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Elahiye, Farmaniyeh or Velenjek, they don't reflect the reality of Tehran.
They don't but even they dont have proper pedestrian walk ways.

That's your problem, you always compare Tehran with Baghdad or Kabul, such mentality has always kept us backward. No offense.
The Shah was a dictator and I am not her to defend him. But one of his biggest mistakes was to compare Iran to Europe and raise expectations.

The IR has managed to do the opposite. Many compare Tehran to Kabul and Baghdad or blame sanctions.

The IR is responsible for sanctions and even without it, poor planning and having no organization has made Tehran a shithole. I rather go straight to Kerman or Shiraz than spend an extra minute in that unlivable, overcrowded ugly city.


Indeed. Tehran has good infrastructure, but looks ugly.
I wanted to like your post but the above disqualified you of any credibility. Infrastructure is not good. Getting a small permit or getting from A to B takes ages.


Tehran is better than Karachi, Kabul, Baghdad or Cairo.

But cities like Astana, Baku, Istanbul, Beirut, Tel Aviv, and Persian Gulf cities are a different level.

Tehran is over crowded, has high pollution, no outdoor activity culture, other than some families sitting in parks, no night life, poor lighting, no designated areas for anything, buildings don't match, few tourist attractions, poor quality pedestraian walk ways, no really modern areas.
 

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I wanted to like your post but the above disqualified you of any credibility. Infrastructure is not good. Getting a small permit or getting from A to B takes ages.
I'm not sure why you quoted my post in your comment, but i'm objective, i'm the one who is criticizing here. I have traveled to many countries, saw many cities (from western Europe, to south America and eastern Asia) and i've said this many times, Tehran has nothing to offer, It's a boring city. Tehran has no nightlife, no freedom, no bars, no historic center, the pedestrian zones look ugly, the historic sites are neglected, except for some Qajari palaces, the old buildings look ugly and they need renovation.

But however it has good infrastructure. Tehran has good highways, in many areas you have access to metro, every neighborhood has a local super market, huge malls getting built in every district, buses arrive at the bus stop every minute on average, Tehran has many restaurants, tea houses, coffee shops, parks, the city looks very clean, etc.
Tehran is over crowded, has high pollution, no outdoor activity culture, other than some families sitting in parks, no night life, poor lighting, no designated areas for anything, buildings don't match, few tourist attractions, poor quality pedestraian walk ways, no really modern areas.
+1
I mentioned all of them in my previous posts, in Tehran you can't even find a beautiful pedestrian zone, all of them look chaotic, stores are covered with ugly plastic billboards, some buildings are really ugly, the historic sites like Tajrish, Grand Bazaar, Nasser Khosro, etc. haven't been renovated, the old buildings are neglected, you can't even find a historic neighborhood to walk at nights.

As i said before, even places where the people hang out (like Darband, Tajrish, Bam, etc.), aren't good enough. Tehran really needs some new pedestrian zones, they should build them as soon as possible, either by renovating the historic sites or building new ones.

A historic center gives a sense of place, identity and meaning to the city. Seriously, what do you expect when Tehran lacks a historic center?
I don't understand why some people think Tehran is a great city. I mean, does our government even know what a tourist expects from a city which had to spend at least 1000 euroes to come and visit?

Plus, it doesn't matter if they think Tehran is nice or not, they would always prefer cities live Beirut, Tel Aviv, Baku, Istanbul over Tehran.

I rather go straight to Kerman or Shiraz than spend an extra minute in that unlivable, overcrowded ugly city.
Here is the problem, i would live in an overcrowded city, i can even tolerate Tehran air pollution, but only if we had a secular government and society. I want to live in a country where the government respects the rights of its own people, not every day hearing about the religious police arresting people, Ansar Hizbullah closing concerts, Basij patrolling the streets, the hardliners holding religious ceremonies or anti-west protests...
 

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I'm not sure why you quoted my post in your comment, but i'm objective, i'm the one who is criticizing here. I have traveled to many countries, saw many cities (from western Europe, to south America and eastern Asia) and i've said this many times, Tehran has nothing to offer, It's a boring city. Tehran has no nightlife, no freedom, no bars, no historic center, the pedestrian zones look ugly, the historic sites are neglected, except for some Qajari palaces, the old buildings look ugly and they need renovation.

