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Iranian Cabbies Criticize Costly Renovation Scheme



Many drivers on the renovation scheme website have complained that they can neither afford the initial down payment nor the installments. One driver says “We hardly make ends meet. How are we supposed to repay such high debts?”

Head of Iran’s taxi union says by February 2016 there were 185,000 gas guzzlers in the national taxi fleet. Through the renovation scheme, 61,000 old taxis have been sent to the junkyard and replaced with new cars


I n a bid to curb air pollution in cities, the government in collaboration with local banks and carmakers introduced a taxi renovation scheme in 2016 named Nosazi. The plan (sending the old cabs to the junkyard in exchange for a new vehicle) has been successful to some extent but many taxi drivers say they simply cannot afford the new cars despite the bank loan.

For participating in the scheme, cabbies are required to register their old clunkers on the website Nosazi.org. According to the website, their cars need to be over ten years old to be eligible for enrollment.

After enrollment, each driver needs to deliver his old car to the scrap yard to be able to get a 50-million-rial ($1,160) coupon. Through the scheme, they are given 200 million rials ($4,600) in loan at 16% which they are required to pay back in 48 monthly installments of 5.7 million rials ($132).

The drivers have four options to choose the replacement to their old car: Iran Khodro’s Samand or Peugeot 405, or SAIPA’s Ario (Zotye Z300) or Pars Khodro’s Chinese-derived Brilliance H230.

After the coupon value and the loan are reduced from the vehicle’s total price, the driver needs to pay the remaining upfront, which for Samand translates into $3,500 down payment, $1,600 for the Peugeot 405, Ario $5,800 and Brilliance $4,600 in rial equivalent.

Many drivers on the renovation scheme website have posted comments that they neither can afford the initial payment nor the monthly installments.

Not playing with words, one driver writes, “We hardly make ends meet. How are we supposed to pay such a huge debt?”

Another driver writes, “Maybe in major cities, drivers are better off and can afford the installments and initial payments. In provincial towns that is almost impossible.”

The comments do not end here. Many taxi drivers have called on authorities to widen the choice of vehicles offered through the scheme. For instance one writes that drivers should be allowed to choose whichever version of each model they want. Currently, drivers can only pick the model.

Furthermore, one of the other complaints in the comments is that the vehicle’s age is not a reasonable measure for assigning the cabs to the scrap yard. One driver who owns a 2013-built Samand says his vehicle is so worn out that it is unfit for the roads but he is not eligible for enrolment. He adds that he cannot afford to replace the car on his own (without the bank loan).

With 80,000 pollution-related deaths every year, Iran is among the top five countries in terms of air pollution mortality.

In Tehran, outdated vehicles are said to be responsible for a staggering 80% of the air pollution. Taxis, which hardly account for 2% of the public transport fleet, contribute 18% to the toxic air.

Tehran Municipality’s environment and sustainable development department director Sadr Alipour says, “There are 80,000 taxis in Tehran of which 11,000 (26%) are worn out and should be replaced.”

Union’s Support

The renovation scheme has the support of Islamic Republic of Iran Taxi Union. The union head Morteza Zameni says, “When the renovation scheme was launched in February 2016, there were 185,000 gas guzzlers in the taxi fleet. Through the scheme, 61,000 of the old taxis are now in the junkyard and were replaced with new cars.”

He says by March 2019 all the reaming old taxis will be replaced and adds that replacing the aging taxis is mandatory and municipalities will not issue permits to cabs built 10 years ago.

In the current fiscal that ends in March, 68,000 drivers have registered with the scheme.

The union boss promised that “after the old taxi is scrapped, the owner will receive the new vehicle on the same day.” However, on the Nosazi website, many drivers have complained about delays.

While the introduction of such schemes has always been welcomed by environmentalist, NGOs and the public at large, there is much about that should be revised.

In addition to considering the drivers’ demand for easier installments and reduced initial payments, the policymakers should also reconsider the cars sold through the scheme. Two of the vehicles, namely Peugeot 405 and Samand, have always been singled out by critics for high emissions, poor mileage and flouting safety rules.

https://financialtribune.com/articles/auto/79715/iranian-cabbies-criticize-costly-renovation-scheme
 

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Iranian Cabbies Criticize Costly Renovation Scheme



Many drivers on the renovation scheme website have complained that they can neither afford the initial down payment nor the installments. One driver says “We hardly make ends meet. How are we supposed to repay such high debts?”

