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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey people, since we rarely get to see photos of great hoods in Indy, here are a few of Mass ave, and Lockerbie, and a few looking in to chatham arch.
I found this photos in archives of urbanplanet, but I thought I would bring them over here incase noone has seen them before, and also to give people a taste of Indys neighborhoods.
Lockerbie square-
dating from 1847- Lockerbie square is the oldest surviving neighborhood in Indianapolis. One of the nations premiere victorian restorations, lockerbie square neighborhood is just seven blocks from the very heart of the city, and stands today as a national example of urban renewal and historic preservation. An eclectic mix of italianate, federal, and queen anne houses standing side by side among quaint cottages- in the shadow of downtown Indianapolis. Lockerbie square was platted in 1847 by Janet McQuat and named after her beloved father, George Lockerbie, who had come to America from Scotland.

Mass ave-
Mass Ave evolves through history
A few blocks northeast of Monument Circle, Massachusetts Avenue was designed in 1821 as one of Downtown’s four original diagonal streets. It began as a commercial area mainly for the surrounding neighborhood.

With the development of streetcar lines, more people took advantage of Mass Ave’s service-oriented businesses. Positioned along several streetcar and interurban routes, it was a continuously growing and happening place between 1870 and 1930.

German influence
Bernard Vonnegut, grandfather of Hoosier author Kurt Vonnegut, and Arthur Bohn designed the Athenaeum in 1893 as a place for members of local German societies to gather. Both were American-born sons of German immigrants, a culture that had a strong influence in the area around this time.
Musical Interludes
Oscar D. Bohlen designed the Murat Shrine in 1909, modeling it after an Islamic mosque. By 1984, the Murat had the largest membership of any Shrine temple in the world.

Theater was first brought to the Murat in 1910, starting a strong theatrical tradition. The facility officially became the Murat Centre in 1996 after receiving an $11 million renovation. This helped bring visitors to Mass Ave by showcasing great performances, including Broadway shows, popular music acts and more.

New shops, restaurants and other businesses made their home on Mass Ave, furthering the area’s growth. O'Malia's Food Market, Downtown’s only grocery store, opened in the old Sears Roebuck & Co. building. Organizations such as Riley Area Development Corp., formed in 1979, assist in the development of Mass Ave. Mass Ave now holds the status of the city’s foremost arts and theater district. Residents, shopkeepers, artists, restaurateurs and many others continue believing in it, helping Mass Ave grow and flourish.

Chatham arch-
The Chatham Arch Historic District exhibits both historical and architectural significance. Its irregular street pattern, most of it dating before the Civil War, recalls life in Indianapolis when the city was just beginning to expand beyond the original Mile Square plat. The area also boasts a group of Civil War era workers' cottages on Arch, St. Clair, and 9th Streets. These houses represent the working person's presence in the early stages of Indianapolis' growth into an industrial metropolis. Only a few pockets of these 1860's and early 1870's cottages survive in the downtown.

The northern portion of Chatham Arch illustrates an unusual mixture of housing types. Here, workers' cottages, middle class residences, rental duplexes, apartment buildings and flats, commercial buildings with second floor sleeping rooms, and a few large homes of the wealthy all existed at the turn of the century. Massachusetts Avenue is the primary commercial district in Chatham Arch, and it exhibits several fine post-Civil War and early twentieth century commercial buildings, which recall the close relationship between the neighborhood merchants on the Avenue and the neighborhoods to the north and south. The Real Silk Hosiery Mills complex, formerly home of one of the country's main silk hosiery factories, is evidence of the neighborhood's industrial significance along College Avenue.

The Chatham Arch area also contains the historical roots of several major religious denominations of the city. One of the oldest black congregations in Indianapolis, Allen Chapel AME Church, has occupied a location in the area for over 116 years. The former First United Brethren Church was represented by two different church buildings on Park Avenue. One of the largest German Reformed congregations of the city built Zion Evangelical Church at the west edge of Chatham Arch. The Roman Catholic Church was represented from 1880-1949 on the southern edge of the area by St. Joseph's Parish.




























 

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I park at the Antheneum therefore I get to see this awesome neighborhood everyday. Plus I get to keep tabs on the new Cultural Trail that's going in.
 

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JUNCTA JUVANT
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Coldayman? ... Coldayman?


I'm sincerely interested in seeing neighborhood shots, street scenes, you know. Like entire blocks. I go to Indy every now and then, but I must admit I am mainly in the downtown area and vicinity (all 6.5 sq. mi. of it).
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
This isn't Indianapolis' oldest neighborhood.

its considered the oldest surviving ones.
These photos were infact taken around that time, any other time of the week, it would have been more lively.
 

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Those are the Lockerbie Townhomes. They are in Lockerbie Square. I personally think they are one of the higher quality developments downtown.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
but I guess since we have no urban neighborhoods,
this must all be in some other city, or burned to the ground yesterday. =/
 

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President of Catan
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^^
I agree, that is a great development, but I can't help but wonder: If that wasn't a family walking there, if it was thugs making a drug deal, that development would likely look a lot less attractive.. hah I just got to thinking because that little family looks so happy and content that you can't help but think "Oh, what a great area."
Hell, it makes me want to live there. :lol:
 
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