to Riley Hospital in Indianapolis; the hospital recently became the second in Indiana to earn verification as a Level II trauma center; and during the next few years it will open its new heart and vascular center and construct a children’s hospital within the hospital.

A challenge for South Bend is solving the north-south transportation link on U.S. 31 to Indianapolis, officials agree. More people might stay in-state for health care with a better highway, rather than drive to Chicago or Ann Arbor.

"South Bend is a wonderful place for health care," Newbold says. "This is a great place to raise a family, the schools are good, the cost of housing is phenomenally low and you can get around in 20 minutes to just about anywhere. It’s a great community to live in, without the problems bigger cities have."

http://www.indianabusiness.com/articles/2005/0105_J.html

LOL oh wait, you wanted Fort Wayne didn't you? All of this, along with the distribution (AJ Wright), plus a developer wants to develop the Lasalle building downtown and put a Hilton Hotel there (lol a hilton garden inn, so what?)...and South Bend is looking pretty damn good these days.

Northwest Indiana (esp. Porter Co) will continue to grow quickly, almost as fast as some suburban Indianapolis counties.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
DMRyan said:
I'd love to hear more about Fort Wayne development. I mean there's got to be something going on in their downtown?
The only thing happening downtown is the overhaul of the Grand Wayne Center. Other than that i don't know anything else. Does anyone else think the architectural style of Fort Wayne's skyscrapers is a pain to look at? I sure do. We do have some nice churces and the Embassy theatre that add an aesthetic appeal. If you visit http://www.skyscraperpage.com youll see our sad collection of talls.
 

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April 22, 2005 07:00 AM US Eastern Timezone

Adecco's 'Where-the-Jobs-Are' Report Shows Increased Hiring in Central Indiana

INDIANAPOLIS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--April 22, 2005--In advance of the Indiana state unemployment report, Adecco (NYSE:ADO), the staffing industry's market leader in the U.S. and the world, today announced it is seeing increased demand for employees in central Indiana, especially in the manufacturing and distribution industries. Central Indiana is one of many locales across the country where Adecco is responding to a growing need for contingent workers from employers in a variety of industries.

Becky Kirchner, an Adecco area vice president in central Indiana, says, "Counter to Bureau of Labor Statistics numbers showing that manufacturing jobs are down, we are placing more and more candidates in the manufacturing sector. New product launches are spurring an increase in hiring."

Job seekers should take note that in addition to traditional temporary hiring, Adecco branches are receiving more requests for temp-to-hire and direct hire candidates. People who take on temp-to-hire positions can potentially parlay their temporary assignment into a full-time position. People to fill temporary and temp-to-hire positions in logistics, call centers, machine operations and customer care are all in high demand from companies in the central Indiana area.

As Kirchner says, "Right now, entry-level jobs are abundant, yet qualified candidates for entry-level positions are a challenge to find. As a result, candidates with any previous experience and a good attendance record are of great interest to area employers."

Adecco releases its "Where the Jobs Are" report in advance of the state unemployment reports to provide more depth and breadth to the employment picture in selected regions. The report is based on interviews with Adecco recruiters across the country and consists of press releases that report on hiring trends in regions experiencing employment growth. The trends in these regions are not intended to be indicators of nationwide trends.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Here are some Indianapolis/Fort Wayne statistics on jobs.

Fort Wayne:
Unemployment Rate-5.3%
Recent Job Growth- 2.5%
White Collar- 51.7%
Blue Collar- 48.3%
Largest Employing Industry- Transporatation Equipment Manufacturing

Indianapolis
Unemployment Rate- 4.8%
Recent Job Growth- .0% (Future Job Growth is expected to increase 15.6%)
White Collar- 59.0%
Blue Collar- 41.0%
Largest Employing Industry- Transportation Equipment Manufacturing
 

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Fort Wayne

If any of you who are familiar with Fort Wayne, their is an empty property just north of the river downtown. Whatever is going to be built needs to be the one thing that kick starts a new age in Fort Wayne development. Fort Wayne is growing size wise in population and recent job growth. Now its time for downtown to catch up.
 
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