Head of Iran’s taxi union says by February 2016 there were 185,000 gas guzzlers in the national taxi fleet. Through the renovation scheme, 61,000 old taxis have been sent to the junkyard and replaced with new cars


I n a bid to curb air pollution in cities, the government in collaboration with local banks and carmakers introduced a taxi renovation scheme in 2016 named Nosazi. The plan (sending the old cabs to the junkyard in exchange for a new vehicle) has been successful to some extent but many taxi drivers say they simply cannot afford the new cars despite the bank loan.

For participating in the scheme, cabbies are required to register their old clunkers on the website Nosazi.org. According to the website, their cars need to be over ten years old to be eligible for enrollment.

After enrollment, each driver needs to deliver his old car to the scrap yard to be able to get a 50-million-rial ($1,160) coupon. Through the scheme, they are given 200 million rials ($4,600) in loan at 16% which they are required to pay back in 48 monthly installments of 5.7 million rials ($132).

The drivers have four options to choose the replacement to their old car: Iran Khodro’s Samand or Peugeot 405, or SAIPA’s Ario (Zotye Z300) or Pars Khodro’s Chinese-derived Brilliance H230.

After the coupon value and the loan are reduced from the vehicle’s total price, the driver needs to pay the remaining upfront, which for Samand translates into $3,500 down payment, $1,600 for the Peugeot 405, Ario $5,800 and Brilliance $4,600 in rial equivalent.

Many drivers on the renovation scheme website have posted comments that they neither can afford the initial payment nor the monthly installments.

Not playing with words, one driver writes, “We hardly make ends meet. How are we supposed to pay such a huge debt?”

Another driver writes, “Maybe in major cities, drivers are better off and can afford the installments and initial payments. In provincial towns that is almost impossible.”

The comments do not end here. Many taxi drivers have called on authorities to widen the choice of vehicles offered through the scheme. For instance one writes that drivers should be allowed to choose whichever version of each model they want. Currently, drivers can only pick the model.

Furthermore, one of the other complaints in the comments is that the vehicle’s age is not a reasonable measure for assigning the cabs to the scrap yard. One driver who owns a 2013-built Samand says his vehicle is so worn out that it is unfit for the roads but he is not eligible for enrolment. He adds that he cannot afford to replace the car on his own (without the bank loan).

With 80,000 pollution-related deaths every year, Iran is among the top five countries in terms of air pollution mortality.

In Tehran, outdated vehicles are said to be responsible for a staggering 80% of the air pollution. Taxis, which hardly account for 2% of the public transport fleet, contribute 18% to the toxic air.

Tehran Municipality’s environment and sustainable development department director Sadr Alipour says, “There are 80,000 taxis in Tehran of which 11,000 (26%) are worn out and should be replaced.”

Union’s Support

The renovation scheme has the support of Islamic Republic of Iran Taxi Union. The union head Morteza Zameni says, “When the renovation scheme was launched in February 2016, there were 185,000 gas guzzlers in the taxi fleet. Through the scheme, 61,000 of the old taxis are now in the junkyard and were replaced with new cars.”

He says by March 2019 all the reaming old taxis will be replaced and adds that replacing the aging taxis is mandatory and municipalities will not issue permits to cabs built 10 years ago.

In the current fiscal that ends in March, 68,000 drivers have registered with the scheme.

The union boss promised that “after the old taxi is scrapped, the owner will receive the new vehicle on the same day.” However, on the Nosazi website, many drivers have complained about delays.

While the introduction of such schemes has always been welcomed by environmentalist, NGOs and the public at large, there is much about that should be revised.

In addition to considering the drivers’ demand for easier installments and reduced initial payments, the policymakers should also reconsider the cars sold through the scheme. Two of the vehicles, namely Peugeot 405 and Samand, have always been singled out by critics for high emissions, poor mileage and flouting safety rules.

https://financialtribune.com/articles/auto/79715/iranian-cabbies-criticize-costly-renovation-scheme
I don't understand this article. Why change an old car (more than 10 years old) for a peugeot 405 which is itself 30 years old?
 

