SkyscraperCity banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
452 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
KAUST: History in the making
Siraj Wahab | Arab News —


THUWAL, Jeddah: After years of meticulous planning and sourcing some of the best scientific minds in the world, the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) will be a dream made real.

On Wednesday at 7:30 p.m, Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Abdullah is scheduled to inaugurate a research university that has caught the imagination of the world scientific community and has raised huge expectations among Saudis.

KAUST promises to usher in a new era of scientific investigation, discovery and education in the Kingdom. In the gleaming towers and immaculate laboratory and library blocks nestled in what just a few years ago was raw desert, some of the finest scientists and researchers will work alongside talented research students from Saudi Arabia and the rest of the world.

At the inauguration, King Abdullah will play host to heads of state, global business leaders, Nobel laureates and some of the world's most celebrated academics who have been invited to the ceremony here at Thuwal, 80 km north of Jeddah.

The king on Tuesday visited the university in order to see for himself the preparations for Wednesday's inauguration. About 3,000 dignitaries including heads of state and scientists will attend the opening. Turkish President Abdullah Gul, Malaysia’s King Tuanku Sultan Mizan Zainal Abidin, Sudanese President Omar Bashir, Philippine President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo and Mauritanian President Mohamed Ould Abdul Aziz have already arrived for the inauguration.

During the inspection tour of the university, King Abdullah was accompanied by Prince Muqrin, chief of intelligence, Prince Faisal bin Abdullah bin Muhammad, minister of education, Prince Khaled bin Abdullah, a member of the university's Board of Trustees, other princes and top officials.

Petroleum and Mineral Resources Minister Ali Al-Naimi, who is also chairman of the university's Board of Trustees, briefed the king on the progress of work at the campus. Studies started at the university on Sept. 5 after the completion of building classrooms. King Abdullah later visited an exhibition being staged on the occasion. The king was also briefed on the opening ceremony.

The graduate-level university, King Abdullah’s brainchild, opened its doors on Sept. 5 to the 400 students who have been admitted from 60 countries around the world to engage in postgraduate studies in engineering. Seventy faculty members are in place to teach them. The students and faculty at KAUST were carefully selected to help achieve the university’s goals.

“We have set our sights on reaching the brightest students, brimming with potential, from around the world, ready to learn from their mentors and from one another, ripe to begin making a contribution to the progress of humanity,” said Al-Naimi.

Some of the faculty members spoke to a large group of international journalists who were taken on a tour of the sprawling campus on Tuesday. The center of attraction for many was Shaheen, the fastest supercomputer in the Middle East and one of the 14 most powerful in the world.

“Developed with IBM, it is capable of 222 teraflops, or solving 222 trillion complicated calculations per second,” Richard Orme, head of KAUST’s Center for Deep Computing Research, told the visiting journalists.

According to Orme, Shaheen is the second-fastest computer outside of Europe and the fastest in all of Asia.

“One of the most powerful supercomputers in an academic environment, the system instantly makes KAUST a key player in the field of computational science,” he told reporters. “Shaheen will facilitate across dozens of disciplines in carrying out cutting-edge experiments, joint research collaborations with KAUST’s research partners located all over the world and further the development of a knowledge-based society in Saudi Arabia.”

Al-Naimi said Shaheen “gives the Middle East its first bona fide locally owned and operated supercomputer.”

“Hopefully the influence of that in promoting a culture of computational science and engineering will go far beyond KAUST because a computer is one experimental facility that can be shared easily across a high-speed network,” he added.

These partnerships with the private sector are also part of KAUST’s commitment to economic development and diversification in the Kingdom.

“In Saudi Arabia we need to diversify the base of our economy from dependence on a single commodity,” said Nadhmi A. Al-Nasr, interim executive vice president of administration and finance. “A knowledge-based economy is the future of the Kingdom.”

The inauguration ceremony will be broadcast live as a webcast on the KAUST inauguration website (http://inauguration.kaust.edu.sa/).









