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Iowa Hawkeyes

College:
1x Champion:
1958

Kinnick Stadium, home for the Iowa football team, is in its 77th season of hosting Hawkeye football games. One of the 25 largest college owned stadiums in the nation and one of college football's finest facilities, Kinnick Stadium is routinely filled on Saturdays each fall.

A two-year, $88 million restoration and renovation project for the stadium was completed prior to the start of the 2006 season. The project, which was the largest such undertaking ever for Iowa athletics, includes an entirely new south endzone and a new press and hospitality facility. The endzone project, which included new lockerrooms, training room and media facilities for the Hawkeye football team on game days, was completed prior to the 2005 season. The new four-level press and hospitality facility will be operational for the 2006 season. The facility extends the full length of the west side of the stadium. It includes 47 private viewing suites and over 1,000 club seats.

The renovation also provides a new entry plaza to the south entrance, wider seats throughout most of the stadium, new and upgraded restroom facilities and concession areas, new scoreboards and a modernized sound system. It also raised the official capacity of Kinnick Stadium to 70,585.

Iowa draws sellout crowds for a majority of all home games, including all 12 home games in the last two years and 17 straight games over the past three seasons.

The Hawkeyes annually rank among the top 25 schools in the nation in home attendance. Iowa ranked 21st in home attendance in 2005 with its average of 70,585. Big Ten Conference football games in 2005 drew over 5 million fans as the conference annually ranks first or second nationally in home attendance. Conference games a year ago averaged over 72,000 fans per contest.

Construction on the original 53,000-seat stadium was completed Oct. 5, 1929 at a cost of $497,151.42. Original construction took six months, but it has undergone several facelifts since. Seats were added to the south end zone in 1956, raising the capacity to 60,000. The north end zone was enclosed and capacity increased to 66,000 prior to the 1983 season. With three more expansion projects completed since, Kinnick now seats 70,585. Kinnick Stadium has 20 miles of bleacher seats and is 79 rows high on each side.

Beside the expansions, an artificial surface was installed in 1972. That carpet was replaced in 1981. Prior to the 1989 season a natural grass playing field, Prescription Athletic Turf, was installed. The playing surface was replaced with new sod prior to the 1997 season and during the 2005 season.

The original five floor press box was constructed in 1958 at a cost of $490,628.62, and was located between the 25 yard lines on the west side of the stadium. Between 1995 and 1999, the Kinnick Stadium press box underwent a $3 million improvement and renovation project, which included the addition of 18 private viewing suites and the remodeling of all five levels. The original press box was demolished in December 2005.

Spectators attending home games of the Iowa Hawkeyes enjoy all the benefits of watching a game on television, thanks to the installation of all new video boards and scoreboards in 2005. The large scale video display units offer spectators live game action, instant replays and other features, such as highlights from other college football games being played across the nation. A complete new sound system was also installed.

Kinnick Stadium has a rich history, beginning with a 46 0 Hawkeye win over Monmouth in the facility's first game. The Hawkeyes tied Illinois 7 7 in the dedication game Oct. 19, 1929.

In 1972, the name was changed from Iowa Stadium to Kinnick Stadium in honor of Iowa's 1939 Heisman Trophy winner, Nile Kinnick. His No. 24 jersey was retired by the school because of his success as a scholar-athlete at the University.

Iowa's all time record in Kinnick Stadium is 228-157-15. Iowa's longest home winning streak of 22 games spanned the 2002 to 2005 seasons. The Hawkeyes have had 11 undefeated home seasons, including both 2003 and 2004. Iowa posted a 5-1 home record in 2005 and a 6-1 mark in 2002.

 

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Kinnick Stadium, home for the Iowa football team, is in its 77th season of hosting Hawkeye football games. One of the 25 largest college owned stadiums in the nation and one of college football's finest facilities, Kinnick Stadium is routinely filled on Saturdays each fall.

A two-year, $88 million restoration and renovation project for the stadium was completed prior to the start of the 2006 season. The project, which was the largest such undertaking ever for Iowa athletics, includes an entirely new south endzone and a new press and hospitality facility. The endzone project, which included new lockerrooms, training room and media facilities for the Hawkeye football team on game days, was completed prior to the 2005 season. The new four-level press and hospitality facility will be operational for the 2006 season. The facility extends the full length of the west side of the stadium. It includes 47 private viewing suites and over 1,000 club seats.

The renovation also provides a new entry plaza to the south entrance, wider seats throughout most of the stadium, new and upgraded restroom facilities and concession areas, new scoreboards and a modernized sound system. It also raised the official capacity of Kinnick Stadium to 70,585.

Iowa draws sellout crowds for a majority of all home games, including all 12 home games in the last two years and 17 straight games over the past three seasons.

The Hawkeyes annually rank among the top 25 schools in the nation in home attendance. Iowa ranked 21st in home attendance in 2005 with its average of 70,585. Big Ten Conference football games in 2005 drew over 5 million fans as the conference annually ranks first or second nationally in home attendance. Conference games a year ago averaged over 72,000 fans per contest.