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Is There an End in Sight to Tehran’s Costly Pollution?


A ir pollution costs Iranians millions of dollars each year in deaths and diseases.

In a major study, the World Bank found that Iran is losing a sizable percentage of its gross domestic product to air pollution. Those costs are mainly driven by lost productivity, since schools and factories are shut down on bad air days to avoid the dangerous health effects of breathing the dense, toxic air.

These concerns are echoed by Iranian officials, media broadcasters and the press time and again. It seems as if they are engaged in a substitution drill to practice their language skills by incorporating different figures into overused phrases.

It’s more than 37 years since 240 university professors and experts published a report titled “Policies on Development and Advancement of the Islamic Republic of Iran”, in which they wrote about virtually the same causes, effects and solutions to air pollution that are being talked about today, the head of Tehran city’s office of the Department of Environment, Mohammad Hossein Bazgir, told Financial Tribune. Highlights of his interview follow:

With a population of 8.7 million spread over 730 square kilometers, Tehran’s population density is around 10,000 people per square km. For Iran, it stands at 49.1.

Tehran ranks between 25th and 28th in view of population, but 128th in terms of size among world cities.

In the fiscal 1956-57, the city of Tehran constituted 90% of the size of Tehran Province, which share in 2016-17 declined to 65.8% while its population doubled.

The capital turned from a city situated on vast plains and woods in a sparsely populated province to an overcrowded city surrounded by several densely populated townships, including Rey, Shahryar, Eslamshahr, Shahr-e Qods and Malard. Now you cannot talk about Tehran’s air pollution without taking into account its satellite cities.

Numerous manufacturing and service industries have also sprung up in Tehran over the years. There are up to 17,000 factories from casting to steelmaking there, constituting 30% of the Iranian industries. Some 7,000 hospitals and 500 doctors’ office buildings have been set up in Tehran.

It is Iran’s administrative hub and Iranians all over the country have to visit the capital city to meet their needs.

All this comes as Tehran’s ecological goods and services are not sufficient to provide for its population and the industrial activities loaded into it.

Extravagant Lifestyle

Lifestyle is also to blame for Tehran’s air pollution. As much as 12.4 million liters of gasoline in the capital city and 16.2 million liters in the province are consumed daily. In fact, residents of Tehran Province consume more gas than Poland, with its 40 million population, and Turkey of 80 million.

Only three countries, namely Germany, Britain, and Spain, consume more gasoline than Iran in the whole Europe. This is while vehicle ownership per capita in Iran is 3-3.5 per 10 people while in Turkey the ratio is more than 5 per 10 persons.

Iranians’ consumerist lifestyle is not limited to this. Water consumption is three times the global average while Iran’s surface water input from snowmelt and rain is one third of the world (around 220-240 millimeters). Residents of Tehran consume 2.6-3.2 million cubic meters of water daily, 50% of which are supplied by underground reserves that are supposed to be saved for future generations.

They produce 8,000 tons of rubbish and 50,000 tons of construction waste daily (and that’s at a time of the sector’s recession). The annual output of Tehran’s wastewater is as much as 850 million cubic meters, two-thirds of which are not treated.

Residents of Tehran inhale nearly half a kilogram of pollutants a day in fall and winter every year. In fact, we have known the causes of air pollution and they are still the same.

Some 30% of Tehran’s air pollution are linked to stationary sources, including factories, power plants, heaters and dry cleaners, while 70% are emitted from mobile sources, namely motor vehicles, airplanes, locomotives, and other engines and equipment that can be moved from one location to another.

Solutions

DOE is t an oversight organization and does not wield any executive power. Separate ministries and organization are responsible for different areas attributable to air pollution.

For example, the onus of ensuring fuel quality is on the Ministry of Petroleum while the Ministry of Industries, Mining and Trade is responsible for clunkers, so car manufacturers should be encouraged to invest in new technologies. The DOE solely sets guidelines.

The quality of fuel needs to be improved based on European emission standards that define the acceptable limits for exhaust emissions of new vehicles. Euro-4 and later Euro-5 concentrated on cleaning up emissions from diesel cars, especially with regard to reducing particulate matter and oxides of nitrogen.