 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,405 Posts
from the press today:


KAUST: History in the making
Siraj Wahab | Arab News




Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Abdullah is being briefed by officials on the facilities at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology in Thuwal during an inspection tour on Tuesday. (SPA)


THUWAL, Jeddah: After years of meticulous planning and sourcing some of the best scientific minds in the world, the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) will be a dream made real.

On Wednesday at 7:30 p.m, Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Abdullah is scheduled to inaugurate a research university that has caught the imagination of the world scientific community and has raised huge expectations among Saudis.

KAUST promises to usher in a new era of scientific investigation, discovery and education in the Kingdom. In the gleaming towers and immaculate laboratory and library blocks nestled in what just a few years ago was raw desert, some of the finest scientists and researchers will work alongside talented research students from Saudi Arabia and the rest of the world.

At the inauguration, King Abdullah will play host to heads of state, global business leaders, Nobel laureates and some of the world's most celebrated academics who have been invited to the ceremony here at Thuwal, 80 km north of Jeddah.

The king on Tuesday visited the university in order to see for himself the preparations for Wednesday's inauguration. About 3,000 dignitaries including heads of state and scientists will attend the opening. Turkish President Abdullah Gul, Malaysia’s King Tuanku Sultan Mizan Zainal Abidin, Sudanese President Omar Bashir, Philippine President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo and Mauritanian President Mohamed Ould Abdul Aziz have already arrived for the inauguration.

During the inspection tour of the university, King Abdullah was accompanied by Prince Muqrin, chief of intelligence, Prince Faisal bin Abdullah bin Muhammad, minister of education, Prince Khaled bin Abdullah, a member of the university's Board of Trustees, other princes and top officials.

Petroleum and Mineral Resources Minister Ali Al-Naimi, who is also chairman of the university's Board of Trustees, briefed the king on the progress of work at the campus. Studies started at the university on Sept. 5 after the completion of building classrooms. King Abdullah later visited an exhibition being staged on the occasion. The king was also briefed on the opening ceremony.

The graduate-level university, King Abdullah’s brainchild, opened its doors on Sept. 5 to the 400 students who have been admitted from 60 countries around the world to engage in postgraduate studies in engineering. Seventy faculty members are in place to teach them. The students and faculty at KAUST were carefully selected to help achieve the university’s goals.

“We have set our sights on reaching the brightest students, brimming with potential, from around the world, ready to learn from their mentors and from one another, ripe to begin making a contribution to the progress of humanity,” said Al-Naimi.

Some of the faculty members spoke to a large group of international journalists who were taken on a tour of the sprawling campus on Tuesday. The center of attraction for many was Shaheen, the fastest supercomputer in the Middle East and one of the 14 most powerful in the world.

“Developed with IBM, it is capable of 222 teraflops, or solving 222 trillion complicated calculations per second,” Richard Orme, head of KAUST’s Center for Deep Computing Research, told the visiting journalists.

According to Orme, Shaheen is the second-fastest computer outside of Europe and the fastest in all of Asia.

“One of the most powerful supercomputers in an academic environment, the system instantly makes KAUST a key player in the field of computational science,” he told reporters. “Shaheen will facilitate across dozens of disciplines in carrying out cutting-edge experiments, joint research collaborations with KAUST’s research partners located all over the world and further the development of a knowledge-based society in Saudi Arabia.”

Al-Naimi said Shaheen “gives the Middle East its first bona fide locally owned and operated supercomputer.”

“Hopefully the influence of that in promoting a culture of computational science and engineering will go far beyond KAUST because a computer is one experimental facility that can be shared easily across a high-speed network,” he added.

These partnerships with the private sector are also part of KAUST’s commitment to economic development and diversification in the Kingdom.

“In Saudi Arabia we need to diversify the base of our economy from dependence on a single commodity,” said Nadhmi A. Al-Nasr, interim executive vice president of administration and finance. “A knowledge-based economy is the future of the Kingdom.”