But however it has good infrastructure. Tehran has good highways, in many areas you have access to metro, every neighborhood has a local super market, huge malls getting built in every district, buses arrive at the bus stop every minute on average, Tehran has many restaurants, tea houses, coffee shops, parks, the city looks very clean, etc.

+1
I mentioned all of them in my previous posts, in Tehran you can't even find a beautiful pedestrian zone, all of them look chaotic, stores are covered with ugly plastic billboards, some buildings are really ugly, the historic sites like Tajrish, Grand Bazaar, Nasser Khosro, etc. haven't been renovated, the old buildings are neglected, you can't even find a historic neighborhood to walk at nights.

As i said before, even places where the people hang out (like Darband, Tajrish, Bam, etc.), aren't good enough. Tehran really needs some new pedestrian zones, they should build them as soon as possible, either by renovating the historic sites or building new ones.

A historic center gives a sense of place, identity and meaning to the city. Seriously, what do you expect when Tehran lacks a historic center?
I don't understand why some people think Tehran is a great city. I mean, does our government even know what a tourist expects from a city which had to spend at least 1000 euroes to come and visit?

Plus, it doesn't matter if they think Tehran is nice or not, they would always prefer cities live Beirut, Tel Aviv, Baku, Istanbul over Tehran.


Here is the problem, i would live in an overcrowded city, i can even tolerate Tehran air pollution, but only if we had a secular government and society. I want to live in a country where the government respects the rights of its own people, not every day hearing about the religious police arresting people, Ansar Hizbullah closing concerts, Basij patrolling the streets, the hardliners holding religious ceremonies or anti-west protests...
Ok, I misunderstood you, I actually agree to all you say.

But to me good infrastructure means getting from A to B in a reasonable amount of time. Not the case in Tehran. I also think NY and LA have horrible infrastructure.

So does Istanbul, but it offers many other things, that as you correctly said Tehran lacks.
 

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slum areas

Iranian government has proposed the allocation of 4.7 trillion rials ($145.8 million) for upgrading informal settlements on the outskirts of urban areas in the annual budget for 2017-18, said Mohammad Saeid Izadi, deputy minister of roads and urban development.

The official noted that the budget was 370 billion rials ($11.4 million) for the current fiscal year (started March 20), Roads Ministry’s news service reported on Monday.

The deputy minister noted that enhancing the living condition at city margins are of high importance for the government as “about 19 million people are living in informal settlements near large cities”.


Izadi added that the ministry is working on plans to utilize charities and private sector’s potentials for renovating distressed areas near cities.
https://financialtribune.com/articles/economy-business-and-markets/55774/bigger-budget-for-informal-settlements


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Good news if true. Hopefully get's implemented.

https://financialtribune.com/articles/art-and-culture/56703/uniform-lighting-plan-for-tehran

A comprehensive plan for public lighting in the capital Tehran will be devised by the end of current fiscal year in March, according to a member of the Lighting Committee of the Tehran Beautification Organization (TBO), affiliated to Tehran Municipality.

Once the project is finalized, all the urban lighting projects in the capital should follow the regulations stipulated in the plan, said Babak Seyrafi, according to the public relations of the TBO. Based on the comprehensive plan, all residential, commercial, historical and religious places in the city will be identified for preparation of a uniform lighting plan.

“The neon lights and signboards of commercial units have distorted the city’s urban landscape to a great extent. They are not in harmony with surrounding architecture and contribute to the huge waste of energy,” Seyrafi said.

He said the lack of desirable lighting in green spaces may create public insecurity, but more importantly, “the imposing and aggressive lights of many shops and commercial units are inappropriate to their surrounding environment and disturbing to neighborhoods.”

Two special commissions of the Lighting Committee, ‘Urban Development and Architecture’ and ‘Power and Electronics,’ will review the plans submitted with regard to practicality, implementation methods, quality and materials for the project.