[The pollutant of most concern in Tehran is soot-particles smaller than 2.5 microns that make them tiny enough to get deep into the lungs. It can cause a variety of medical difficulties, including asthma, heart disease and lung cancer.]

As we speak, 89% of vehicles in Tehran are powered by Euro-4 gasoline and 11% by super gasoline. There is no lead in Iranian fuel but we still have a long way to meet standards nationwide.

The quality of cars has also improved compared to 10 years ago, but the problem is that new locally-made cars are of low quality and fall short of the standards a few months after being used.

Tehran Municipality’s newly proposed road traffic scheme is a move forward, should the gains from the new road traffic scheme be spent on tackling air pollution.

Britain is using income inequality to manage its cities. By taxing the rich, they are expanding public transportation for all members of the society.

New Road Traffic Scheme

The new scheme aims to abolish free or discounted permits for members and employees of institutes located in the restricted zones and charge all vehicles equally based on several factors, including the time of commuting and the cars’ pollution standards.

The current restricted zone is to be renamed “Green Zone”, and the area where cars are allowed on alternate days based on their odd-even plate numbers is to be called “Blue Zone”. Other areas will be referred to as “White Zone”.

The system of selling permits for entry is to be replaced by a tax system. People will have to pay variable amounts of tax for entry into the Green and Blue zones, the proceeds from which will be spent on the development of public transport.

Car owners will be given user accounts and the tax will be automatically withdrawn from the account upon entry into the zones. Cameras will record the plate number and the time of commuting, and the tax will be calculated based on predefined formulas.

The tax rates need to gain the approval of Tehran City Council, but the proposed prices range from 100,000 to 360,000 rials ($2.3-8.3) for the Green Zone and 30,000 to 120,000 rials (6 cents-$2.7) for the Blue Zone.

Tehran Mayor Mohammad Ali Najafi claims that the charges for entering the zones will also eventually decrease with appropriate time management.

Currently, daily car permits are sold for 198,000 to 410,000 rials ($4.6-9.3), depending on the time of the day. The restrictions are enforced from 6:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. every day, except for Thursdays, Fridays and public holidays. Those who live inside the restricted zones have until 8:30 a.m. to exit the zone.

Vehicles with premium technical inspection certificates can enjoy a 20% discount. It is not clarified, however, how a car can gain a premium certificate. Hybrid cars are entitled to a 90% discount.

The scheme is expected to reduce heavy traffic during the morning and evening rush hours, as studies have shown that 40% of journeys across Tehran are not time-bound.

https://financialtribune.com/articl...-an-end-in-sight-to-tehran-s-costly-pollution
 

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Three times water consumption
More litres than the whole of turkey

We use three times more water yet many people seem to shower once decade and smell horrible when you sit beside them in metro

Iranians have gone to horrible standards when it comes to these things. We just like to act like royalty but inbthe reality of things we act like clueless people
 

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Three times water consumption
More litres than the whole of turkey

We use three times more water yet many people seem to shower once decade and smell horrible when you sit beside them in metro

Iranians have gone to horrible standards when it comes to these things. We just like to act like royalty but inbthe reality of things we act like clueless people
Because we blame zamin o zamoon for every issue. First we have to help ourselves.
 

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Three times water consumption
More litres than the whole of turkey

We use three times more water yet many people seem to shower once decade and smell horrible when you sit beside them in metro

Iranians have gone to horrible standards when it comes to these things. We just like to act like royalty but inbthe reality of things we act like clueless people
do you know that most of iran water consumption goes to inefficient agricultural practises and doesn't have anything to do with household consumption

And then what does it has to do with people smelling bad in metro???? You think that because you're belonging to the iranian diaspora you can despise iranians still living in Iran by saying that over there they are all dirty and islamists

but you are not at all like them right? You're a civilised iranian... these critics don't apply to you

Remember you belong to the same culture and nation than these dirty people
Not living in Iran doesn't make you superior.
 

