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native dobrogean
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765 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Pictures i made in japan during my visits :

2002


the hotel by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



senso-ji 2002 by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



2006



japan 363 by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



japan 209 by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



japan 148 by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



japan 150 by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



traditional japanese table by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



monkey familly by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



teens in kimono by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



japan 430 by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



nakamise dori by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



japan 552 by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



white senso-ji by Alex Carbune, on Flickr
 

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native dobrogean
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765 Posts

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native dobrogean
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765 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
2006 :

Sensō-ji (金龍山浅草寺, Kinryū-zan Sensō-ji?) is an ancient Buddhist temple located in Asakusa, Taitō, Tokyo. It is Tokyo's oldest temple, and one of its most significant.


japan 622 by japoniamea, on Flickr


this school ( Asakusa Shogako ) was founded 130 years ( or so ) ago. on the roof it has swimming pool and tennis court.


japan 299 by japoniamea, on Flickr


This Dragon ( from Yokohama`s China Town ) was in place until 2008


japan 264 by japoniamea, on Flickr


2007


Shibuya is famous for its scramble crossing. It is located in front of the Shibuya Station Hachikō exit and stops vehicles in all directions to allow pedestrians to inundate the entire intersection. Three large TV screens mounted on nearby buildings overlook the crossing. The Starbucks store overlooking the crossing is also one of the busiest in the world.


DSC01654 by japoniamea, on Flickr


DSC01669 by japoniamea, on Flickr


The water bus ship named " Himiko " (after a Queen )


DSC01812 by japoniamea, on Flickr



The Great Buddha of Kamakura is a monumental outdoor bronze statue of Amitābha Buddha located at the Kōtoku-in Temple in Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. The bronze statue probably dates from 1252, in the Kamakura period, according to temple records. It was preceded by a giant wooden Buddha, which was completed in 1243 "after five years of continuous labor", the funds having been raised by Lady Inadano-Tsubone and the Buddhist priest Joukou of Toutoumi. That wooden statue was damaged by a storm in 1248, and the hall containing it was destroyed, so Joukou suggested making another statue of bronze, and the huge amount of money necessary for this and for a new hall was raised for the project. The sculptors were Ono Goroemaon and Tanji Hisatomo. At one time, the statue was gilded. There are still traces of gold leaf near the statue's ears. The hall was destroyed by a storm in 1334, was rebuilt, and was damaged by yet another storm in 1369, and was rebuilt yet again.

It is unclear, however, whether the statue constructed in 1252 is the same statue as the present statue. The building housing the statue was washed away in the tsunami of September 20th, 1498 during the Muromachi period.
The Great Buddha, Kamakura
Closeup with a dove for illustration of the actual size, Kamakura

The statue is approximately 13.35 meters tall and weighs approximately 93 tons. The statue is hollow, and visitors can view the interior. Many visitors over the years have left graffiti on the inside of the statue. At one time, there were thirty-two bronze lotus petals at the base of the statue, but only four remain, and they are no longer in place. A notice at the entrance to the grounds reads, "Stranger, whosoever thou art and whatsoever be thy creed, when thou enterest this sanctuary remember thou treadest upon ground hallowed by the worship of ages. This is the Temple of Bhudda (sic) and the gate of the eternal, and should therefore be entered with reverence."

Since the last hall was washed away in 1498, the Great Buddha has stood in the open air.

The Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923 destroyed the base the statue sits upon, but the base was repaired in 1925. Repairs to the statue were carried out in 1960-1961, when the neck was strengthened and measures were taken to protect it from earthquakes. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kamakura_Daibutsu



DSC01605 by japoniamea, on Flickr



DSC01595 by japoniamea, on Flickr


and this are Buddha`s slippers


DSC01606 by japoniamea, on Flickr



Tokyo Disneyland (東京ディズニーランド, Tōkyō Dizunīrando?) is a 115 acre (465,000 m²) theme park at the Tokyo Disney Resort located in Urayasu, Chiba, Japan, near Tokyo. Its main gate is directly adjacent to both Maihama Station and Tokyo Disneyland Station. It was the first Disney park to be built outside of the United States and opened April 15, 1983. The park was constructed by Walt Disney Imagineering in the same style as Disneyland in California and Magic Kingdom in Florida. It is owned by The Oriental Land Company, which licenses the theme from The Walt Disney Company. Tokyo Disneyland and its companion park, Tokyo DisneySea, are the only Disney parks not owned by The Walt Disney Company.