Opinion of experts in the commissions will be considered before the committee finalizes the comprehensive plan for public lighting in Tehran before the year is out
 

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check this out!
Iran’s MPs vote to end 'Mehr' housing project
Iran’s media on Tuesday cheered as the Parliament voted to end a hefty housing project that President Hassan Rouhani had previously blamed for shooting up inflation to above 40 percent over the past years.

The Parliamentarians in their debates over Iran’s Sixth Five-Year National Development Plan (2020-2025) voted to have Maskan Bank allocate the required funds for completing the remaining phases of ‘Mehr’ (kindness in Persian) housing project which was a main brainchild of former president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad (2005-2013).

No more new Mehr houses should be built, the MPs made it clear through an overwhelming approval. The move is already seen as significant for releasing huge amounts from the annual national development budgets that should have otherwise been spent on the scheme that had drawn serious criticisms by Rouhani’s government.

“Mehr Housing Now History,” wrote Arman Emrooz in an article on its front page. “Goodbye Mehr Housing,” wrote another daily – Jam-e Jam. Sharq newspaper described Mehr housing as a “burden” for Iran’s economy.

“Finally, the fate of a heritage of the 10th government [of former president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad] was determined,” wrote Etemad newspaper. “The 11th government [of President Hassan Rouhani] had inherited lots of unfinished projects with huge debts that still needed to be settled. More importantly, this government had to respond to the shortcomings of its predecessor while it was not involved in anything related to them.”
http://www.presstv.ir/Detail/2017/01/03/504637/Irans-MPs-vote-to-end-Mehr-housing-project/
 

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^^ they officially closed the "account" towards any payments to mehr housing , meaning from this date forward they will not make any new projects
The announcement from 3 years ago was to end all existing projects and then once they finish not to plan any newer ones

So this means that all mehr projects now have come to and end (im sure there are still many areas that have been neglected though)
 

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The topic was discussed at the debated yesterday.

Gov't Shifting Housing Policy Toward Urban Renewal

President Hassan Rouhani's policy regarding the housing sector revolves around moving away from construction in underdeveloped areas as in the Mehr Housing Plan and supporting distressed urban areas, the minister of roads and urban development said.

"The policy we have pursued in [Rouhani's] government is moving toward first-time homebuyers, therefore out policy is to promote savings for buying a house and support the purchase of first-time homebuyers," Abbas Akhoundi was also reported as saying by ILNA.

Pointing to Social Housing Plan, he added that the next policy is to "follow up the implementation of the scheme in distressed and urban areas instead of building homes in deserts", in reference to the Mehr Housing Plan initiated by the previous administration, which focused on mass construction in remote areas.

The Social Housing Plan is a subcategory of the government's Comprehensive Housing Plan that incorporates programs to provide low-income groups with affordable housing. It covers 3-4 million households and as announced in mid-April by deputy for municipal affairs with the Islamic Revolution Housing Foundation, Javad Haqshenas, it will be implemented in two months "after earmarking its budget".

The third policy, Akhoundi added, revolves around supporting people living on the outskirts of cities "and people who really need better housing conditions".

The minister reiterated that there are currently 2.587 million empty residential units in the country. He said if the cost of constructing each unit is to average $100,000,this means that more than $250 billion of Iranian capital have been left unused and "wasted away with wrong policies".

Noting that many of these empty units are located in the northern and affluent part of cities, especially Tehran, Akhoundi added that more than 19 million people are living in very poor housing conditions.

"This shows that the wealth of the nation has been used with zero efficiency," he said.

https://financialtribune.com/articl...-shifting-housing-policy-toward-urban-renewal
 

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Pedestrian walkways, bike lanes, green spaces: An unusual election platform for a politician in Iran

he cellphone rang, filling the salon of the cozy walk-up apartment with the sound of classical music that reverberated off the cream-colored walls lined with landscape paintings and contemporary sketches.

Taraneh Yalda, a 62-year-old architect, answered the call. It was a colleague inviting her to his gallery in Tehran, but they had more than art and design to discuss.

Last month, in a surprise, Yalda won the approval of Iran’s conservative election monitors to run for a seat on Tehran’s City Council. Hailing from a family of artists and musicians, and educated in Italy and France, Yalda is one of a handful of progressive candidates in a field of more than 2,700 vying for 21 places on the council.