The inauguration ceremony will be broadcast live as a webcast on the KAUST inauguration website (http://inauguration.kaust.edu.sa/).

source
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Beginning of a new boom
Khaled Almaeena | Editor in Chief



Today Saudis have two reasons to celebrate. The first is because of National Day, a day to commemorate the unification and establishment of Saudi Arabia. A vast tract of land, in which brigands and highwaymen preyed upon the unsuspecting traveler, where loyalty was only to the leader of the tribe, was unified by the vision and determination of one man: Abdul Aziz Al-Saud. He braved elements, geography and hostile forces to build a country called Saudi Arabia. In a European context he was a Cavour, a Bismarck. But history reveals that he encountered — and overcame — more challenges than they did.

The second cause for celebration is the inauguration of the King Abdullah University of Science & Technology (KAUST) — a project Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Abdullah has dreamed about for the last 25 years.

King Abdullah is a man of few words; he says what he means and means what he says. And his words have now been transformed into a university with great scientific objectives that will serve humanity far beyond Saudi Arabia’s borders.

King Abdullah has always stressed education as the driving force for development and progress. When fully operational, KAUST will help make knowledge, after oil and industry, the country’s third vital driving force.

In a changing world with new and, at times, deadly challenges, it is vital that the Kingdom keep up with others in science and technology. It also has to make good use of its human resources if it is not to be dependent on others. A country’s self-reliance begins with its human resources.

It is important that we be leaders in technology rather than constant consumers. In the long term it is what will ensure our survival.

The problems in the country are many. The environment, the lack of water resources, issues pertaining to health and social development. They all depend on trained minds that can come up with answers to the questions they raise. King Abdullah has paved the way to the answers by creating this great university in an area where only a few years ago there were only a handful coastal villages.

King Abdullah’s vision is that of a nation on the march. Every Saudi should realize that we are called to be visionaries and progressives. We need to be travelers on the road of life and not merely spectators. For this we have to evaluate ourselves, both as individuals and as members of a larger society.

What is our present condition? How are we performing? What have we contributed to our country? It is easy to utter glowing words, to please those with authority, to accommodate, but that is self-deception. What we need are men and women who can stand tall, articulate their views forthrightly and participate in nationbuilding.

Unfortunately there exist sloth and complacency, but they should be shunned. Our young should be prepared for the future by being provided with values emanating from our own Islamic tradition that directs them to embrace the world with tolerance and to accept others. We have to re-establish a society in which extremist ideologies neither exist nor are secretly admired or supported from afar.

Ours should be a society in which a meritocracy prevails, where men and women work to contribute to the progress of the country and the family of nations.

Ours should also be a society of role models in all fields with a special emphasis on the family, the anchor of young people’s hopes and goals.

The media have a role in all this by focusing on issues concerning all, by reporting the truth, by exposing irregularities, by being accurate and by not indulging in sensationalism. The media are an important element in any society, and it is vital that media play its part with responsibility and act as a source of convergence rather than divergence.

Thanks to oil, this country has seen not one but two economic booms. We hope today will mark the beginning of a new boom; a knowledge boom that will be the foundation of an advanced, highly skilled, high-tech society in which honest and hard-working men and women live in freedom and dignity as partners and citizens.

Such a society will be one that cares for the less fortunate and contributes not only to the well-being of those within its borders but also to others far beyond them.

source
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

KAUST research to focus on solar energy: Al-Naimi
Asma Alsharif | Reuters


JEDDAH: Research at the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) may help Saudi Arabia develop solar energy to provide for a significant portion of the Kingdom’s power needs, Saudi Minister for Petroleum and Mineral Resources Ali Al-Naimi said on Tuesday.

It aims to make solar a major contributor to energy supply in the next 5-10 years, he added.

“Saudi Arabia aspires to export as much solar energy in the future as it exports oil now,” Al-Naimi said.

Apart from cleaning up domestic fuels to reduce emissions, the Kingdom is also looking at carbon capture and sequestration, Al-Naimi said. KAUST would also eventually carry out research into algae for storing CO2 emissions, he added.

Al-Naimi said the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) does not need to cut output next year, according to the latest oil supply and demand estimates. Demand for Saudi crude is increasing, and this is evidence the world economy is recovering from recession, Al-Naimi said in an interview to Reuters.

“No, based on the current (demand and supply estimates), there is no need of course, right now,” Al-Naimi said.

