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If, after, the introduction of the monorail and MRT there is no interchangable 'smart' card system between all BRT, monorail and MRT it will be silly! Multi-modal transport systems, especially those with different operators, only work effectively with ease of interchangability and the option of universal ticketing.

So hopefully all the operators realise this and the city council ensures it happens to help get encourage more people to use public transport.
 

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tata said:
Jakarta to subsidize construction of 15 busway lines in Jakarta in attempt to speed-up the realization of those lines.
Thanks for posting this Tata.

This is good news and shows that, current problems with Mono-rail aside, there is some confidence in expanding new public transport. Will be interesting to see how many more passengers use the system from Oct after the two new lines start providing E-W coverage.
 

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Alvin said:
yep, as far as I know corridors 2 and 3 will be completed by the end of the year
Corridors 4,5,6 and 7 will start preliminery work this year. The govt has an ambitious plan to finish these 4 lines by 2007.
Alvin, thansk for the info. If lines 2 & 3 are finhsed by the end of this year, and at least two lines of 4-7 by early 2007, then this will be a significant achievment. Passenger numbers should greatly increase once there is a basic network beyond the first 3 lines.
 

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Adelaides O-Bahn busway

tata said:
it looks to me that rail used in Adelaide busway would cost a lot. Why not building light train in that case?
tata, actually a rail line was considered but a mixture of cost benefits, environmental issues (part of the line uses a creek corridor) and politics (new mass transit system for small Australia city - well smaller than others with 1 million people) meant that the O-Bahn system was chosen.

In the end it has work out very well. There is a website for further info.

There are some interesting facts on the website ;

- At 12 kilometres long, the Adelaide O-Bahn is the longest and fastest guided bus service in the world, travelling at speeds up to 100km/h.
- More than 7 million passengers a year, including local, interstate and overseas visitors use the O-Bahn. The system is capable of moving 18,000 people an hour in each direction.
- The busway consists of 5,800 sleepers, 5,600 pylons drilled to a depth of 3 metres, 4,200 track pieces, 25 bridges, 8 pedestrian overpasses and a 60 metre-long tunnel.
- Compared with equivalent rail systems, the O-Bahn is almost 50 per cent cheaper to operate while providing a faster, more flexible service than many other transit systems.
- At the time of building, the entire O-Bahn project, (including the bus fleet) cost $98 million.
 

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Great to see that people prefer the BRT, so they should given the difference in service. I am not sure how the new lines will open and be able to run effcetively with only the 30 'reserve' buses from line 1, especially given the stated need of 204 buses!, but I guess at least that it means it opens by the end of the year.
Yes, good on Sutiyoso for ensuring that CNG will be the fuel.
Any recent photos of line 2 and 3
 

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tata said:
Summary:
- Line 2 and 3 operation on Jan 15, 2006 (2 years after line 1)
- Line 2: 80% ready and Line 3: 70% ('till date)
- Both line will use in total 27 buses out of which 12 are new CNG buses and 15 petrol buses from line 1.
- Passangers can use the 3 lines with only 1 ticket.
Expected finish date for trials is 15 Dec but that looks unlikely especially if line 3 is only 70% done.

The one ticket model is great.
 

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Good to see photos on the site of the the test run the other day even if there is obviously still a lot of work to complete and that the lines will not be fully operational until April 06. It will be interesting to see how many more pax (than the 70,000 per day for line I) start using the network once both lines are operational

Regarding construction of the four new lines does anyone know when it is due to commence? Will they all be constructed at once? What are the numbers of the lines again?...I was looking for that map that was posted earlier but could not find it.

2005: Tough year for motorists and commuters alike
City News - December 26, 2005 Bambang Nurbianto, The Jakarta Post, Jakarta


Throughout 2005, the passage of motorists and commuters on many of Jakarta's streets has often been disrupted by transportation projects that only worsen traffic congestion. Those traveling from Pulogadung bus terminal in East Jakarta to Kalideres in West Jakarta, for example, are obviously frustrated by the construction of busway corridor II from Pulogadung to Harmoni in Central Jakarta and corridor III from Harmoni to Kalideres.

