SkyscraperCity banner

41 - 60 of 104 Posts

·
hazaron ke anna
Joined
·
8,523 Posts
150 elephants in captivity in Karnataka

Bangalore: A study of captive elephants shows that a large number are maltreated in bondage across the state. More than 140 Asiatic
elephants, which come under Schedule 1 of the Wildlife Protection Act, are in captivity in Karnataka.

More than 50 elephants are forced to walk from Kerala to Karnataka every couple of months to haul timber. Many are old, ill and unkempt. On December 23, a captive elephant was stung by bees at a private farm in Mudigere Post, Chikmagalur, while hauling material. The business of captive elephants is flourishing in both states. The recent report, `Welfare and Management of Elephants in Karnatka in Captivity', studies their current state and what led to it.

....
Source: The Times of India on 1 Jan 2008

 

·
hazaron ke anna
Joined
·
8,523 Posts
The ugly toad has its many uses

....

The world of mammals would be the first to go. From the beginning of the 19th century, hundreds of large birds and mammals apart from reptiles and amphibians have gone extinct and a further 1500 are threatened and need protection.

....



Amphibians, and this scientists repeat, are not only the best bio-indicators of environmental pollution and climate change, but as predators they also play a large role in maintaining biological stability. The most important reason for the extinction of amphibians is the drying up of water bodies and the pollution of the countryside. Another reason which has caused the disappearance of the amphibians in the US and Australia is because of epidemics.

....
Source: Deccan Herald
 

·
hazaron ke anna
Joined
·
8,523 Posts
Scientists hope to resurrect extinct Indian Cheetah

New Delhi (PTI): The Indian Cheetah, which has gone extinct, may be resurrected if cell lines from their cousins in Iran could be procured, scientists say.

A group of Indian scientists at Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Hyderabad, is working on the ambitious project of gathering and storing genetic material of the wildlife species in a DNA bank which later may be used to resurrect the extinct species like Indian Cheetah and increasing the population of endangered species.

The Asiatic Cheetah, a variant of Indian Cheetah, is found in some pockets outside India, including in Iran.

"If a cell line made from the Cheetah was available, it would have been possible to resurrect the species. It seems there are at present a few Cheetahs in Iran. If tissue or cell samples could be procured from Iran it should be possible to clone the Cheetah using Leopard as a surrogate mother," S. Shivaji, a scientist at CCMB, told PTI.

....
Source: The Hindu on 13 Jan 2009



Courtesy: gazelle
 

·
hazaron ke anna
Joined
·
8,523 Posts
Tragedy strikes union in the wild - Siloni, India’s first gibbon released in forest, dies young

Jan. 13: Siloni found freedom and love in the wild but lost her life at the dawn of her youth.



India’s first gibbon released into the wild died on Monday in Assam’s Panbari reserve forest near Kaziranga in a setback to conservation efforts aimed at pairing primates rendered mateless by forest destruction.

....
Source: The Telegraph on 14th Jan 2009
 

·
hazaron ke anna
Joined
·
8,523 Posts
Karnatak wildlife updates

Jackals are disappearing from Nilgiri forests

New Delhi (IANS): Jackals, a protected species, are fast disappearing from Karnataka's southwestern Kodagu region in the Nilgiris. Alarmed conservationists are now starting a study to find out what is going wrong with nature's scavengers.

....

The NGO Wildlife Trust of India (WTI) has initiated a study in the area, covering the Nagarhole National Park and the Brahmagiri Wildlife Sanctuary, to find out why jackals are disappearing.

Of the three similar species worldwide, the Golden jackal or Canis aureus is found in India. The other two are side-striped jackal and black-backed jackal.

....
Source: The Hindu on 25 Jan 2009


Source: Flickr


Tigers shining in Karnataka

BANGALORE: The dwindling population of tigers in the country is a major concern. But Karnataka gives reason to smile: a recent study reveals that
the state's tiger population is stable.

The study, 'Distribution and dynamics of tiger and prey populations in Karnataka' by the Wildlife Conservation Society and Centre for Wildlife Studies, was done covering a 22,000 square km landscape - Malenad-Mysore Tiger Landscape (MMTL).

A tiger abundance index was derived which shows there are about 200 adult/juvenile tigers in the MMTL region. Intensive monitoring in three prime tiger habitats - Nagarahole National Park, Bandipur National Park and Bhadra Tiger Reserve - indicate that tiger populations in Nagarahole and Bandipur are relatively high and stable with tiger densities ranging between 11 and 15 adults per 100 square km.