“But you never know, this is a moving target, it is a very active market. The world economy seems to be recovering. I hope it will recover fast and therefore it will impact demand. If demand rises of course supply has to match it... Demand for our oil is rising, and so we are — at least I am — convinced that economic growth has started and will continue.”

Global oil inventories are above the five-year average in defiance of OPEC output curbs that have aimed to match supply with a fall in demand following the economic downturn.

Some oil market observers have said the producer group, which pumps more than a third of the world’s oil, would have to cut output again next year to balance the market.

OPEC pledged to cut output by 4.2 million barrels per day (bpd) last year, and the curbs have helped the oil price recover to around $70 from a low of $32.40 in December.

At its most recent meeting earlier this month, the OPEC agreed to leave output unchanged and Al-Naimi brushed off concerns about high inventories, saying economic growth was driving the oil price. Oil at between $70-$80 a barrel would bring investment in new energy supplies and prevent a future supply crunch, Al-Naimi said. The Kingdom has targeted around $75 as a fair price for both consumers and producers.

“As long as the prices are where they are, like $70 to $80, I think investments will continue... and with so much spare capacity available in the world now we foresee no shortages in the future,” he said. Al-Naimi reiterated that Saudi Arabia was pumping around 8 million bpd of oil and its output capacity was 12.5 million bpd.

Saudi Arabia has no plans for now to develop more capacity after completing the boost to 12.5 million bpd this year, Al-Naimi said.

“Let us see what happens to worldwide demand and if we see significant growth, we have a policy of maintaining between 1.5 to 2 million bpd spare capacity all the time... So we are not thinking today about future expansion but you know, you have to spend a lot of money to stay where you are.”

source
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
National Day | KAUST Supplement: King’s vision becomes a reality
Siraj Wahab I Arab News




Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Abdullah, accompanied by top officials, inspects development work on the KAUST campus on June 10, 2009. (SPA)


Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Abdullah has been a passionate voice for education reform for years, realizing that the challenges of the future will need innovative solutions from the world's best minds.

Minds are shaped by society and culture, but the quality of education determines who will excel and who will fall behind in the global march for progress. The king has promoted educational reform throughout the entire Saudi system, from kindergarten to graduate school.

Initiatives include important changes in curriculum, better training for teachers and greater resources for them to employ, ensuring that high-school graduates possess the skills needed to join the work force or to continue on to college or university and that the Kingdom has graduate schools second to none.

King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) is the capstone of these reforms. Thanks to the efforts of Minister of Petroleum and Mineral Resources Ali Al-Naimi and an extensive team of Saudi Aramco engineers, researchers, and some of the world's leading academicians, KAUST is more than a vision.

“As a new house of wisdom, the university shall be a beacon for peace, hope, and reconciliation and shall serve the people of the Kingdom and benefit all the peoples of the world in keeping with the teachings of the Holy Qur'an, which explains that God created mankind in order for us to come to know each other,” King Abdullah said in his remarks at the groundbreaking ceremony.

He said KAUST would be an institution that would help shape the future of the nation and higher education around the globe. “In its design, construction and operations the university will conserve natural resources and demonstrate by precept and example the value of responsible environmental stewardship. Since universities striving for excellence depend on an atmosphere of exploration and initiative, nurturing and protecting freedom of research, thought and discourse related to scholarly work will be among the primary objectives of King Abdullah University of Science and Technology,” said King Abdullah.

“Our intention is to create an enduring model for advanced education and scientific research. A complete residential and academic compound will permit the faculty, staff, students, associates and their families to enjoy a rich and broad range of educational programs and social amenities. In providing a strong foundation for all aspects of life and work in the university, we aim to ensure its success in promoting the economic development and social prosperity of the people of the Kingdom and of the world.”

Indeed, King Abdullah's vision in launching KAUST was nothing short of historic. It sets out as an international center of excellence where students and their professors have been selected purely for academic qualities and potential and they will be given a liberal campus in which debate, research and innovation can flourish.

