SkyscraperCity banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
971 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Took some pics on my trip back up to Jax this weekend. Downtown was dead when I took these pics on Sunday morning. The weather makes it look even worse, but Jacksonville is probably my favorite downtown in all of Florida because of the character of the buildings. My sister once said, "architecturally, it's the closes thing Florida has to Manhattan."

I only got pics of immediate downtown in the Central Business district, so these pics don't even begin to do the massiveness and diversity of Jax's downtown justice. So think of it as just a taste:











Bank of America, tallest in Florida outside of Miami:




















My favorite building in Jacksonville, I don't know why:




























Mōdis building, one of the few nice skyscrapers to be built in the '70s


























They finally started really developing the other side of the river, and it's looking nice:








We left town on this:

Just kidding :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,280 Posts
Florida cities are really not my thing. Currently I live in downtown Fort Lauderdale which is more happening than this. My favorite city is obviously Miami. Florida heat is as oppressive as cold northern Winters thus the lack of pedestrian activity.

Jax has some interesting buildings. Florida needs some serious light rail in its cities. I hate the car dependency and strip malls along with terrible architecture and towers in the park.
 

·
Goddess of Winter
Joined
·
2,537 Posts
Florida cities are really not my thing. Currently I live in downtown Fort Lauderdale which is more happening than this. My favorite city is obviously Miami. Florida heat is as oppressive as cold northern Winters thus the lack of pedestrian activity.

Jax has some interesting buildings. Florida needs some serious light rail in its cities. I hate the car dependency and strip malls along with terrible architecture and towers in the park.
Agreed 100% (from someone living here). Miami is crying out for huge investment in mass transit (rail). The Miami metro area (incl. Fort Lauderdale) has over 5 million people, only to be served by 1 Tri-Rail and 1 Metrorail line. South Florida is even more car dependent than Los Angeles IMO. Florida cities also lack parks and recreational areas too.

I like the climate though, although you learn to appreciate it more during the winter, when the daytime temperature hovers around 78 and it's cool and breezy at night.

Funnily enough though, I'm looking into Philly as a possible relocation place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
971 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Florida cities are really not my thing. Currently I live in downtown Fort Lauderdale which is more happening than this. My favorite city is obviously Miami. Florida heat is as oppressive as cold northern Winters thus the lack of pedestrian activity.

Jax has some interesting buildings. Florida needs some serious light rail in its cities. I hate the car dependency and strip malls along with terrible architecture and towers in the park.
Yeah, Fort Lauderdale is WAY more happening, even if I did take these pics "during church time." It's just night and day between south and north Florida. Miami is quite car dependent if you don't live in a pedestrian-friendly area, but I do like how active and pedestrian Miami is.

Jax does have a light rail system but it is about as sad as the one in Miami. It literally takes you from one end of downtown to the other and the cars are so small it almost looks like an amusement park ride, lol. I couldn't bring myself to take pictures of it.

I agree about the whole oppressive summer heat thing. In the winter you see people in Florida eating outside, going to parks, walking everywhere, and enjoying nature. During the summer everyone just seems to hole themselves up in their air-conditioned houses and offices and just drive everywhere and I don't blame them. Unless the whole state of Florida can actively fund light rail in its major cities major and minor roads are just going to be horrendous and tourism will severely suffer given the constant population boom all over the state.
 

·
Registered
meow
Joined
·
6,334 Posts
Well the city's not bad, but it does look a bit dead heheh. Summers in subtropical areas are quite constraining. Over here it's quite pleasant to eat out or go for a walk in the winter, but in the summer I'd never do that heheh! :D

Couldn't it be also that everyone dunno, went to the beaches and stuff like that? :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Cool pics...I enjoy Jacksonville's riverfront promenade etc.

However, I really don't understand these comments:

"architecturally, it's the closes thing Florida has to Manhattan."

"I only got pics of immediate downtown in the Central Business district, so these pics don't even begin to do the massiveness and diversity of Jax's downtown justice."

There is nothing massive about Jacksonville's downtown. No density, no diversity, sterile, and no height. Have you ever been to NYC, Chicago, Toronto, London UK etc? Those are cities with more "massive" and diverse CBDs / inner city neighbourhoods.
 

·
Premium member
Joined
·
7,694 Posts
Wow, didn't expect this. Looks very nice and urban. But why so few people on the streets?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
971 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
There is nothing massive about Jacksonville's downtown. No density, no diversity, sterile, and no height. Have you ever been to NYC, Chicago, Toronto, London UK etc? Those are cities with more "massive" and diverse CBDs / inner city neighbourhoods.
Well first of all of course Jacksonville does not have the height that NYC and Chicago and Toronto...you're comparing it to cities 20 times the size of Jacksonville. However, Florida is the skyscraper capital of the U.S. (we have more here than any other state), and Jacksonville is the 3rd tallest, so to Florida, and to most of the U.S. for that matter, Jacksonville does have height.

Also, when I compared it to Manhattan I was speaking of the density (if you've ever been to another Florida city, you'll know what I mean when I say density) and the art deco architecture. Also the fact that many of the buildings historically were built around the same time as those in Manhattan.