....
Source: The Times of India on 22 Jan 2009
 

·
hazaron ke anna
Joined
·
8,523 Posts
Indian pythons slithering into oblivion

Jaipur: The Keoladeo Ghana National Park, popularly known as Bharatpur is India's best known bird sanctuary. This 28.7-square-kilometre mixed wetland, woodland, grass and scrub is home to 400 plus species of birds.

It was known as the best duck shooting resort in the British Empire. First-time visitors are usually overwhelmed by the sheer number of waterfowl and waders which congregate to the shallow marshy lakes of Bharatpur, but few know that this national park also houses 13 species of snakes, including the Indian Python.



A good place to find the Indian Rock Python in Keoladeo, situated in India's northwestern state of Rajasthan, is the area around Python Point. They live underground in hollows often shared with porcupines and can be found sunning themselves at midday or curled up beneath a bush.

Nature lovers don't mind investing in the services of guides to find the pythons. But soon even the guides would not be of much help. The number of Indian Pythons, also known as black-tailed python, in the national park has declined almost 50 per cent in less than a decade.

....
Source: gulfnews.com
 

·
hazaron ke anna
Joined
·
8,523 Posts
Rusty-spotted cat sighted in Indroda park

AHMEDABAD: In what could be considered as a rare sighting for Indroda Park, Gujarat Ecology and Education Research (GEER) team spotted the Rusty-spotted Cat on Wednesday night which is one of the smallest species of cat in the world.

It is called Rusty-spotted Cat as its greyish fur is marked with reddish spots and is also marked with brown elongated lines. The belly and insides of limbs are white with large dark spots. It is between 35-48 cm tall, its tail is about 15-25 cm and weighs around 1.5 kg. It is similar in appearance to the Leopard Cat.

....
Source: The Times of India

Read post#40 for earlier spotting of rusty-spotted cat in Karnataka.
 

·
hazaron ke anna
Joined
·
8,523 Posts
India launches project to save endangered snow leopards

New Delhi (IANS): India on Tuesday launched Project Snow Leopard to conserve the endangered species (Uncia uncia) across its habitat in the five Himalayan states in the country.

....

The project will be undertaken in five Himalayan states of Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Sikkim, and Arunachal Pradesh with support from the Wildlife Institute of India (WII) and the Mysore based Nature Conservation Foundation (NCF).

While releasing the project document, Regupathy said snow leopard is globally endangered specie and an important flagship species of the mountain region.

They are at the apex of ecological pyramid and suffer the most on account of relatively smaller population size and also due to man-animal conflict. This situation gets further aggravated due to the hostile landscape forming its habitat.

The minister said snow leopard has been included in the list of species under the Recovery Programme to be funded through the umbrella scheme of integrated development of wildlife habitats.

Giving details of the snow leopard habitat, Regupathy said there are more than 26 protected areas in the Himalayan landscape where specie is reported. However, areas outside the protected areas are equally important for long-range species like snow leopard.

....
Source: The Hindu 21 Jan 2009



Photo: TRAVELLEISURE
 

·
hazaron ke anna
Joined
·
8,523 Posts
Record number of migratory birds flock to Kashmir

Srinagar: A record 900,000 migratory birds from Siberia, China and Central Asia besides Indian sub-continent, are presently nestling in Kashmir valley.

....

Mohd Maqbool Baba, Wildlife Warden at Hokersar Wetland said that the record arrivals could be possibly due to the efforts made by his department to maintain optimum water level in the wetlands and warmer weather compared to previous winter.

"This time we have approximately 900,000 migratory birds in our various wetlands, Hokur has around 200,000 to 300,000 migratory birds, Shallabugh has around 100,000 to 200,000 migratory birds and the highest concentration of migratorybirds is in Haigam wetlands which has around 400,000 to 500,000. The main reason for the record number of birds this time is that we have maintained optimum water level in these wetlands," he added.

....
Source: MSN News
 

·
hazaron ke anna
Joined
·
8,523 Posts
Western Ghats all set to enter UN’s heritage sites list

KOCHI: It appears that the UNESCO would come to the rescue of the Western Ghats when it will be declared a world natural heritage site. It means that the ghats, known for its rich bio-diversity and evergreen tropical forests, could become a protected zone after becoming a UNESCO natural heritage site in 2010.

“We have submitted a series of reports on the Western Ghats and the Eastern Himalayas and identified several natural sites in the states the fall under the ghats. Following our report to the Ministry of Environment and Forests, the UN body asked the government to submit the details of different natural sites under the Western Ghats, which was forwarded to the respective state governments”, said Jagdish Krishnaswamy, project coordinator, the Ashok Trust for Research for Ecology and Environment(ATREE), which carried out the site-studies for Kerala and Karnataka.