KAUST will be like no other university, either in the Kingdom or in the Arab world. Until now Arab institutions of higher learning, especially in their science and technology faculties, have all been utilitarian. They are designed to equip their students with the exacting qualifications they will need for the workplace. There is little time in their academic programs for original research. They teach what is already known. They are not set up to discover new knowledge, even though masters and doctoral dissertations do, from time to time, throw up new insights and understandings.

KAUST is configured the other way round. It has already drawn in the very best academic teachers to work with the very best young male and female minds gathered from all over the world. King Abdullah has said that KAUST will serve as a lighthouse of knowledge for all mankind. And there is one very important factor that will underpin this ambition. Over and above the scholarships that King Abdullah himself is endowing each year, the new university will be one of the most, if not indeed the most, generously endowed academic institutions in the world.

The constant clamor of research scientists everywhere is for more funding. The pace of scientific investigation is often limited by its commercial potential. The frequent complaint is that pure science is at the back of the queue when research grants are being handed out.

As an independent university governed by a self-perpetuating board of trustees and supported by a multibillion-dollar endowment, KAUST convenes the best minds — based strictly on merit — and creates a collaborative community of passionate and talented researchers from around the world. The university acts as a catalyst for research that applies science and technology to problems of human need, social advancement and economic development.

Charles M. Vest, former president of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, underlined the role of the research university in the 21st century at KAUST groundbreaking ceremony two years ago. “Great universities seek to understand the past, engage the present, and shape the future. Universities that have a strong focus on science and technology have a particular responsibility to engage the present and shape the future, but they too must understand the past and learn its lessons. They must do so in order to clearly understand that they are at the core of the flow of human history and essential to human progress.”

Vest said KAUST was breaking the mold and taking a bold, new step. “This is a noble and farsighted undertaking. It is also a voyage into the unknown. KAUST has set its compass by consulting widely and learning lessons from the experiences of great research universities throughout the world. But the founders of KAUST also understand the value of a fresh start, the uniqueness of its location, the necessity of its engagement with the world community, and its orientation toward the future.”

The former MIT chief said the potential benefits the new university brings with it are almost limitless. “Research universities create opportunity. They create opportunity for individual students by inspiring them, educating them, orienting them toward the future, teaching them that they are responsible for their own lives, and preparing them to advance the human condition,” Vest said.

Vest said that KAUST might become part of a new, virtual entity that will shape higher education in the decades to come.

“In my view, a global meta university is emerging. This meta university consists of the cyber-infrastructure, scholarly digital archives, open-access teaching materials, and virtual communities of scholars and researchers,” Vest said. “It is the substrate on which the 21st century research university will be built. Like the computer operating system Linux, knowledge creation and teaching at each university will be elevated by the efforts of a multitude of individuals and groups all over the world. The meta university will rapidly adapt to the changing learning styles of students who have grown up in a computationally rich environment. The greatest benefits of the meta university will accrue to developing nations because such shared resources can accelerate and reduce the cost of the development of new schools, colleges, and universities.”

Unlike a meta university that will exist in cyberspace, KAUST sits on the Red Sea coast with students in the labs, lecture halls and classrooms and professors at the lecterns. KAUST's vision is of a bright future for the Kingdom and its people.

Wishing to rekindle and spread the great and noble virtue of learning that has marked the Arab and Muslim worlds in earlier times, King Abdullah said: “It is my desire that this new university becomes one of the world's great institutions of research; that it educates and trains future generations of scientists, engineers and technologists; and that it fosters, on the basis of merit and excellence, collaboration and cooperation with other great research universities and the private sector.”

source
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,405 Posts
the outstanding grand opening was last night









this project is completed now just after 23 months from the construction beginning !!
:banana::banana::banana::cheers::cheers:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,405 Posts
Dr. Edward Hartley Sargent
Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering
University of Toronto
Toronto, Canada
View Dr. Edward Hartley Sargent's presentation at the GRP Symposium


Q & A

Dr. Edward Hartley Sargent, KAUST Investigator and Canada Research Chair in Nanotechnology at the University of Toronto, discusses how he plans to create low-cost paint-on cells that convert solar rays into electricity.