Travelers from Lebak Bulus or Pondok Indah in South Jakarta to Senayan or Palmerah in Central Jakarta have to deal with traffic congestion created by the construction of the Kebayoran Lama underpass. Even the monorail project has been a headache for commuters in the capital. PT Jakarta Monorail, which was awarded the project, has started construction on Jl. Casablanca and Jl. Rasuna Said in South Jakarta and Jl. Asia Afrika in Central Jakarta. Very often, construction work worsens traffic jam in the areas.

All of this construction is aimed at improving the flow of traffic and creating a comfortable and convenient transportation system in the capital. If past experience serves as a guide, one can say that the such projects may not always resolve the city's notorious traffic jams. A case in point is the Pondok Indah underpass. The project was undertaken to ease traffic bottlenecks at a busy intersection in Pondok Indah, but congestion remains even though the underpass is already in use.

Head of Jakarta Transportation Agency Nurachman admitted that there was no significant improvement in the transportation sector this year as many of projects were long-term projects. "We should be patient because it takes time to resolve transportation problems. We hope that things will be better next year as several projects are expected to be completed, including busway corridors II and III," said Nurachman recently. Transportation experts have long advised the city to develop a mass rapid transit system that includes a subway, railways, monorails and a busway in order to resolve chronic traffic congestion in the capital.

Transportation experts argue that a mass rapid transit system not only provides better service to urban travelers but is also more environmentally friendly. The presence of comfortable, reliable, affordable and safe MRTs, they argue, is expected to encourage private car users, who are dominating Jakarta's streets, to shift to public transportation. Keeping private cars off the streets would ease traffic jams and reduce air pollution in the capital, which is the World's third most polluted city after Mexico City and Bangkok.

According to environmentalists, 70 percent of air pollution in the capital is due to vehicular emissions. The number of private vehicles running in the capital has reached around four million, while the number of public transportation vehicles is less than 100,000.

The city administration has actually drawn up several public transportation projects aimed at resolving traffic congestion in the capital. These include busway or bus rapid transit (BRT), subway, commuter train and monorail.
It seems, however, the city administration is focusing its attention on the development of busway corridors. Currently, the city only operates 75 buses along the 12.9-kilometer corridor of the first BRT from Blok M to Kota.
The buses are considered to have met the minimal standards of public transportation, that is they are secure, safe, reliable, affordable and comfortable for passengers.

Governor Sutiyoso, who seems to be bent on being crowned as Jakarta's father of transportation, has said that the city would go ahead with its public transportation projects, particularly its busway program. He asserted that his busway project was a success in terms of providing commuters with better public transportation. "We are on the right tract. I believe that our busway project is the solution to the transportation problems, But we must be patient," said the governor recently.

Sutiyoso's seriousness in the development of the busway project was seen in the increase in the budget allocations for the project. The city allocated some Rp 140 billion (US$14 million) in 2004 as compared to Rp 510 billion in 2005, and he has proposed Rp 876.70 billion for the four busway corridor projects in 2006. The four will be from Pulogadung to Hotel Indonesia in Central Jakarta, from Kampung Melayu in East Jakarta to Ancol in North Jakarta, from Ragunan in South Jakarta to Jl. Imam Bonjol in Central Jakarta and from Kampung Rambutan in East Jakarta to Kampung Melayu.

Data from busway management BP TransJakarta showed that when busway corridor I was launched in early 2004, it only took some 20,000 passengers each day. Now, there are over 70,000 travelers using the busway every day.
 

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tata said:
Yappo,

There are 2 maps available, the first one is the original plan taken from http://trans.jakarta.go.id . The second one is created by an Indonesian forumer peseq5.
I'm not sure though if the actual construction going on is following the original plan (I'm not joking).

Still from http://trans.jakarta.go.id, 4 lines are to be build in 2006 whose budget is already proposed to the parliament. It's said that these 4 lines will be operational by the end of 2006 which looks very much optimistic.