The World Wildlife Institute of India, Dehradun, has submitted the nomination dossier of 39 natural sites from states, including Karnataka, Kerala and Maharashtra, that come under the single cluster of the Western Ghats.

The final report will be submitted to the UNESCO on the basis of all the dossiers from the different states. A UNESCO team will visit India next year to give its seal of approval in this regard.

There are six natural heritage sites in India which include the Valley of Flowers, the Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve, the Kaziranga National Park, the Manas Wildlife Sanctuary, the Sunderban and the Keoladeo National Park.

“There is strong competition among countries to get into the UNESCO heritage sites list”, Jagdish said. According to the guidelines set by the World Heritage Convention, of which India is a signatory, each country has to prepare a tentative list of sites that it proposes to nominate as world heritage sites.
Source: express buzz
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
618 Posts
grt news.. but does this mean that the states will be serious about protecting the ecology in those sites or will "under the table" approvals keep going on.
 

·
hazaron ke anna
Joined
·
8,523 Posts
Fire Destroys Large Forest Cover in Rajouri

Manjakote | June 25- A massive fire has engulfed a large forest area in the state, destroying trees and posing threat to nomadic tribes living near the forest.

The fire, which has been raging for past two days in Rajouri areas, has caused damage to the region's ecology.

The forest authorities have sought the help of in Army personnel to douse the fire, which they cite is due to a prolonged dry spell and high temperature in the region.

"The temperature is very high especially in Jammu region and in Kanjuri, Kalakot and Pandi ranges there have been many incidents of fire. We have deployed all our staff in controlling these fires," said Gulzar Hussain, District Forest Officer (DFO), Rajouri.

The fire officials are trying their level best to control the fire and stop it from spreading further, but have not been successful.

Scarcity of water is a major handicap in controlling the fire. The fire has also led to a rise in the temperature of the region around the forest cover.
Forest fires are a major cause of degradation of forest cover in India and around 90 percent of the fires are caused due to human carelessness.
Source: Kashmir Observer

Check also NDTV video.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,637 Posts
grt news.. but does this mean that the states will be serious about protecting the ecology in those sites or will "under the table" approvals keep going on.
I feel your pain man. A couple of years ago we were trekking in the western ghats, the area was supposed to be a reserved forest, but after walking for some time the trees disappeared and we saw a large number of excavators quarrying the hills.
 

·
hazaron ke anna
Joined
·
8,523 Posts
Greens wilt over indifferent budget 2009-2010

Wildlife conservationist Kishor Rithe termed the budget 'disappointing.' "We have a tough task to protect forested watersheds that actually give water and energy. This can be only achieved by allocating more funds but this has not been done. We were also expecting allocation for implementing the National Wildlife Action Plan 2002-16 for tiger & wildlife conservation in more than 600 sanctuaries and national parks. More funds were expected for the resettlement of 1500-odd villages from tiger reserves," he remarked.

The announcement about eight national missions on climate change is also not clear. The increase in allocation for national river and lake conservation plan from Rs 335 crore in 2008-09 to Rs 562 crore is the only positive thing. The allocation of special one-time grant of Rs 100 crore for Indian Council of Forestry Research and Education (ICFRE), Dehradun, is meagre considering the size of ICFRE. Rithe said the allocation cannot change the state of affairs of 600-odd protected areas and around 40-odd tiger reserves, which are real gene banks and watersheds of major rivers.

Climate change expert Nishikant Kale of Nature Conservation Society said India had agreed that climate change was an extraordinary challenge and deserved an extraordinary response. However, poor allocations and lack of strategy would not help curb it.

Conservationist Prafulla Bhamburkar of Wildlife Trust of India said that last year, then FM P Chidambaram had announced a one-time grant of Rs 50 crore for tiger protection. He said exclusive funds were needed for relocation of villages inside the tiger reserves for creating inviolate spaces.
Source: TOI
 

·
hazaron ke anna
Joined
·
8,523 Posts
Forest ponds in Himachal to harvest rainwater

Shimla: Forest ponds will be constructed to check the depleting groundwater and to harvest rainwater in Himachal Pradesh, state Forest Minister J.P. Nadda said Sunday.

He said the 'van sarovars' or forest ponds will be constructed under the NREGA (National Rural Employment Guarantee Act) programme. "These would help check depleting water levels by recharging aquifers and even provide water to the wildlife during peak summer," Nadda told IANS.