There are seven themed areas in the park, each complementing one another yet unique in their style. Made up of the World Bazaar, the four classic Disney lands: Adventureland, Westernland, Fantasyland and Tomorrowland, and two mini lands, Critter Country and Mickey's Toontown, the park is noted for its huge open spaces to accommodate the massive crowds the park receives on even moderate attendance days. In 2009, Tokyo Disneyland hosted approximately 13.65 million guests, ranking it as the third-most visited theme park in the world, behind its American sister parks, Magic Kingdom and Disneyland



DSC01240 by japoniamea, on Flickr



Cinderella`s Castle from Tokyo Disneyland


DSC01250 by japoniamea, on Flickr



DSC01248 by japoniamea, on Flickr

In Yokohama is a well known Doll Museum with with various dolls from different times and places. There is a collection of dolls representing most of the world`s countries. Here are the Romania`s and Moldova`s Dolls :


DSC00726 by japoniamea, on Flickr


Japanese Souvenirs



DSC00486 by japoniamea, on Flickr
 

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native dobrogean
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765 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
2008


Asakusa has plenty of old buildings


asakusa by Alex Carbune, on Flickr


and having the Senso-ji temple brings 200 000 to 300 000 tourist on regular days ( week-ends and hollydays brings even more )


senso-ji by Alex Carbune, on Flickr


5 story pagoda by Alex Carbune, on Flickr





5 story pagoda @ senso-ji temple by night by Alex Carbune, on Flickr




DSC03411 by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



asakusa jinja by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



you purify with this water before praying


temple well by Alex Carbune, on Flickr

you can write your wishes on this wooden plates and they will be read and burned by priests


Dorinte by Alex Carbune, on Flickr


Hozomon-dori ( dori = gate ), one of Senso-ji`s atractions


hozomon by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



Hozomon by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



Hozomon by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



Another Famous Gate , Kaminarimon-dori


kaminarimon dori by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



here you can burn incense ( for purifying too )


DSC03476 by Alex Carbune, on Flickr


sometimes begging monks can be see


japanese monk by Alex Carbune, on Flickr




after you visit the temple you can buy gifts & souvenirs from the Nakamise-dori street ( 250 m long, 85 shops on it )


Matsumoto KiYoshi by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



small shop on nakamise street by Alex Carbune, on Flickr





small shop on nakamise street by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



small shop with traditional stuff by Alex Carbune, on Flickr


if you`re feeling hungry after this, you can go to the restaurants in the area ( if you don`t speak japanese it`s not a problem, you can always point the dishes you want. this is not real food, is made from different materials and is painted to resemble the real food )


a small restaurant ( the menu is on display ) by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



one of my fav places @ Asakusa Matsuya 7th floor by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



restaurant window by Alex Carbune, on Flickr


after all of this, if you have japanese friends with fast cars you can ask them for a ride ( top speed we had was 220 km/h ).


nissan skyline by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



nissan skyline by Alex Carbune, on Flickr
 

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native dobrogean
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765 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
2008

On lake hakone there are many ships with different designs ( steam ships, cutters, etc )
I was cruising with some like this :


sailing... by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



DSC00912 by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



old american river boat style by Alex Carbune, on Flickr


I Wonder why we don`t have ships like this in Romania...


In rural Japan there are a lot of chances to met the infamous Japanese Hornet who accounts for tens of lives taken yearly. People usually make some bottle traps, they cut a piece from one side ( wide enough to let the wasp inside , also, they only remove the cap, same principle. this wasps cannot exit by flying and the bottle on the inside is very slippy ) and pour inside gum syrup ( liquid sugar ). All the wasps who enters cannot leave and die drowned.


bottle trap for the japanese hornet by Alex Carbune, on Flickr
 

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native dobrogean
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765 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
2009

The Shinkansen ( bullet train ) has cute female personel.


