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L O S A N G E L E S
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Go ahead and create the 14 or so boroughs that you were talking about a few years ago, instead of splitting up even furthur. :cheers:
 

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Silver Lake
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5,451 Posts
Yes, you are mostly right "volsung", but their still exists a very strong sense of identity for Brooklyn kinda like the Valley. People still write Brooklyn, NY when mailing letters. What seems to be obviously different is that the Valley seems to disdain everything over the hill when the Valley is just a piece of shit.
 

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The Place
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1,137 Posts
^ Klamedia... Don't pay attention to her she is a troll from Colombia... resentful towards anything the US represents, talks crap about Los Angeles in some of the Latinscrapers and Spanish(from Spain) forums... check her posts and you'll see. In her eyes the third world is a perfect example of urbanism :nuts::weird:
 

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Shaken, never Stirred
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When I've lived in the San Fernando Valley, I always used Los Angeles, CA. 91607 instead of Valley Village and still got my mail. You see it's good to live in the City limits...
 

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Smile!
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609 Posts
^ Klamedia... Don't pay attention to her she is a troll from Colombia... resentful towards anything the US represents, talks crap about Los Angeles in some of the Latinscrapers and Spanish(from Spain) forums... check her posts and you'll see. In her eyes the third world is a perfect example of urbanism :nuts::weird:
Yeah you should see her anti-American rant in the thread "is North America is a failure" thread she started in the citytalk urban issues forum.
 

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Smile!
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When I've lived in the San Fernando Valley, I always used Los Angeles, CA. 91607 instead of Valley Village and still got my mail. You see it's good to live in the City limits...
Yeah L.A. is the only city to do that. Everywhere in L.A. including the Valley should get mail that says "Los Angeles, Cailfornia" NOT "Van Nuys, CA", or "North Hollywood, CA", Feels like your not part of L.A. when you really are.
 

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Yeah L.A. is the only city to do that. Everywhere in L.A. including the Valley should get mail that says "Los Angeles, Cailfornia" NOT "Van Nuys, CA", or "North Hollywood, CA", Feels like your not part of L.A. when you really are.
If you mean LA is the only city in America to do that, they you are wrong...

I do agree about making everyone use Los Angeles, CA has their mailing address. It would make the area much more unified (towards LA) and not feel so separate.
 

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The Place
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1,137 Posts
Yeah L.A. is the only city to do that. Everywhere in L.A. including the Valley should get mail that says "Los Angeles, Cailfornia" NOT "Van Nuys, CA", or "North Hollywood, CA", Feels like your not part of L.A. when you really are.

yeah... I remember this guy that lived in Silver Lake and used to write his mail address as "Silver Lake, CA":eek:hno:
 

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The Valley is interesting because I think when most outsiders thing about Los Angeles they are really thinking about "the Valley." But I'm not sure how many tourists would actually go to Valley if they come to LA.
 

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Silver Lake
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5,451 Posts
I think most outsiders are thinking of the beach and Hollywood......at least I was.....all inspired by LL's video "Going Back To Cali".
 

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The Valley is interesting because I think when most outsiders thing about Los Angeles they are really thinking about "the Valley." But I'm not sure how many tourists would actually go to Valley if they come to LA.
Universal, of course.

other than that, I'd say looking down from Mullholland is probably as close as we tourists get. of course, the view is damned worth it (and in all actuality, it offers far more of a peek than the southward view towards the basin).
 

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Yes, you are mostly right "volsung", but their still exists a very strong sense of identity for Brooklyn kinda like the Valley. People still write Brooklyn, NY when mailing letters. What seems to be obviously different is that the Valley seems to disdain everything over the hill when the Valley is just a piece of shit.
and I believe that in Queens, the situation is more like what has been described in LA for the valley, basin communities like Hollywood, and harbor ones like San Pedro: the local community (almost like a village) is its own address (Flushing, Jackson Hts., etc.) same for Staten Island, I believe. Unless I'm mistaken, I think only Manhattan and the Bronx have NYC addresses.
 

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I don't want to be presumptous here with an observation about LA from a person who doesn't live there and who doesn't know it like you Angelenos do, but I would like to share my opinion here:

New York and Los Angeles are fundamentally different from all other US cities. Before I go on, let me say I'm not talking about by what they both have to offer (which admittedly is extensive) or about the unquestioned power of their economies or their high degree of influence on the US.

No, I'm talking about structure.

Due to their sizes and their topography and geography, NY and LA are each so large and so complex that their cores and their peripheries may seem, at times, like totally different worlds.

While other cities can have fringe neighborhoods that have a suburban feel to them, only NY and LA are big enough so that these fringe areas are often more town or village-like rather than city neighborhood. Some of these areas function like a town in all ways other than having a municipal status and function.

In New York, Manhattan is set off from the other four boroughs by rivers and all five boroughs spread out on four different land masses. The far reaches of Queens are much more like neighboring Long Island independent communities than Manhattan. Staten Island is even more remote and, in some respects, has less of a NYC feel than the Jersey areas across the Hudson from Manhattan.