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Tehran Municipality Sees Potential in Electric Motorbikes


Tehran Municipality is developing a scheme for replacing fossil fuel powered motorbikes with electric two-wheelers that will include loans with low or zero interest rates

Some 2.5 million carburetor-equipped motorcycles ply Tehran’s almost permanently clogged roads. The amount of fumes each of these motorbikes spew into the air equals eight vehicles with Euro 3 emission standards

T ehran Municipality is of the opinion that electric motorbikes could be a part of the solution to the overcrowded capital’s worsening air pollution.

With 2,600 premature pollution-related deaths every year, Iran is among the top five countries in terms of air pollution mortality. Motorcycles are a major nuisance in the capital and contribute terribly to the toxic air that for years has closed down schools and offices at irregular intervals and filled hospital beds.

The deputy mayor for transportation affairs says that the TM will offer incentives for purchasing electric motorbikes.

“TM is developing a scheme to replace gasoline-powered motorbikes with electric two-wheelers. Loans at low or zero interest rates are to be offered to at least 2,000 people in the initial phase,” IRNA quoted Mohsen Pourseyed Aghaei as saying.

The deputy mayor however concurred that such schemes have no chance of success “unless the government pays its due share and creates the necessary infrastructure, namely setting up of charging stations.”

>Previous Failures

The municipality under the previous mayor Mohammad-Bagher Ghalibaf introduced a similar scheme to offer 25 million rials ($550) in loans to electric bike buyers. The interest rate on the loans was 18%. However, the plan, like many others introduced by the controversial mayor and his minions, failed simply because no one was interested in what the TM was offering.

Now the present mayor, Mohammad Ali Najafi, who took office in the summer, says that scheme fell on the wayside as it was not affordable.

“A fossil fuel powered motorbike costs 15 to 20 million rials ($330 to $440) while the cheapest electric bike in the local market sells for 100 million rials ($2,200).”

After the loan amount was reduced from the price of the electric motorbike, the customer needed to pay the remaining upfront, which for the cheapest e-bike translates into the equivalent of $1,650 down payment.

It merits mention that the main target market of motorbikes in Iran relates to the low-income strata. The nominal monthly minimum wage (announced by the government) for the current fiscal, ending in March, is 9.3 million rials ($204). Simply put, those who need the electric bikes cannot afford it. Period.

Furthermore, Mayor Najafi says, “The prices of imported electric bikes are excessively high and people cannot afford them. A task force has been set up for negotiating with domestic local motorbike makers to see whether their factories can be retrofitted for manufacturing e-bikes.” The mayor notes that such plans demand government-backed investment and meaningful state support.

The sales manager of local motorbike producer Tolidi Niro Mohareke Mohammad Ghorbani, says his company can produce electric bikes but does not see a dynamic market to make such an enterprise economically feasible. “Low demand and lack of charging stations has made us think twice.”

>Charging Stations

TM has also announced plans to set up an EV charging station in District 12. Details are not known, but if constructed this would be Iran’s first commercial charging station.

Energy Ministry’s Niroo Research Institute has designed and constructed a solar-powered electric vehicle and motorbike charging station. It does not offer services to the public yet and is only part of a trial project. Two vehicles and two motorbikes can charge simultaneously at the station.

The organization’s EV department director Ali Bakhshi is of the opinion that, “The local electricity distribution network can offer services to e-bikes but powering electric vehicles would be a major challenge.”

NRI’s priority is to acquire the technology needed for charging stations and create infrastructure needed for powering such stations.

>Beleaguered Industry

Some 2.5 million carburetor-equipped motorcycles ply Tehran’s almost permanently clogged roads. Since they are not equipped with catalyst converters and release toxic fumes directly into the environment, the amount of fumes each of the motorbikes spew into the air equals that of eight vehicles with Euro 3 emission standards. The added problem is that such bikes are fuel-intensive.

As if this was not enough, the outdated motorbikes are the number one culprits in creating noise pollution. It is estimated that in Tehran, motorbikes have a 25% share in air pollution and cause almost half of the noise pollution in and around the city of 12 million people.

The production of carburetor-equipped motorcycles has been banned since September 2016 following a government directive. However, the polluting two-wheelers are still sold in the market.

Aware that the official ban was coming into effect, some manufacturers produced and registered unusually large numbers of carbureted motorcycles earlier to make an extra buck.

