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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello all, this can be my introduction thread. I am from the Baltimore area but unlike most of the flashy new and clean content posted here I can generally be found admiring all the dark and dirty parts of the city. I am into photography, architecture, building re-use, laser scanning, 3d modeling.... Experienced in civil, structural and architectural design, planning and engineering.

Wanted to post some photos from some of my favorite spots around the city (mainly Baltimore)... Enjoy

Asylum - Baltimore


Brewery - Baltimore




Power Plant - Baltimore




Dead Ferry - Baltimore


Mystery Tunnell - Baltimore


Theatre in pain - Baltimore


Hospital - Baltimore


Hospital - DC


Another Theatre in Pain - DC


Mystery Church


Another


Brewery - Baltimore


Brewery (boh)- Baltimore


If you like what you see you can get more on my site www.urbanatrophy.com
 

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Great introductory thread, indeed, Dan. I would be grateful if you could give some history to some of the sites in these pictures. I'm particularly interested in the "Mystery Tunnel" and the "Mystery Church."
 

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Asylum - Baltimore
Great stuff. The following excerpt (particularly the second para) from the Maryland Historical Society's Web site sheds some light on the image of the former Hebrew Orphan Asylum (which is located on the NW corner of Ashburton and Rayner in W. Balto):

"Baltimoreans past and present have endowed their “Monumental City” with a priceless “built heritage,” but each generation diminishes its patrimony of buildings and monuments as readily - sometimes even more readily - than it adds to its list of bequests. The documentation of this process of simultaneous addition and subtraction in Baltimore always has been part of the mission of the Maryland Historical Society, and it has been made easier by the advent of new technologies like the one on which you are reading this.

"A computer allows an image of, say, the 19th century country seat called “Calverton” to be linked for a researcher to an image of the Baltimore County Almshouse, and for both of them to be tied to images of the Hebrew Orphan Asylum, the West Baltimore General Hospital, and the Lutheran Hospital in a way which highlights the fact that each of these successively occupied the same site in west Baltimore. At the same time, it allows the Maryland Historical Society’s library staff and volunteers—the creators of this Web site—to more thoroughly tap the Society’s past so as to comprehensively document not only structures we all know and love, but others which have been forgotten for decades or even centuries. The computer can cheaply bind the warp of written words to the woof of images so as to create—in many cases for the first time—a tapestry of fact on an age which is passing away for an age which could not need it more."

- Francis O'Neill, Senior Reference Librarian, MdHS Library
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Great stuff. The following excerpt (particularly the second para) from the Maryland Historical Society's Web site sheds some light on the image of the former Hebrew Orphan Asylum (which is located on the NW corner of Ashburton and Rayner in W. Balto):

"Baltimoreans past and present have endowed their “Monumental City” with a priceless “built heritage,” but each generation diminishes its patrimony of buildings and monuments as readily - sometimes even more readily - than it adds to its list of bequests. The documentation of this process of simultaneous addition and subtraction in Baltimore always has been part of the mission of the Maryland Historical Society, and it has been made easier by the advent of new technologies like the one on which you are reading this.

"A computer allows an image of, say, the 19th century country seat called “Calverton” to be linked for a researcher to an image of the Baltimore County Almshouse, and for both of them to be tied to images of the Hebrew Orphan Asylum, the West Baltimore General Hospital, and the Lutheran Hospital in a way which highlights the fact that each of these successively occupied the same site in west Baltimore. At the same time, it allows the Maryland Historical Society’s library staff and volunteers—the creators of this Web site—to more thoroughly tap the Society’s past so as to comprehensively document not only structures we all know and love, but others which have been forgotten for decades or even centuries. The computer can cheaply bind the warp of written words to the woof of images so as to create—in many cases for the first time—a tapestry of fact on an age which is passing away for an age which could not need it more."

- Francis O'Neill, Senior Reference Librarian, MdHS Library
The Lutheran Hospital directly beside the Hebrew Orphan Asylum is currently being demolished but I believe the Asylum stays.

Here is Lutheran:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
good shots, dan! i'm trying to remember if pat turner said he was going to get rid of that power plant when he finally starts the westport project. hmmmm, not sure.......
Demo and abatement have already started. The loss of Westport will leave 2 large size vacant power plants in Bmore.
 

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I think one of the marks of a truly superb urban photographer is the ability to make the most decrepid, dangerous looking structures look majestic. You did that. Good work.
 

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Hello all, this can be my introduction thread. I am from the Baltimore area but unlike most of the flashy new and clean content posted here I can generally be found admiring all the dark and dirty parts of the city. I am into photography, architecture, building re-use, laser scanning, 3d modeling.... Experienced in civil, structural and architectural design, planning and engineering.

Wanted to post some photos from some of my favorite spots around the city (mainly Baltimore)... Enjoy
Very cool! I have been to your site a few times and it is truly impressive how these photos can tickle one's imagination. It is often sad to see great buildings in such miserable state of abandonment.
 

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Very cool! I have been to your site a few times and it is truly impressive how these photos can tickle one's imagination. It is often sad to see great buildings in such miserable state of abandonment.
I have been to your site several times too (I beleive wada linked to it) Nice work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
True. But under the right circumstances, abandoned and decayed buildings can inspire poetry.

OTOH, if the old HOA building were in Mt. Vernon, none of us could afford the condos that would be in it.
Speaking of which... does anyone know whats going on with the old hotel Brexton? I noticed its got new windows and possibly a roof but the inside still looks pretty rough and Id like to get a peek.
 

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I think there is some hope that Naing will break the curse of failed rehabs at that property. Here is an article from one month ago from the Daily Record:

Boutique hotel at the historic Brexton building in Baltimore?
May 10, 2007 by Jen Degregorio

Richard Naing, the developer known for his plans to build two 60- story skyscrapers near Baltimore's City Hall, has set his sights on another ambitious city real estate project: restoring the historic Brexton building to its former glory.

Many developers have tried and failed at the same task, leaving a series of discarded plans in their wake. One proposed creating a bed- and-breakfast, another thought a dance club might work. But the building's physical quirkiness and extreme state of decay has thwarted developers every time.
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Naing, however, has confidence that his company, RWN Development Group LLC, can accomplish what others could not. He wants to create a boutique hotel inside the Brexton, retuning the castle-like, 19th century building to its roots. Last used in the late 1980s for apartments, the building was at one time a residential hotel.

"I've done 30 years of historic rehab, and I know exactly what I'm doing," said Naing, who bought the building this week from an investor who forfeited plans to convert the building into upscale condominiums. "We will not fail."

Naing said he paid about $750,000 for the Brexton. He said he expects to invest about $2 million or more to convert the building into a small hotel with a high-end restaurant on the ground floor. He said he has no illusions about the difficulties of retrofitting the awkwardly shaped structure for a modern use.
 

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I would have to agree with you Peter. I really admire Naing's gung-ho mentality. If he doesn't have confidence in his projects, than who will? I just wish alot of other developers that propose developments here thought the same way.
 
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