Cute Shinkansen Conductress by Alex Carbune, on Flickr

but the cleaners are not ...


Shinkansen C Squad by Alex Carbune, on Flickr


Kinkaku-ji (金閣寺, Temple of the Golden Pavilion), also known as Rokuon-ji (鹿苑寺, Deer Garden Temple), is a Zen Buddhist temple in Kyoto, Japan. The garden complex is an excellent example of Muromachi period garden design. It is designated as a National Special Historic Site and a National Special Landscape, and it is one of 17 World Cultural Heritage sites in Kyoto. It is also one of the most popular buildings in Japan, attracting a large number of visitors annually

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinkaku-ji

This Golden pavilion is covered in 22 kg of gold.


Kinkaku-ji by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



Kinkaku-ji [ Golden Pavilion ] Panorama by Alex Carbune, on Flickr

Adashino Nenbutsu-ji (化野念仏寺, Adashino Nenbutsuji?) is a Buddhist temple in Ukyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan. In 811 Kūkai is said to have founded a temple, then Honen altered to present Nenbutsuji. Situated high on a hill overlooking the city from the northwest, it sits in an area where since Heian period people abandoned the bodies exposing to the wind and rain. Now, some eight thousand Buddhism statuettes, collected around 1903 then scattering around Adashino, memorialize the souls of the dead.


for the dead... (Nembutsu-ji ) by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



Obelisc by Alex Carbune, on Flickr


Nanzen-ji (南禅寺, Nanzen-ji), or Zuiryusan Nanzen-ji, formerly Zenrin-ji (禅林寺, Zenrin-ji), is a Zen Buddhist temple in Kyoto, Japan. Emperor Kameyama established it in 1291 on the site of his previous detached palace. It is also the headquarters of the Nanzen-ji branch of Rinzai Zen. Zenkei Shibayama, who provided a popular commentary on the Mumonkan, was an abbot of the monastery.


zen garden ( Nanzenji) by Alex Carbune, on Flickr


the apprentice by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



room ( Nanzenji temple ) by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



Zen garden inside Nanzen-ji temple by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



inside Nanzenji temple by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



walking down the street by Alex Carbune, on Flickr


The romantic "Moon Crossing Bridge" (渡月橋,Togetsukyō), notable for its views of cherry blossoms and autumn colors on the slopes of Mt Arashiyama.



Kyoto Togetsu-kyo ( beyond bridge) by Alex Carbune, on Flickr


on some rivers, the locals covered part of the river course with wooden platforms where you can enjoy japanese cousine.


lunch time by Alex Carbune, on Flickr


back to Tokyo and to it`s famous Hama Rikyu gardens , where Nakajima tea house can be found :

 

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native dobrogean
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765 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
2010

A torii (鳥居・鳥栖・鶏栖, lit. bird perch) (English: /ˈtɔəri.iː/) is a traditional Japanese gate most commonly found at the entrance of or within a Shinto shrine, where it symbolically marks the transition from the sacred to the profane (see Sacred-profane dichotomy). The presence of a torii at the entrance is usually the simplest way to identify Shinto shrines, and a small torii icon represents them on Japanese road maps. They are however a common sight at Japanese Buddhist temples too, where they stand at the entrance of the temple's own shrine, called chinjusha (鎮守社, tutelary god shrine) and usually very small.

Their first appearance in Japan can be reliably pinpointed to at least the mid-Heian period because they are mentioned in a text written in 922. The oldest stone extant torii was built in the 12th century and belongs to a Hachiman Shrine in Yamagata prefecture. The oldest wooden torii is a ryōbu torii (see description below) at Kubō Hachiman Shrine in Yamanashi prefecture built in 1535.