According to Abolfazl Hejazi, director of Iran Motorcycle Manufacturers’ Syndicate, 800,000 carbureted motorbikes were produced in the last fiscal that ended in March 2017 while market demand was below 500,000.

“Last year’s motorbikes are still being sold and are expected to remain available in the market until March,” he added.

With their warehouses filled to the rafters with the polluting motorcycles, local producers have significantly cut down output. During the nine months to Dec. 21 motorbike production plummeted 81% with 73,934 units rolling out of local factories.

https://financialtribune.com/articl...ipality-sees-potential-in-electric-motorbikes
 

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do you know that most of iran water consumption goes to inefficient agricultural practises and doesn't have anything to do with household consumption

And then what does it has to do with people smelling bad in metro???? You think that because you're belonging to the iranian diaspora you can despise iranians still living in Iran by saying that over there they are all dirty and islamists

but you are not at all like them right? You're a civilised iranian... these critics don't apply to you

Remember you belong to the same culture and nation than these dirty people
Not living in Iran doesn't make you superior.
Its funny because i think it was me and alexal that were discussing that almost 90 % of iran's water use is agriculture
We know that , but this argument is the usage of iranians for civil uses


Yes many iranians have poor hygene , maybe up to 15% overall, its reality. And its funny because many iranians in the summer waste so much water by washing their cars themselves or even washing the outdoor walls of their house and leaving the shelang open on the garden yet they dont use the water for more beneficial needs


It has nothing to do with diaspora or not
Iranians in iran are the primary critiques of these behaviours

Hala shoma chera narahati? Why do you feel personally offended ? I am iranian and i am not saying this to separate myself

I like my country people to be living as best as they can
 

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khodaish bejae in rozekhunia be mardom began ruzi 1 bar hamum raftan wajebe!buye gand midan tu metro,bade warzesh dush nemigiran,waghean in dush gereftano bayad be in mellat yad dad!enye kamarband imeni ke yad dadan wa mardom balad nabudan,ya bezaran awal mardom piade beshan dar metro wa badesh sawar beshan,ya chetori tu saf raftar konan etc
 

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Hala shoma chera narahati? Why do you feel personally offended ?
Yes these kind of remarks make me uncomfortable because it seems that you're
judging people and in particular the masses with a lot of contempt, it's not the first time you had a similar degrading speech on indigenous populations living in Qeshm, critising their behaviour, the way they were dressed etc...

And again I doubt you would apply these critics you're making on iranians to you.. although you're iranian
how do you explain that? do you think you're different from the other iranians?
 

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Each human is different
Im not the same as all iranians

Do iranians drive bad ? Do many not care for hygene ? Do they not waste water ?

I drive between lines in iran or elsewhere , brush my teeth at least twice a day and care much for my hygene so i am always showered

So yes , i am not the same as someone who does not do those

Hygene is a form of politness and its easier for yourself and comfort of others

A sizeable population in iran and elsewhere do not do that.

Im not judging . Im stating my opinion and what u believe is fact. So we cant criticize people for their behaviour ? Some iranians car for hygene , so they are at comfort and dont bother others. They have every right to appropriately and politely criticize those who dony
 

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Each human is different
Im not the same as all iranians

Do iranians drive bad ? Do many not care for hygene ? Do they not waste water ?

I drive between lines in iran or elsewhere , brush my teeth at least twice a day and care much for my hygene so i am always showered

So yes , i am not the same as someone who does not do those

Hygene is a form of politness and its easier for yourself and comfort of others

A sizeable population in iran and elsewhere do not do that.

Im not judging . Im stating my opinion and what u believe is fact. So we cant criticize people for their behaviour ? Some iranians car for hygene , so they are at comfort and dont bother others. They have every right to appropriately and politely criticize those who dony
How do you do to drive between line during rush hours/traffic in Tehran?
 