Solar cells are either efficient or inexpensive. Dr. Sargent‘s research will lay the foundation to eliminate this solar energy compromise by applying KAUST resources combined with his research and his intellectual drive and to create efficient and low-cost solar cells.

Like KAUST, Dr. Sargent‘s research is innately interdisciplinary. His research spans materials chemistry, device fabrication, device optimization, careful optoelectronic characterization, and even ultrafast spectroscopic investigation.

From an early age, Dr. Sargent embraced the opportunity to solve problems though a set of mathematical tools and physical ideas. It was this desire that led Dr. Sargent to pursue a bachelor‘s in Engineering Physics from Queen's University and a doctorate in Electrical and Computer Engineering (Photonics) from the University of Toronto.

Dr. Sargent has been described as one of the most distinguished scientists of his generation – a valid claim about a man who believes that nanotechnology is "turning fascinating science and growing technological agility into real applications that transform people's lives and society."

Can renewable energy sources like solar move from "alternative" to "primary" in the near future? What would be a realistic timeline?

The move is underway right now as producers of solar cells scale up production of gradually lower- and lower-cost conventional photovoltaic cells. That's the evolution of the industry. The revolution will come when technologies disrupt this curve with the combination of high efficiency and low cost.

How do you see advanced photovoltaic technology working for Saudi Arabia, the world‘s largest exporter of petroleum?

Saudi Arabia is an exceptional place -- not only for its fossil fuels but also for its vast solar resource. Its landmass receives enough solar energy to power the entire world's energy needs many times over. Saudi Arabia has also established itself also a proven leader in the management and export of energy resources. This will surely be a crucial skill as solar goes primary and goes global.

Your University of Toronto research group has developed plastic solar cells that use nanotechnology to convert the sun‘s energy into power with more efficiency. How important is this achievement? Is this a foundational step toward even better technology?

This is an absolutely foundational step towards better technology. We are very excited about developing advanced, low-cost infrared-optimized solar cells that can be paired with visible photovoltaics to harvest the sun's rays. It is both efficient and economically sound technology.

Your research group is working on ways to paint light-sensitive nanoparticles on glass. What are the potential applications for this research? What does this mean for photovoltaics?

The applications range from portable power, (for example a wearable battery booster) all the way to large-scale solar power conversion that would contribute to the larger energy grid. We keep the main idea in focus -- the sun's full spectrum deserves efficient harvesting.

Other than the obvious – abundant sunshine – what about KAUST makes it a good location for solar energy research?

KAUST‘s location for solar energy research is valuable for three reasons:

* Exceptional facilities, including a focus on a large-scale solar R&D installation, that go far beyond the small-scale prototyping most universities can achieve.
* Faculty and graduate students attracted from around the world with a focus on excellence without compromise.
* An institutional architecture that blends core scientific and engineering areas (departments) with project-oriented centers. This is the ideal matrix for the highly interdisciplinary research that is associated with advanced photovoltaics.

What are the immediate benefits to society of having more efficient sources of solar power, and what advances do you hope to see in the coming years?

The immediate benefit, even deployed on the small scale, is portable power. The bigger and longer-term benefit is for the world to have an ongoing solution to its energy needs instead of living off a finite supply of stored energy.

You have noted that solar research is "innately interdisciplinary" and spans materials chemistry, device fabrication, and device optimization. What role can a focus on solar energy at KAUST contribute to the global research and development community working on photovoltaic technology development and implementation?

KAUST's Solar Energy Center will play a unique role. It will combine world-leading science that will investigate new physical phenomena and new materials with outstanding engineering research through a large-scale R&D solar installation. In addition, it will have best equipment within which to judge new solar innovations on a level playing field.

How will the relationship between KAUST and the University of Toronto benefit researchers, and what is your role in this collaboration?

Each day my students at University of Toronto strive to strengthen our ties with KAUST as it emerges. We help find faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students; we provide input on how to deploy KAUST's exceptional resources to create a unique world-class infrastructure; and we build stronger ties through exchanges of personnel, including spending many weeks of the year on the KAUST campus.

