Skyscraper City Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
real gooner
Joined
·
4,651 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Next month will see the start of Nairobi's first eco-housing estate, built to make water and power go farther, as more than 7 months of water rationing, with worse expected, focuses minds on how to guarantee water and electricity supplies, and cut galloping utility bills.
The 18-house development promises to cut by three-quarters the amount of tapped municipal water each house needs, through both water harvesting and recycling, and to save up to half each household's electricity bills using solar power wiring.
The project is the brainchild of environmentalists, Mr. Mathenge and Janet Mathenge, part of the management of Fair Acres Country Homes, which is building the eco-estate in Karen, just off the Hekima Rd, half a kilometre from the main Langata Road.
The need for householders to find alternative sources of water and power has now become urgent across much of Nairobi, following from a run of poor rains that has exacerbated the problems of falling water tables in the Nairobi basin, under the pressure of too many boreholes, and water losses caused by leakages from the aging municipal water system.
With much of the country fueled by hydro-electric power, the water shortage is also now leading to electricity problems. In June, Kenya witnessed the closure of Masinga Dam, part of the 7-Folks Dam, as a result of the ongoing drought. Reports in the local media suggest the shutdown could lead to as much as a 48 per cent drop in the power generated from the Dam.
As Kenya, Kenyans, and the Water and Energy Ministries all now wait for the next rainy season in October in the hope that the country's water situation will then improve, the eco-housing project represents a dream come true for green consumers, said Ms Mathenge, who claims the houses will not only provide their own cheap water and electricity alternatives, but will also help define future developments in a way that resonates with the realities of the environment.
“This is important for Kenya (in a time) when people are now planting 3 or 4 trees after cutting one, global warming is taking place, and so on,” said Mathenge. “We want to do something that other people can copy.”
As trend setters, Fair Acres Homes will be working to make the houses blend in visually with their natural environment, by using trees and creeping plants. For every tree cut during construction, the developers would be planting four more, said Mathenge. The houses' water recycling will also mean the gardens stay green throughout the year, even in the drought months.
For the water recycling, the area will utilise only 30 per cent of normal municipal water consumption, reducing water bills. The rest of the water supply will come from rainfall, based on the organisation's estimates of an average of 900 mm of rain fall each year in Karen. The harvested rainwater from each roof top will be filtered and UV treated, and be suitable for drinking, bathing and domestic use.
Effluent will also be treated daily though a Bio-box system recently shipped in from South Africa. This Biobox system is a complete waste water treatment system also known as a packaged plant, is suitable for homes and organisaitons producing from 2m³ to 320m³ (320,000 litres) of sewage per day, according to the Biobox Southern Africa organisation. The system can treat both grey water (from laundries, baths, basins, kitchen sinks) and black water (toilet water). Once treated, the water is suitable for flushing toilets, watering fields and for irrigation.
Fair Acres Homes will also be taking advantage of the 3,000 million free megawatts of solar power that Kenya soaks up daily from the sun. Only half of the development's electricity will come from the Kenya Power and Lighting Company. The rest will be solar generated. The solar panels will produce enough electricity to heat water, using Australian technology. The homes will also all be fitted with low energy bulbs and the area with LED (Light Emitting Diode) street lights, saving energy.
Each villa will have four bedrooms, all en-suite, kitchen, dining room, lounge, garage and servants’ quarters for two people. They also have two walk-out terraces to the landscaped garden and 24-hour security.
Mathenge claims pricing is competitive by Karen standards. The developers are offering a 20 per cent discount for pre-sales. “Regular Karen homes are worth Sh40 million, but our pre-sales are Sh30 million,” she said, “We are trying to keep it (the cost) low.”
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
714 Posts
finally off the ground !

its will be in two phases - one phase will be completed november of 2014, and the next completed end 2015




 

·
Registered
Joined
·
714 Posts
from Metropolitan property Magazine - MAY /JUNE 2014 - in KE

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
714 Posts
Phase 2 almost complete:
Fair Acres Country Homes is a beautiful development of just 19 4-bedroom villas, each on half an acre and carefully designed to resonate with the environment. All bedrooms are generously proportioned and en-suite. Each villa boasts two DSQs, four parking spaces, a laundry room, two terraces facing the garden, entry porch and 24 hour security on site. Amenities include, solar water heating, borehole, inverter power back up system and treated effluent water reused for flushing toilets and irrigation. Fair Acres is located on Hekima Rd off Fair Acres Rd, Karen, allowing you easy access to all local amenities, including shopping at Crossroads Karen, and Galleria, as well as office hubs, schools, Karen Hospital and Karen Country Club.




http://www.kenyan-real-estate.com/listing/4-Bedroom-House-in-Kenya-1757.html
 
  • Like
Reactions: Kenyan_yungin
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top