The municipal election takes place May 19, the same day as the presidential contest in which incumbent Hassan Rouhani, a relative moderate, is seeking a second four-year term. While most of Iran is fixated on the presidential vote, Yalda’s candidacy has won attention from the capital’s urbane, educated set.

This city is a tremendous, sprawling monster. ... I want to humanize the character of the city.
— Taraneh Yalda

Since the 1979 Islamic Revolution, Yalda’s supporters say, Tehran has never had a prominent architect or city planner serve on the City Council. The current council has attempted to enforce gender segregation laws by separating men’s and women’s offices in municipal buildings, and morality police occasionally patrol the streets to limit intermingling of the sexes in public spaces.

Yalda opposes such steps. Warm and grandmotherly, with henna-dyed hair under a patterned headscarf, she speaks of making Tehran, whose gray air and gridlocked freeways are reminiscent of 1970s Los Angeles, a more “humane” city.

Like an Iranian Jane Jacobs — the American writer who fought to save New York’s Greenwich Village from developers in the 1960s — she supports revitalizing Tehran’s old neighborhoods by creating bicycle lanes and pedestrian-friendly zones so that residents, particularly women, can walk more safely.

“This city is a tremendous, sprawling monster,” she told her artist friend. “It is imposing itself on the minds and hearts of its inhabitants. I want to humanize the character of the city.”

Urban planning is not a forte in much of the Middle East, where cities grow haphazardly and roads and concrete towers spring more often from bribery and corruption than any master plan. In a televised presidential debate in April, Rouhani accused Tehran’s mayor, Mohammad Bagher Qalibaf, of allowing high-rises to proliferate unchecked, destroying the small gardens that once dotted the city of 9 million.

Asked how she would battle Tehran’s “construction mafia,” Yalda invoked an example from Italy, where she earned a doctorate in architecture from Polytechnic University of Turin in 1978.

“I won’t fight directly with any group with vested interests, but I would try to convince the mafia to change the way the Mafia in Palermo, Sicily, was changed starting in 1992,” the year that popular opposition to the violent crime bosses began to turn the tide against the Italian Mafia.

She went on to study in Paris, where she learned how a city can have “its own rights and personality.” She was living in France when the Islamic Revolution toppled Iran’s Western-backed shah, and she rushed back to her country, hoping to witness the start of a more equitable and populist regime.

“Things went differently from what we wished,” she said, sipping tea from an elegant white cup. “We struggled, but we are not disheartened.”

While Iran’s ruling mullahs have largely marginalized secular intellectuals, Yalda maintains an active professional life, designing private homes for the well -heeled and advising planners in Tehran and other cities.

She has translated scores of works on urbanization, including “Invisible Cities,” a 1972 novel by the Italian writer Italo Calvino that imagines the travels of the explorer Marco Polo — and that sits on a table in her living room. She also writes columns in newspapers published by Iranian reformists, who oppose the theocracy, agitate for greater social freedoms and generally back Rouhani for reelection.

Many believe that Yalda’s election hopes rest with being formally endorsed by reformist politicians and named to their slate of 21 City Council candidates. With more than 700 reformist candidates, however, her selection is far from assured.

“If the reformists want me and put me on their list, I would appreciate that,” she said. “If not, it is their loss. I am a ‘doctor of cities’ and I know how to cure a sick city.”

She had never run for office before, but in March, a friend of her son, who is studying in the United States, got in touch to wish her a happy Persian New Year. The friend, editor of an architectural weekly, said she should run and “fight for your beloved city.”

“Oh, my God, that’s a good idea,” Yalda recalled saying.

The election monitoring board, made up of members of the Iranian parliament, allowed several former political prisoners and civil society activists to run for city council. To reformists and moderates, it was a sign of their increasing political power since February 2016, when they swept all 30 parliamentary seats in Tehran in what was a strong vote of confidence for Rouhani.

Yalda was surrounded at her home on a recent afternoon by a gaggle of supporters — artists, architects, painters, theater and cinema actors and volunteers. Her fans have launched a channel on Telegram, a popular messaging app, called “Taraneh of Tehran”; taraneh is Persian for “song.”