A few years ago, BusinessWeek described how your research group "stumbled onto" the discovery that a plastic solar cell could absorb ultraviolet light. Talk about the role that serendipity plays in research, and how the KAUST Investigator award contributes to your ability to learn more about nanoscience.

Serendipity plays a crucial role. We have just published the first report after harvesting multiple excitons in the photocurrent flowing in a device. Only by becoming interested in the ultraviolet (UV) behavior of this photodetector - not directly relevant to photovoltaics but of broad scientific interest - did we stumble on this remarkably sensitive UV detector. Being a KAUST investigator gives us the foundational support for our joint investigations with KAUST-based scientists to allow us to follow our intuitions, pursue surprising results in the lab, and discover.

You wrote a book called The Dance of Molecules: How Nanotechnology is Changing Our Lives. In the four years since it was published, how has nanotechnology further changed our lives? How will the work you are undertaking, along with the work that will begin soon at KAUST, benefit society?

The field has advanced vastly in the few years since the book was published. In medicine, nanotechnology-based biosensors are leading to the early, sensitive, and specific detection and classification of diseases. In optical imaging, highly sensitive light detectors based on nanoparticles have advanced by leaps and bounds and are nearing commercialization. And in energy, researchers at KAUST, University of Toronto, and indeed around the world are rapidly moving toward efficient, low-cost solar cells.

source
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,405 Posts
Boeing becomes a founding member of KAUST program

By Saudi Gazette Staff
THUWAL - King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) announced on Wednesday that Boeing has become a member of the KAUST Industrial Collaboration Program (KICP).
KAUST’s Interim Vice President of Economic Development Ahmad Al-Khowaiter signed an agreement with Boeing Saudi Arabia President Ahmed Jazzar that makes Boeing, the world’s leading aerospace company, a key part of the University’s economic development program.
“Companies and universities need to be innovative if they are to remain globally competitive,” Al-Khowaiter said after the signing ceremony in Thuwal. “KICP membership provides our collaborators with recruiting and outreach support, offers both employment and funding prospects to students, and proffers challenging and meaningful research collaborations for our faculty.” KICP is designed to maximize the chances of effective industrial collaboration within the Kingdom and internationally by engaging key partners, all with a keen interest in the translation of knowledge into economic growth and job creation. KAUST is acting as a significant investor by developing infrastructure and providing substantial leverage potential to industry.
Al-Khowaiter noted that KICP enriches the research experience while also promoting economic development in the Kingdom by providing opportunities for the University, and its associated academic partners, to collaborate with outside groups.
“Boeing is defined by its technological edge,” Jazzar said. “We believe that working with KAUST’s professors and students on innovative technology research will help Boeing assimilate new ideas and innovative processes into our products and programs. This also is good for Saudi Arabia because it will help grow the capabilities of the Saudi research and development and scientific community to meet emerging needs within the Kingdom.”
“Boeing is actively looking to partner with the best researchers around the world to find and develop the best technology solutions for our customers, and we look forward to working with the people at KAUST,” added Peter Hoffman, director of Global Research and Development Strategy at Boeing Research & Technology, the company’s advanced, central R&D unit.
Drawing on global best practices, the University is establishing a Technology Transfer Office, an Industrial Collaboration Program, and a Research Park to support the creation of new businesses.
“KAUST will provide a home for existing companies seeking access to its academic strengths, an incubator, an entrepreneurship program, and the benefit of a regional seed and venture fund network,” said Dr. Charles Kingdon, director of Research Park and Industrial Collaboration. “KAUST seeks to create a single academic/industrial community free from the traditional artificial divides in order to drive innovation faster and more creatively.”
KICP funds are used to finance KICP initiatives, to support educational outreach to the University community and others in the region, and to support strategic studies and collaboration with other academic resources in Saudi Arabia.
There are three categories within KICP: Founder, Supporter, and Small Business. Each category carries a three-year commitment and comes with numerous benefits. Founders enjoy several privileges, including membership on the KICP Industrial Advisory Board, access to industrial information and match-making between academic programs and industrial needs, and privileged access to KAUST’s international research network.
The benefits of being a Supporter include in-Kingdom match-making among industrial collaborators, affiliates, research projects, faculty, and students as well as the opportunity to recruit talented and motivated students for jobs and internships.
The Small Business membership level will help small companies and KAUST-driven start-ups develop by using the University and its global network of faculty and resources. Additional benefits include access to advice and mentoring from the service team within the Innovation Center.

source
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,405 Posts
$25 million CU-Saudi link will boost nanoscience research, with focus on sustainability


A new partnership between Cornell and King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia promises to strengthen Cornell's research efforts in energy and sustainability.