Construction on the original 53,000-seat stadium was completed Oct. 5, 1929 at a cost of $497,151.42. Original construction took six months, but it has undergone several facelifts since. Seats were added to the south end zone in 1956, raising the capacity to 60,000. The north end zone was enclosed and capacity increased to 66,000 prior to the 1983 season. With three more expansion projects completed since, Kinnick now seats 70,585. Kinnick Stadium has 20 miles of bleacher seats and is 79 rows high on each side.

Beside the expansions, an artificial surface was installed in 1972. That carpet was replaced in 1981. Prior to the 1989 season a natural grass playing field, Prescription Athletic Turf, was installed. The playing surface was replaced with new sod prior to the 1997 season and during the 2005 season.

The original five floor press box was constructed in 1958 at a cost of $490,628.62, and was located between the 25 yard lines on the west side of the stadium. Between 1995 and 1999, the Kinnick Stadium press box underwent a $3 million improvement and renovation project, which included the addition of 18 private viewing suites and the remodeling of all five levels. The original press box was demolished in December 2005.

Spectators attending home games of the Iowa Hawkeyes enjoy all the benefits of watching a game on television, thanks to the installation of all new video boards and scoreboards in 2005. The large scale video display units offer spectators live game action, instant replays and other features, such as highlights from other college football games being played across the nation. A complete new sound system was also installed.

Kinnick Stadium has a rich history, beginning with a 46 0 Hawkeye win over Monmouth in the facility's first game. The Hawkeyes tied Illinois 7 7 in the dedication game Oct. 19, 1929.

In 1972, the name was changed from Iowa Stadium to Kinnick Stadium in honor of Iowa's 1939 Heisman Trophy winner, Nile Kinnick. His No. 24 jersey was retired by the school because of his success as a scholar-athlete at the University.

Iowa's all time record in Kinnick Stadium is 228-157-15. Iowa's longest home winning streak of 22 games spanned the 2002 to 2005 seasons. The Hawkeyes have had 11 undefeated home seasons, including both 2003 and 2004. Iowa posted a 5-1 home record in 2005 and a 6-1 mark in 2002.



Old thread had an error.
 

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thanks sercan sorry about the error im still learning here didnt see this posted by anybody bust saw a lot of other big ten stadiums so i thought it would be a nice addition a great old stadium. I goto all the home games there its a lot of fun and a great destination for college football if anybody ever wants to goto a road game in the big ten this is a great place to visit.
 

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With approval from the Board of Regents next week, an elaborate renovation of Kinnick Stadium’s North End Zone can officially begin.

The Regents will be asked to approve an $89.9 million budget — a far more costly price tag than the July 2015 estimate of $35 million to $45 million — for the Iowa athletics department to deliver what head football coach Kirk Ferentz called a “spectacular” vision.

According to the Regents documents made public Tuesday, the project would replace the existing cramped, general-admission quarters in the North End Zone with “upper and lower general admission seating bowls, two general admission concourses and a premium club level.” The club level could also be used for “non-game-day uses.”

The proposal calls for a new skywalk to be installed between the West Campus Transportation Center to provide club-level access.

This would be the first multi-tiered portion of Kinnick Stadium. According to the documents and artist's renderings supplied to the Register, the lower level would provide standard seating, while the upper level would have seating plus “open decks at the east and west ends with views to the field and places where fans can congregate.”

Construction, if approved, would begin prior to the 2017 season, with the lower/upper level seating in place by the 2018 season. According to the documents, "all construction is to be complete" before the 2019 season. Total seating the renovated end zone would be 10,234 — 8,516 general admission, 1,570 outdoor club seats and 148 loge/premium patio space.
www.hawkcentral.com/story/sports/college/iowa/football/2016/10/11/spectacular-kinnick-stadium-north-end-zone-renovation-kirk-ferentz/91910760/
 

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Looks pretty good. More harmonious with the south end stand and generally in keeping with the overall style of the stadium now. Likely no major impact on overall capacity, though. I would've assumed their typically rabid following could've squeezed in a few more butts, though I haven't checked to see if they're still routinely selling out.

Recall their fans were quite nice down at the Orange Bowl when GT played them.
 

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Well, when one of your theme songs is "In Heaven There is No Beer...," you're bound to gain a reputation as a fun-loving bunch.
 
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Above view from September with the adjacent Children's Hospital to the left. The new 'Iowa Wave' tradition between fans and the patients made national headlines throughout season.


 

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Also why is this in the 'Proposed' section? Kinnick has been around for 90 years.
a) With the new structure now going up this has been moved to "Construction." (Thanks for the image)
b) Existing structures that are being renovated are moved in forums based on the status of the proposal.
 
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According to this link, some seating will be in place by the 2018 season, but completion of the project won't be until 2019.
That's correct. It says the upper/lower seating will be ready and I've been tracking that the club area will not be ready (middle seating, pic below). I've asked around without a clear answer as to if that section will be empty for 2018. If the club area isn't complete, can it be open as just general admission seating?

 
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