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At one point driving inbetween lines and stopping behind red lights was impossible, this was in the mid 2000s, but i did not drive back then. When i started driving , i realized that overtime people drive better, especially when there is less traffic . Last time i drove in tehran was over a year and a half ago, but even in traffic , especially if your are on tje left lanes , you can push to stay in the line and usually behind you they will follow. Its much better now , even as a primary user or transport and pedestrian paths, traffic is worse now but driving is better , on highways almost everyone tries to at least be in the lines 60% of the time

About red lights, i always stop. Most people in tehran do anyways. I think peoper street design and intersections and lighting influences the way people drive alot , sadly we see very poor effort on that behalf. Worst places are still large squares like enghelab
 

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Rouhani Outlines Plan to Tackle Air Pollution by Fleet Renewal

"The president says the new plan is expected to help renovate the road fleet and remove old, polluting, and high fuel consuming heavy vehicles from the roads in three to four years"

"If the public transportation fleet in our country has the necessary resources to offer acceptable services, we can impose restrictions on traffic instead of shutting schools"




P resident Hassan Rouhani outlined a plan on Monday to replace old vehicles in a bid to reduce air pollution and fuel consumption.

Those who give their worn-out vehicles to be replaced would initially have to pay part of the vehicle's price, with the rest being paid off in installments and through other incentive programs, Rouhani told a meeting on the renovation of the transport fleet, his official website reported.

Replacement of urban vehicles, particularly the older ones, is a priority, he noted, adding that the implementation of the plan requires joint efforts by various organizations such as the Ministry of Roads and Urban Development, the Ministry of Industries, Mining, and Trade as well as the Ministry of Petroleum.

Modernizing the aging road fleet is the first step toward saving the environment, the president said.

According to him, the plan is expected to help renovate the country's road fleet and remove old, polluting, and high fuel consuming heavy vehicles from the roads in three to four years.

"As a result, fuel consumption will be considerably reduced, and the saved funds would basically be used for the execution of the plan," Rouhani said.

He added that about 5.5 million barrels of oil or its equivalent is consumed daily in the country and saving energy resources would lead to an increase in exports and foreign exchange earnings.

The president said low-quality fuel is to blame for part of the air pollution problem, adding that his administration is determined to continue taking the measures necessary to crack down on pollution and improve public health.

Public Transport

Rouhani also called for the development of the public transportation system, saying, "If the public transportation fleet in our country has the necessary resources to offer acceptable services, we can impose restrictions on traffic instead of shutting schools."

Closing schools and universities is one of the options that Iranian authorities resort to when the air pollution reaches alarming levels.

The president visited an exhibition held at the Tehran International Exhibition Center, featuring a number of auto manufacturers.

Domestic vehicle producers can contribute greatly to the implementation of the plan to renew the road fleet, he told reporters at the show.

Rouhani's administration has previously announced a series of measures to improve air quality, including decisions to replace a large number of dilapidated pickup trucks and urban buses and add new vehicles to expand the public transportation fleet.

The government has also been encouraging the manufacture of electric and hybrid cars and motorcycles and introduced a taxi renovation scheme in 2016, which entails sending the old cabs to the junkyard in exchange for a new vehicle.

https://financialtribune.com/articl...plan-to-tackle-air-pollution-by-fleet-renewal
 

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They need to be very ambitious :

- high budget for public transportation developpement : new BRT&metro lines, more wagons and buses

- replace ALL the buses with hybrid and electric buses. Ditto for the taxis.

- new cars sold should be at least Euro 5 (instead of Euro 4) and soon Euro 6.

- high pressure on Saipa/Ikco to stop their junk cars such as pride and so. Sanctions them with tariffs decrease on imported cars.

- Help for people wanting to replace their pride/405, even if this pride has only 1 year old.

- during pollution peak, most pollution cars (405, pride) should be banned.
 

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Trapped by Thousands of Old Clunkers Tehran Traffic Problems Persist

T he workgroup to help reduce Tehran’s air pollution met at the weekend and came up with some unsettling numbers. For instance, it said 2,529 old and dilapidated cars built three decades ago ply the overcrowded roads of the capital everyday doing a terrible job in contributing to the worsening air pollution.

During the meeting, a representative from Tehran Municipality delivered a report drawing attention to the status of clunkers in the sprawling capital which has expanded in all four directions over the past half century.

According to the Tehran Governorate website, currently, 2,529 cars over 30 years old and 3,200 dilapidated buses use the capital’s permanently clogged roads.