The Cornell University-KAUST Center for Research and Education will receive an estimated $5 million per year for five years to establish what is hoped will become a leading research hub for nanomaterials science and technology.

Emmanuel Giannelis, Cornell's Walter R. Read Professor of Engineering and chair of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Lynden Archer, the M.L. Hart Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, will be co-directors of CU-KAUST.

The partnership will focus on a new class of hybrid nanomaterials recently discovered at Cornell. Termed nanoparticle ionic materials (NIMs), they hold potential for applications in emerging technologies for water desalination, carbon capture and solar energy.

KAUST, a research university whose core campus will be located on the Red Sea at Thuwal, is scheduled to open in September 2009. The $25 million award to Cornell will help create one of four KAUST centers for science research through the Saudi university's Global Research Partnership program. KAUST Centers at Oxford, Stanford and Texas A&M University will focus on applied mathematics, photovoltaics and computer science.

Both Cornell researchers have worked for several years to promote NIMs research, and they say the center will give the field a major boost.

"A center of this magnitude will accelerate the research and put it into the public domain," Giannelis said.

Cornell officials also will support development of KAUST's proposed KAUST Nanoscale Facility, drawing on past success with the Cornell NanoScale Science and Technology Facility. They also will provide advice on curriculum and faculty development at KAUST.

For more information, visit http://www.kaust.edu.sa.
What are NIMs?

The materials that Cornell scientists will be researching in the new CU-KAUST center have the characteristics of both liquids and solids.

They are called nanoparticle-based ionic materials (NIMs), and they are a new class of hybrid nanomaterials, meaning they are both organic and inorganic.

First developed at Cornell, they are believed to hold potential for applications in water desalination, carbon capture and solar energy.

NIMs are made by mixing nanoparticles with polymers. The resulting hybrid material maintains the structural integrity of the nanoparticles yet is liquid at temperatures well below the melting temperature of either the polymer or the nanoparticle.

Nanoparticles and nanostructures already transformed by Cornell scientists include silicon dioxide, titanium dioxide and fullerenes. These new materials undergo reversible phase changes, are able to form solutions with other liquids and act as solvents. They also flow smoothly, as viscosity changes with room temperature.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,405 Posts
KAUST supercomputer lures top researchers

By Asma Al-Sharif
JEDDAH – The King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) will house one of the world’s largest supercomputers and it is helping lure top world researchers.
The KAUST is due to open next year on the Red Sea coast near Jeddah. Inside the campus, male and female students will be able to mingle freely, contrary to strict gender segregation enforced in most of the country. The university is part of a series of reforms by King Abdullah aiming to open the country up.
“The supercomputer is the cornerstone of this knowledge-based economy that we are seeking,” said Majid Al-Ghaslan, in charge of the acquisition, design and development of the “Shaheen” supercomputer.
Named after the peregrine falcon, which reaches speeds of up to 340 km per hour, Shaheen is expected to reach 222 teraflops, a measure equalling a trillion floating point operations per second, Ghaslan said. This will make it sixth most powerful computer in the world. Shaheen will be able to simulate the Red Sea environment and model oil fields in three dimensions.
“KAUST is a remarkable addition to the world’s resources in high-end computing,” said David Keyes, Chair of the Mathematical and Computer Sciences and Engineering Division, who is moving from Columbia University. “The machine that is being purchased here is one of the main attractions to me,” he said.
The supercomputer will be used by KAUST and its partners including Cornell University, the University of Oxford, Stanford University, and Texas A&M University. – Reuters

source:saudigazette
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top