Line 4: Pulo Gadung - Bundaran Hotel Indonesia
See the 2nd map, this line connects B1 and A11. I'm pretty much sure that this line will pass Jl Pemuda, Jl Pramuka, passing in front of Saint Caroles Hospital, RSCM, Megaria, connection with Jabotabek line (Cikini Station), Jl Diponegoro, Jl Imam Bonjol and arriving in Bunderan HI for connection with Line 1.

When this line is realized it'll be easy to travel from the south to the east of Jakarta. Will see a lot of passengers.
However they may face difficulties to find an area to allow the buses to make U-Turn in Bunderan HI, there's no enough space there.

Line 5: Kampung Melayu - Ancol
Starts from BL1 go up north crossing Line 4 and Line 2. So we will see the integration with those 2 lines plus the possibility corresponding with Jabotabek railway somewhere on the north.

This line I predict will pass, Jatinegara Market, Connection with Jabotabek railway in Jatinegara station. Then go to Matraman raya, connection with Line 4 around Saint Caroles area, go up north to Pasar Senen, and Jl Mangga Besar then arriving in Ancol.

Line 6: Kampung Rambutan - Kampung Melayu
As said in their website, this will be the most difficult line to build since the road in Jl. Dewi Sartika is narrow.

Predicted iteneries, start from Kp Rambutan, Jl. Raya Bogor, Cililitan, Jl Dewi Sartika, Cawang, Polonia and Kp Melayu (connected with Monorail Station).

Line 7: Ragunan-Imam Bonjol
Very promising line since this will connect residential area in the south of jakarta with CBD of Kuningan. The roads that it passes are quite wide so the success probability of having this line realized is quite high.

My guess is this line will start from Ragunan Zoo, Pejaten, Warung Buncit, Mampang Prapatan, Jl. Rasuna Said, connection with Monorail Line Blue in Mega Kuningan, and ends in Jl Imam Bonjol (connected with Line 4).

The only difficulty will be to find an area for the buses changing direction back to Ragunan in Jl Imam Bonjol since the road is quite narrow and this is a diplomatic area --it's not supposed to be a busy area.


As seen above, there are a lot of connection between the lines and with Jabotabek and future monorail.

For illustration, the 4 new lines would appear the the right bottom part of peseq5's map.
Hopefully this is useful.
Cheers,
tata
Note for peseq5: if you allow me I could add those 4 new lines into your map. Let me know.
Tata, thank you very much for your info and explanation of the 4 new lines. Now that you have peseq5 premission, and if you have the time, an updated map would be great. Looking at the Jakarta Posts articles from today and the one you posted on the 4th it doesn't seem as though there is an announced date for construction of the four new lines and given the potential backlash with traffic jams and rerouting of existing bus lines (from bus operators) I guess that they may be waiting until after April and once everything settles down before commencing nay new construction.

That would probably mean construction starting mid year. I notice that the article on the 4th still talks about 15 lines so it is good to see that there is a commitment to implement the full plan. Of course much can change between now and 2010 so perhaps we should not get our hopes to high. We'll wait to see the next four lines built first....
 

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So can someone pls update me on the completion dates for each line?

If I remember correct it was originally planned for all 4 lines to be finished by the end of the year but it seems certain that Line 5 will not meet that deadline.
 

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Alvin said:
well, it looks as if Lines 6-8 should open as scheduled, 15 January 2007. Line 5, I'm not too sure because of that problem...
Alvin, a belated thanks for replying to my query. peseg5 seems to think that Line 5 will also be completed on time but perhaps let's see how it is looking in a couple of months.

@Tata, Thanks for posting the line maps. Which site did they come from? Transjakarta?
 

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New bus fare rests on 'study, subsidy' - The Jakarta Post October 09, 2006

The Jakarta administration has said it will implement a new busway fare and system for all seven corridors, but both depend on a feasibility study and the funds available. "We have an independent team, which is coordinated by the Jakarta Public Works Agency, to minimize the current busway issue so we would gain more profit," said provincial secretary Ritola Tasmaya last week.