Water doesn't divide LA, but the Hollywood Hills certainly do. The Basin is LA's Manhattan and the valley is another world north of the hills. The narrow basin/harbor link creates another sense of being apart to the south.

I'd say for years LA struggled in getting message across to America that though its urbanization was different from all other US cities, it was just as valid form of urbanization and had its own great offerings. Which would be correct. That the paradigm so many Americans had for cities didn't fit LA was their problem, not LA's.

Seems to me there is another paradigm and one I believe holds a great deal of validity about LA and NY as well: their sizes and geographical diversity have spawned a concept of "city" unlike any others in the nation where the city does not form into the role of having a downtown and neighborhoods extending outward from it all having a direct relationship to that core area. LA and NY instead, are America's city/states......offering their citizens so many possible options in a setting where neighborhoods can become more of their own world and where the glue that holds other cities together isn't as thick....without hurting functionality.
 

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Silver Lake
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What a great observation, as always "edsg". When comparing other northeast coast cities and their sq miles NYC is mammoth in size. Boston, Baltimore are both under 100 sq miles while even Phili is just a nudge above 100, then you have NYC which sprawls over 300! Many people on this board don't seem to realize how vast NYC is, they only seem to concentrate on Manhattan. And by todays standards the city of LA would only be at most a medium-sized city up against unbelievably large municipalities like Mexico City and Sao Paulo.
 

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The Place
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1,137 Posts
Seems to me there is another paradigm and one I believe holds a great deal of validity about LA and NY as well: their sizes and geographical diversity have spawned a concept of "city" unlike any others in the nation where the city does not form into the role of having a downtown and neighborhoods extending outward from it all having a direct relationship to that core area. LA and NY instead, are America's city/states......offering their citizens so many possible options in a setting where neighborhoods can become more of their own world and where the glue that holds other cities together isn't as thick....without hurting functionality.
I really believe this is more of an LA thing than any other city... LA is considered the paradigm for this type of urbanism.
 

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Seems to me there is another paradigm and one I believe holds a great deal of validity about LA and NY as well: their sizes and geographical diversity have spawned a concept of "city" unlike any others in the nation where the city does not form into the role of having a downtown and neighborhoods extending outward from it all having a direct relationship to that core area. LA and NY instead, are America's city/states......offering their citizens so many possible options in a setting where neighborhoods can become more of their own world and where the glue that holds other cities together isn't as thick....without hurting functionality.
I agree. The way I see it, LA has relatively few suburbs that function the same way as other suburbs in American cities. In most cities, you have a core, central business district where the greatest proportion of jobs are and then radiating out from there are the city neighborhoods. Beyond the borders of the city, you have the suburbs, which do not fall under the city government, yet depend on the city for the jobs. In many of these metro areas, the suburbs have a larger population than the city itself.

I don't see LA as functioning this way. Where is the vast land of suburbia, separate from the city, fresh with new subdivisions, similar to what is seen in Chicagoland or Northern Virginia? You could say that the SFV serves this function, but most of the Valley falls under the LA city govt. It may be suburban in appearance, but it's technically still a part of the city. Santa Monica, Beverly Hills, Pasadena, Burbank, Glendale, etc. are really separate cities and are much more urban than the typical American suburb. They also each have their own downtowns, attracting numerous jobs.

Places like Santa Clarita, Simi Valley, Agoura Hills, and Thousand Oaks are more similar to the typical suburbs that you now find across America...however compared to the massive population of LA, the population and land area of these places seems relatively small.

So I have to ask. Does LA have any suburbs that function in the way that most American suburbs do? Am I even making sense?
 

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The Place
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1,137 Posts
I agree. The way I see it, LA has relatively few suburbs that function the same way as other suburbs in American cities. In most cities, you have a core, central business district where the greatest proportion of jobs are and then radiating out from there are the city neighborhoods. Beyond the borders of the city, you have the suburbs, which do not fall under the city government, yet depend on the city for the jobs. In many of these metro areas, the suburbs have a larger population than the city itself.

I don't see LA as functioning this way. Where is the vast land of suburbia, separate from the city, fresh with new subdivisions, similar to what is seen in Chicagoland or Northern Virginia? You could say that the SFV serves this function, but most of the Valley falls under the LA city govt. It may be suburban in appearance, but it's technically still a part of the city. Santa Monica, Beverly Hills, Pasadena, Burbank, Glendale, etc. are really separate cities and are much more urban than the typical American suburb. They also each have their own downtowns, attracting numerous jobs.

Places like Santa Clarita, Simi Valley, Agoura Hills, and Thousand Oaks are more similar to the typical suburbs that you now find across America...however compared to the massive population of LA, the population and land area of these places seems relatively small.

So I have to ask. Does LA have any suburbs that function in the way that most American suburbs do? Am I even making sense?

I think you already answered your own question...
 

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When you think about San Jose having more people than SF, people should get the point being made here. When traveling to that area, people still say that they are visiting SF or the "Bay Area", not San Jose, right? West Coast cities simply operate differently, and LA is like no other place and takes this concept to a whole other level. This is why people around the globe know us and want to visit us, so we should be happy about that.
 
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