With thousands of premature pollution-related deaths every year, Iran is among the top five countries in terms of air pollution mortality. The latest statistics from Ministry of Health indicate that during the previous fiscal that ended in March 2017, close to 12,798 pollution-related deaths were recorded in the country with one-third of the number occurring in Tehran.

Majid Nasrollahnejad, head of Tehran Provincial Department of Road Maintenance and Transportation says dilapidated vehicles are one of the prime sources of air pollution and the toxic air.

“There are 2,400 vehicles over 50 years old across the country which must be removed from the roads.” He said these old and ageing vehicles will be banned in Tehran from March.

Dilapidated cars and buses are not alone in poisoning Tehran’s air. Motorcycles, which have often been criticized for being a nuisance, also contribute to the toxic air that for years has closed down schools and offices at irregular intervals and filled hospital beds.

Some 2.5 million carburetor-equipped motorcycles ply Tehran’s roads making a bad situation worse for both commuters and pedestrians. Since they are not equipped with catalyst converters and release toxic fumes directly into the environment, the amount of fumes each of the motorbike spews into the air equals that of eight vehicles with Euro 3 emission standards. The added problem is that the two-wheelers are fuel-intensive.

As if this was not enough, the outdated motorbikes are the number one culprits in creating noise pollution. It is estimated that in Tehran, motorbikes have a 25% contribution to air pollution and cause almost half of the noise pollution in and around the megacity of 12 million people.

>Renovation Scheme

After officials realized closing schools on unhealthy days was not be enough to tackle air pollution, new measures have been proposed, including a renovation scheme.

One calls for dilapidated and polluting cars and those lacking the mandatory technical inspection certificates to be banned from entering Tehran. However, such regulations are yet to be implemented meaningfully. Moreover, while air pollution was restricted to Tehran up until the recent past, today most major cities are grappling with the suffocation while nothing strong and effective has been done by those in charge to alleviate the problem.

In a bid to curb air pollution in cities, the government in collaboration with local banks and carmakers introduced a taxi renovation scheme in 2016 it calls ‘Nosazi’ meaning renovation.

The plan (retiring old taxis to the junkyard in exchange for a new vehicle) has been successful to some extent but many taxi drivers say they cannot afford the new cars despite the bank loan.

Furthermore, the cars delivered through the scheme are limited to few models produced by local carmakers which have often been censured for blatantly flouting even the minimum standards, disregarding safety rules, poor mileage and injecting poison into the air – a disturbing paradox because the new vehicles are supposed to be environmentally-friendly.

>Clogged Roads

Tehran Municipality estimates that 19 million daily trips are made in the capital on any working day. It is often said that the metropolis lacks enough and efficient public transport and cannot handle the heavy load to which there is no end in sight.

For all practical purposes, Tehran has become one big parking lot and things are expected to get much worse before they get better. More than four million vehicles commute on Tehran’s roads, a figure that according to a former traffic deputy at Tehran Municipality is eight times over and above nominal capacity.

“Tehran roads and freeways can hardly handle more than 750,000 vehicles. This is while, every day more than four million cars ply the clogged roads,” ISNA quoted Maziar Hosseini as saying.

True, many freeways, flyovers and underpasses have been built since the early 1990s and the subway system has expanded to many parts of Tehran. But as those in charge of urban management concur, all this is good but not enough.

Tehran Metro in its latest report said 3.8 million commuters use the subway on a daily basis which is about 20% of the 19 million trips conducted in the city.

Tehran Mayor Mohammad Ali Najafi who, due to his blunt criticism of incompetence and negligence of former and current policymakers, has earned public respect, says that improving the conditions will take time and in short, there is no magic wand for ending the air pollution and traffic dilemma.

Residents are looking up to Najafi and his men to see whether he can turn things around and offer them some succor as mismanagement, corruption and nepotism has done colossal, and possibly irreversible, harm to the once green and appealing city that became Iran’s capital more than two centuries ago.

https://financialtribune.com/articl...-old-clunkers-tehran-traffic-problems-persist
 

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Should of built the Monorail..

How about double deck highway?

extend maybe another 1-2 lines of metro.

what about move some head quarters to other cities, so Tehran won't have everything.

Maybe have Isfahan as our 2nd capital?
 
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