Torii were traditionally made from wood or stone, but today they can be also made of reinforced concrete, copper, stainless steel or other materials. They are usually either unpainted or painted vermilion with a black upper lintel. Inari shrines typically have many torii. A person who has been successful in business often donates a torii to the shrine in gratitude. Fushimi Inari-taisha in Kyoto has thousands of such torii, each bearing the donor's name.



Ueno Park Torii by Alex Carbune, on Flickr


<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/avgvstvs/4211981151/" title="Ueno Park Torii ( detail ) by Alex Carbune, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2649/4211981151_70fd9ec65c.jpg" width="500" height="332" alt="Ueno Park Torii ( detail )" /></a>

on my daily walks i saw Tsukuba`s fire dep at work ( exercise ) :


Tsukuba Fire Dep Rescue Simulation by Alex Carbune, on Flickr


Tsukuba Fire Dep Rescue Simulation by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



Tsukuba Fire Dep Rescue Simulation by Alex Carbune, on Flickr


The Rainbow Bridge (レインボーブリッジ, Reinbō burijji) is a suspension bridge crossing northern Tokyo Bay between Shibaura Pier and the Odaiba waterfront development in Minato, Tokyo, Japan.

Construction started in 1987 and was completed in 1993. The bridge is 798 metres (2,618 ft) long with a main span of 580 metres (1,903 ft).Officially called the "Shuto Expressway No. 11 Daiba Route - Port of Tokyo Connector Bridge," the name "'Rainbow Bridge" was decided by the public. It is colloquially known as "RB."

The towers supporting the bridge are white in color, designed to harmonize with the skyline of central Tokyo seen from Odaiba. There are lamps placed on the wires supporting the bridge, which are illuminated into three different colors, red, white and green every night using solar energy obtained during the day.

The bridge can be accessed by foot from Tamachi Station (JR East) or Shibaura-futō Station (Yurikamome) on the mainland side.



Rainbow Bridge Panorama (Tokyo Bay ) by Alex Carbune, on Flickr


The Tokyo Sky Tree (東京スカイツリー, Tōkyō Sukai Tsurī) (originally referred to as New Tokyo Tower) is a broadcasting, restaurant, and observation tower under construction in the Narihirabashi/Oshiage area of Sumida ward in Tokyo, Japan. As of 29 March 2010 it is the tallest artificial structure in Japan. When completed, the tower will have a height of 634.00 m (2,080 ft). The present Tokyo Tower (333 m) is not tall enough to give complete digital terrestrial television broadcasting coverage, due to the construction of many nearby high-rise buildings in the central part of the Tokyo Metropolis.

The project is being led by Tobu Railway and a group of six terrestrial broadcasters (headed by public broadcaster NHK). Construction of the tower is scheduled to be completed by December 2011, with the public opening in spring 2012. The completed structure will be the highlight of a massive commercial development around Oshiage Station.


Asakusa by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



Asakusa Sky Tree by Alex Carbune, on Flickr


Matsuya Co., Ltd. (株式会社松屋) TYO: 8237 is a Japanese department store in Tokyo. Two stores are in Ginza (est. 1925) and Asakusa (est. 1930).


Matsuya Asakusa by Alex Carbune, on Flickr
 

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On lake hakone there are many ships with different designs ( steam ships, cutters, etc )
I was cruising with some like this :


sailing... by Alex Carbune, on Flickr




DSC00912 by Alex Carbune, on Flickr



old american river boat style by Alex Carbune, on Flickr


I Wonder why we don`t have ships like this in Romania...


In rural Japan there are a lot of chances to met the infamous Japanese Hornet who accounts for tens of lives taken yearly. People usually make some bottle traps, they cut a piece from one side ( wide enough to let the wasp inside , also, they only remove the cap, same principle. this wasps cannot exit by flying and the bottle on the inside is very slippy ) and pour inside gum syrup ( liquid sugar ). All the wasps who enters cannot leave and die drowned.


bottle trap for the japanese hornet by Alex Carbune, on Flickr
Hakone,renumit pt spa ;)
 
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