Asked what she would do if she lost, Yalda shrugged.

“It is my daily routine to write about my darling, patient city, so I will keep that up,” she said. “But at least I will fight for the sake of my city during my campaign.”

http://www.latimes.com/world/la-fg-iran-tehran-candidate-2017-story.html
 

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^^ I have heard alot of news about her from the artistic community and read a few of her statements and interviews after seeing your posts. here we see the most classical example of someone who seems to care, but sadly there is almost 0 chance to see someone with her vision and background to win. she is "too good" and "caring" to win, its like putting up a hunting match between a pack of wolves and a human that believes in no bloodshed

i hope , deeply that these types of people start to take over but they need some bit of ruggedness and ruthlessness to even have a chance at things in their Current condition. hopefully that will change, i even hope her and the like win now

but all aside, her fight can symbolize and influence a new generation of people to be more expressive about their concerns for the city and country, and maybe a large change can be made when people like here emerge more and more
 

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^^ I have heard alot of news about her from the artistic community and read a few of her statements and interviews after seeing your posts. here we see the most classical example of someone who seems to care, but sadly there is almost 0 chance to see someone with her vision and background to win. she is "too good" and "caring" to win, its like putting up a hunting match between a pack of wolves and a human that believes in no bloodshed

i hope , deeply that these types of people start to take over but they need some bit of ruggedness and ruthlessness to even have a chance at things in their Current condition. hopefully that will change, i even hope her and the like win now

but all aside, her fight can symbolize and influence a new generation of people to be more expressive about their concerns for the city and country, and maybe a large change can be made when people like here emerge more and more
Don't agree at all. If she has enough publicity and people know of her then she will win. You don't need ruggedness to get people to vote for you. Otherwise, we would not have the likes of Khatami or Rouhani winning elections. If enough people know about you and your vision you can win.
 

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^^ but having a large public base and publicity needs money, proof (of an industry) ,adverts , connections

If iranian politics were fully transparent and generoys especially on smaller scale units of governing , i would agree 100% , and i think people like this certainly will win

But i think the obstacles now for such person are a bit too much, unless she becomes so popular and supported that it will overturn the obstacles

Rouhani and khatami both had some foodthold in the system , they are also clergymen ; males too. I think her job is a bit harder. The only way is massive support , bit it seems not many people have heard of her
I hope i am wrong
 

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^^ but having a large public base and publicity needs money, proof (of an industry) ,adverts , connections

If iranian politics were fully transparent and generoys especially on smaller scale units of governing , i would agree 100% , and i think people like this certainly will win

But i think the obstacles now for such person are a bit too much, unless she becomes so popular and supported that it will overturn the obstacles

Rouhani and khatami both had some foodthold in the system , they are also clergymen ; males too. I think her job is a bit harder. The only way is massive support , bit it seems not many people have heard of her
I hope i am wrong
Through social media you don't need money... I have seen her videos and pictures shared quite often. Let's see!
 

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Would also be really nice if 60+ aged mullahs and the people close to them wouldn't get a guaranteed spot just because of their affiliation in all relevant positions of power.
 

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Eco-Friendly Car for Police Fleet




Tehran Police will equip its car fleet with eco-friendly vehicles to help protect the environment and curb air pollution. For this purpose it has selected the Hyundai Elantra hybrid, Tasnim News Agency reported. The report does not say anything about the number of cars to join the fleet. Elantra hybrid is currently on test run and will be delivered to the Traffic Police and Law Enforcement Forces in the near future. It uses a 1.6-liter engine fuelled by liquefied petroleum gas with power supplemented by a 15kW electric engine propelled by lithium-ion polymer batteries. The Elantra hybrid electric vehicle is considered a pioneer for Kia’s eco-cars. Back in February, in a move to overhaul the police fleet, 200 units of the South Korean Kia Cerato were handed over to the LEF and Traffic Police in Tehran. Police have been using the locally-made Iran Khodro Samand as the vehicle of choice for the past couple of years.

https://financialtribune.com/articles/auto/75393/eco-friendly-car-for-police-fleet
 
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