The independent team had already started working on the problem, he added. Ritola said at City Hall that the independent team would make recommendations based on their findings while the city administration would implement their suggestions. "An increase in fares will also depend on the subsidy of the busway system. The limit of the subsidy depends on the provincial financial capability," he said.

The amount of the busway subsidy depends on the amount money set aside for subsidies in other city sectors. "There is a trade-off for this. No public decision ever benefits everybody," Ritola said. An increase in one project would mean a decrease in others, Ritola said, adding that the Jakarta administration had missed some profit targets because it lacked sufficient experience.

The City Council Commission D overseeing infrastructure earlier said it would cut the busway's operational budget because it had met only half the annual profit target. "The number of passengers we had targeted was lower because we did not incorporate in changing the zones. About 20 to 30 percent of total passengers changed zones during trips," Ritola said.

He added that the city administration would minimize the number of operating buses in less busy hours to make it more efficient. Currently, many buses keep operating despite a low number of passengers. "However, our estimate could be off-target. There could be a sudden increase of passengers when we decrease the buses," he said. As for auditing the busway system for financial leakages, Ritola said that it would audit the busway systematically and not all at once. "If we audit it altogether then none of the busway employees can serve passengers," he said.
 

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Academic promotes fuel economy in public transportation system Jakarta Post - October 13, 2006 Adianto P. Simamora

As the transportation sector is the leading user of fuel, Jakarta needs to adopt an energy-saving transportation system in order to reduce energy-related emissions, an academic says. Under the proposed system, public buses are identified as the preferred transportation mode, however additional bus stops would need to be added in strategic locations to provide closer access to people's homes. "What is happening now is that residents are finding other alternatives, such as buying new cars and driving themselves to work," Efendy Tambunan from the Indonesian Christian University's School of Engineering told The Jakarta Post.

The owners of private cars and motorcycles are the main purchasers of fuel, he said. The average fuel consumption of a motorcycle is one liter per 40 kilometers. "While a 40-seat public bus consumes nine l of fuel per 40 km. So there must be strong political will from the administration to promote the use of public buses," he said. Efendy said the administration needed to put more money into improving the public transportation system, including upgrading roads and improving traffic policing to control the maximum rate of traffic. The age of a vehicle can be a measure of its fuel-efficiency. Efendy said private cars should be under the age of 10 years and buses under the age of eight.

He said the busway, which is expected to further increase commuter linkages next year when four new corridors begin operating, was a good starting point. "However, access to feeder buses must be improved to encourage the owners of private cars to take the busway." He said the administration needed to make its feeder buses as comfortable as those provided by some housing complexes for residents. Transportation Minister Hatta Radjasa said the transportation sector consumed about 31 million l of fuel (both solar and diesel) a year, or about 50 percent of the domestic demand. "The transportation sector contributes 70 percent of the city's air pollution but we can't stop producing cars because it (the auto industry) is the pride of the nation," he said during a discussion promoting bio-premium last week.

Data from the Energy and Mineral Resources Ministry's Directorate General of Oil and Natural Gas shows energy consumption in the transportation sector is not slowing down. In 2003, the transportation sector consumed 47 percent of domestic demand, up from 45 percent in 1994. Fossil-based energy use and production are major contributors to greenhouse gas emissions. There are more than 2.5 million private cars, 3.8 million motorcycles and 255,000 public transportation vehicles on city streets every day.

Many of the vehicles come from Jakarta's supporting cities of Bogor, Depok, Tangerang and Bekasi. Experts have been critical of the poorly planned development of Greater Jakarta, which has damaged the environment. The city administration is also planning to build a mass rapid transit system and has been promoting the use of environmentally friendly fuels like compressed natural gas.

Cars produce many types of pollutants including carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides. Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless, very toxic gas that can cause a range of ailments. A joint study by nonprofit groups Infrastructure Watch and Swisscontact has urged the administration to implement a sustainable transportation system by linking the city with Bogor, Depok, Tangerang and Bekasi.
 
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