"Initially, five such ponds would be constructed in each of the 38 forest divisions. Falling water level is a cause of concern. Even during monsoon, most of the rainwater goes down the drain due to lack of rainwater harvesting structures."

"Large-scale conversion of green patches into concrete jungle has already affected recharging of aquifers. For this, forest ponds would provide water for the plantations that would be taken up from time to time."

For constructing the ponds, Nadda said the labourers would be employed under the central government's flagship NREGA programme.

Himachal Pradesh has 33 wildlife sanctuaries and two national parks. According to official records, 66 percent - 37,033 sq km of the total 55,643 sq km - of the Himalayan state is under forest cover.

The lush green valleys and snow capped mountains of the state are home to 36 percent of the country's species of birds. Of the 1,228 species that have been reported in India, 447 are in this state alone.

Similarly, 77 species of mammals - from the spectacular snow leopard to the common Himalayan tahr, a type of wild goat - have been recorded by the Himachal State Council for Science, Technology and Environment in its biodiversity report.

The storehouse of biodiversity also supports 3,120 species of flowering plants, including 187 species of medicinal plants.
Source: samaylive
 

·
hazaron ke anna
Joined
·
8,523 Posts
New methods to recharge aquifers!

The Moodbidri range has over 4000 hectares of reserve forests which shares its boundaries with the Kudremukh National park on the Eastern side. Popularly called as the Mooji Malai range, the forests were sparse and were under the threat of denudation due to widespread poaching and felling. But gritty officers like Manjunath Shetty and his RFO Sridhar have turned the range into out of bounds for poachers and fellers. Three years back they had set themselves on this task but now they are completely in control.

Once that happened the forests working on a plan to rejuvenate the water bodies came across many dry patches in the range which needed to be revived into perennial water sources, which they were once. These small rivulets and brooks later join the Kumaradhara and Nethravati to make the source of water for the city of Mangalore.

Due to the top soil erosion and denudation of forests, the water veins had been out of flow-- they flowed only during the rainy season. But Mr. Shetty and Sridhar had one plan in mind. They had to create several hundred mini watershed areas all along the brooks and rivulets and this could be achieved by diligently following a pattern. They had a pattern ready and the device they zeroed in on was called 'Gully Checks'. There is nothing complicated in this device says Mr. Shetty. "It is a series of boulders kept in harmony with each other to check the flow of water, the idea was to hold the water for longer period in every such bunds."

After two years of hard work the forest department team in the Moodbidri range has erected some 400 gully checks which holds enormous volume of water in about 50 small and big rivulets in the Mooji Malai range.

Following the device working in so many locations the water table of the Mooji Malai range has now reached the level it used to be some 50 years back says Mr. Shetty with a satisfied smile.

Sridhar expects the water to be there till the end of summer. "These devices are meant for holding the water for longer period, it overflows during the rainy season and collects in the deep gorges of the gully checks during the lean period, this mechanism will ensure the recharging of the underground water veins that feeds so many aquifer systems all along the course and at least 10 kilometers around."

This model is now being replicated in many other reserve forests in the state including Bandipur and Nagarahole National Parks. The Kundapur range has also picked up the plan and is now working on same lines.
Source: Mangalorean
 

·
hazaron ke anna
Joined
·
8,523 Posts
India's forestry plan in spotlight ahead of climate talks



NEW DELHI: India has turned to its vast forest cover to absorb its growing greenhouse gas emissions and stem international pressure to sign on to binding carbon reduction targets.
Under a plan unveiled by Environment Minister Jairam Ramesh earlier this month, Indian authorities have decided to focus on increasing the density of woodlands through silviculture, the controlled growth and management of trees.

Just under two percent of Indian forests are high-density, meaning they have the best potential for capturing carbon emissions, while ten percent falls under the medium density category, according to the government.
Source: DAWN
 

·
hazaron ke anna
Joined
·
8,523 Posts
Sighting of Jerdon’s Courser sparks hope



The sighting of the critically endangered Jerdon’s Courser, a ground bird found in scrub jungles, after many years has come as "major boost" to the conservation efforts of wildlife activists and environmentalists, to save the species.

Two Jerdon’s Coursers were spotted by BNHS scientist Rahul Chavan and his local assistant Rahim in the core area of Sri Lankamalleswara Wildlife Sanctuary in Cuddapah district of Andhra Pradesh on the morning of August 6, 2009.
Read more on The Hindu.
 
41 - 60 of 104 Posts
Top