Also, Jax does have a lot of diverse and interesting inner city neighborhoods: northside, springfield (a whole victorian town just outside of downtown), riverside (almost a 2nd downtown), south river, avondale, and San Marco. Also if you want to use the term "massiveness" look up which city in the U.S. is the largest in terms of area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
241 Posts
if it wasn't for the overall good condition of the buildings, i could have sworn that this is that city in Resident Evil, after the virus went loose! Jesus, is that city inhabited by more than 10 people (aprox the number of dudes and dudetes in the photos above), or is it deserted or something?! I understand the heat and everything, church (Is Florida in the Bible Belt, I don't know?), soccer moms and MILF Hunters on the hunt, and even people working, but for whom if nobody's arround? I live in Bucharest, Romania! This country will be able to support the production of bananas and kiwi's in no time because of global warming and it's effects (in fact, the aclimatization of these tropical fruits began many years ago in some research institutes, so it's a fact). We've had temperatures of over 40 degrees C this summer, and mo fo's got out the house man, old farts and fartresses roaming the streets in that heat, passing out in the street and on the buses, but they went out! I've seen several threads on SSC, showing similar american cities, also deserted and scary as poop! Please explain if you have the knowledge to do so!
 

·
Civilization
Joined
·
2,713 Posts
Jacksonville looks really nice, much better than Miami from what I've seen.

Although I don't really like the condo tower look and palm trees. It just reminds me of a tacky resort city and not a real 'cosmopolitan' city.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
971 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
We've had temperatures of over 40 degrees C this summer, and mo fo's got out the house man, old farts and fartresses roaming the streets in that heat, passing out in the street and on the buses, but they went out! I've seen several threads on SSC, showing similar american cities, also deserted and scary as poop! Please explain if you have the knowledge to do so!
I wish I had a good answer...you people in Europe and Asia and South America just like to get out of the house way more, what can I say? North Americans typically like to get out of the house and into a car and to a shopping mall or a Super-WalMart and then back home. And when they do go out for walks it is around the fake retention pond in their planned suburban communities for a good 30-minutes until it gets too dark and they get scared and they walk back inside their house and set their security alarm (and I'm not talking about you guys in San Francisco, Chicago, DC, and New York).

That's not even my lifestyle, but sadly it is the lifestyle of so many Americans and that's why many downtowns are dying out...or in the case of Jacksonville, died out and are trying to be reborn. Just the way it is :eek:hno:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Well first of all of course Jacksonville does not have the height that NYC and Chicago and Toronto...you're comparing it to cities 20 times the size of Jacksonville. However, Florida is the skyscraper capital of the U.S. (we have more here than any other state), and Jacksonville is the 3rd tallest, so to Florida, and to most of the U.S. for that matter, Jacksonville does have height.

Also, when I compared it to Manhattan I was speaking of the density (if you've ever been to another Florida city, you'll know what I mean when I say density) and the art deco architecture. Also the fact that many of the buildings historically were built around the same time as those in Manhattan.

Also if you want to use the term "massiveness" look up which city in the U.S. is the largest in terms of area.
I guess it's all in how the city is zoned. Jacksonville has amalgamated all suburban growth into Jacksonville proper/Duval county...where as a city like Atlanta expands into an area zoned as Decatur or San Diego into Chula Vista. That being said, I suppose the thing that is impressive is that city council can govern such a large area that would otherwise be governed by suburb cities.

I suppose the density is greater than other cities in Florida, however, that doesn't say much...cities in Florida couldn't be more sparse. It's true for most southern cities due to how new so much of the construction is, and how urban planners or lack there of, laid out the city. Houston is congested and has a lot of skyscrapers, but it is still not very dense either.

Generally, there is more available and affordable land in the south for development, so why create density...
It's one of the reasons I didn't enjoy living in Charlotte, North Carolina. How can you have a sense of community with vibrant outdoor living and culture when everything is so spread out...that and it's often quite hot to be outdoors. Maybe it's just the European coming out in me...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
971 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Generally, there is more available and affordable land in the south for development, so why create density...
It's one of the reasons I didn't enjoy living in Charlotte, North Carolina. How can you have a sense of community with vibrant outdoor living and culture when everything is so spread out...that and it's often quite hot to be outdoors. Maybe it's just the European coming out in me...
I think you hit the nail on the head. That is also why newer cities such as Orlando and Tampa are marked as "having no culture." how can a city have it's own culture (like Atlanta, Philly, Baltimore, NYC) when there is no cohesiveness and everyone sticks to their own end of town? All of the new neighborhoods here in Orlando now have their own "downtowns" with a grocery store and shopping, and their own 4th of July parties, and all these things that used to bring people from opposite ends of town together, and it's convenient, but it polarizes people and further fuels the suburbanism.
 

·
Love me, love my dog...
Joined
·
3,075 Posts
Nice shots of Jax...as I'm watching Florida State vs. Colorado at Jacksonville Municipal Stadium. :)


if it wasn't for the overall good condition of the buildings, i could have sworn that this is that city in Resident Evil, after the virus went loose! Jesus, is that city inhabited by more than 10 people (aprox the number of dudes and dudetes in the photos above), or is it deserted or something?! I understand the heat and everything, church (Is Florida in the Bible Belt, I don't know?), soccer moms and MILF Hunters on the hunt, and even people working, but for whom if nobody's arround? I live in Bucharest, Romania! This country will be able to support the production of bananas and kiwi's in no time because of global warming and it's effects (in fact, the aclimatization of these tropical fruits began many years ago in some research institutes, so it's a fact). We've had temperatures of over 40 degrees C this summer, and mo fo's got out the house man, old farts and fartresses roaming the streets in that heat, passing out in the street and on the buses, but they went out! I've seen several threads on SSC, showing similar american cities, also deserted and scary as poop! Please explain if you have the knowledge to do so!

People! He said the photos were taken on SUNDAY MORNING. People sleep late, go to church, relax/read the newspaper, etc. on SUNDAY MORNING. Most cities that I've experienced are quiet or at least quietER on Sundays, especially during the morning hours. Folks usually have to go to work or some other obligation every other day of the week.

The photos seem to be purposefully taken of the buildings and architecture of the city. Do we need to see anonymous strangers as proof that people actually live there? I don't - obviously the city is inhabited.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top