SkyscraperCity banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,286 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Kazanlak

The city of Roses, is the best place to stay if you want to visit the Valley of Roses- Rosovata Dolina. it's a clean quiet town, that boomed during the 70s as it was favored among the commie govt, and people flocked from the villages to the city where many factories were built. and most of all the Arsenal. Now however the city still struggles to get out of the economic collapse, as the industries closed down, and there is high unemployment. But now with the recent interest in the Thracian treasures and the Rose Valley, tourism is booming, so they're opting on promoting the city as the gate to the Valley of the Kings.
as I said, it is full of Thracian ruins and treasures, but now the state finally understood how precious they are, and is trying to close all the tombs they can find to the public.
a little intro from some site on the net:
It is called "the town of roses". The air here bears the fragrance of flowers. The vicinity of the town has been turned into wonderful rich gardens where the world famous roses for extractng rose oil are grown. At a distance of 5km from the town there are mineral springs. Not far away is situated the Kazanlak tomb which is included in the list UNESCO.
and even more in english:
http://bulgaria.domino.bg/kazanlak/
The first settlement sprang here in ancient times. The material culture of its inhabitants was manifested as early as the New Stone Age (Neolithic) - 6th - 5th centuries B.C. During the 4th through the 3rd centuries B.C. the lands on the upper course of the Tundzha river were a part of the area ruled by the Thracian King Seuthes III and took an important role in the Thracian history during the Hellenistic times. During the construction of Koprinka Dam the Thracian town of Seuthoplis was completely excavated, preserved and researched. The researches show that the area was inhabited by a large Thracian population, which reached the height of its cultural development during the 5th - 3rd centuries B.C.
In the Middle Ages the valley became administrative centre of Kran region, ruled by the Bulgarian boyar Eltimir. In 1837 Kazanlak region fell under the Ottomans.

During the first decades the town was a military fortress but later on more than 50 crafts developed here - leather-working, coppersmith's and goldsmith's trade, homespun tailoring, shoemaking, cooperage and of course, rose-oil manufacture. In the 1270, during the crusades, Count de Gruye brought the Damascus rose from Syria to the valley at the foot of the Balkan Range where conditions proved excellent. The temperatures in February, when roses bud, are ideal. The blossoms are picked in May and June, when high humidity is very important. So is the cinnamon-forest soil in the area. The first store house, run by the rose merchant Doncho Papazov was established in 1820. Since the 19th century Kazanlak has been the centre of Bulgarian rose-growing and rose-oil manufacture. The attar of rose from Kazanlak won gold medals at exhibitions in Paris, London, Philadelphia, Antwerpen, Milan.

During the Russian-Turkish Liberation war (1877-78) Kazanlak region was a centre of the heroic battles led by the Bulgarian volunteer forces and the Russian troops in 1878 during the Russian-Turkish War of Liberation - 1877/78.

After the liberation from the Ottomans the textile industry experienced a rapid development. The modern textile company named Rozova Dolina was established as a spinning factory by the Stainovi brothers as early as 1890. Kaprony company (aircraft industry) and Arsenal Munitions Works (1924) conquered good positions at the market.

Kazanlak had an important role in Bulgarian economy after the Second World War. Hydraulics and pneumatics, arms industry, food industry, textile industry, essential-oil bearing plants, perfumery, and cosmetics experienced rapid development.

Kazanlak has strong cultural and educational traditions. In 1836 Neofit Bozveli introduced the mutual method of teaching at monastery schools (e.g. older students instructed younger ones); the first school was established in 1860; Iskra chitalishte (reading club) was opened in 1973. Chitalishtes or reading clubs sprang up in nearly every town and village and provided the community with a venue for the arts, culture and public education. In 1883 Pedagogue School of Kazanlak was opened and created an army of well educated teachers for the whole country. Kazanlak is known as the native town of many artists and actors of national importance - Porfirii Velkov, Mara Penkova, Todor Mazarov, Stefan Getsov, Luna Davidova, Lyubomir Kabakchiev, Vidin Daskalov and others.

Now, here are pics I found from Kazanlak.com. first I wanted to make a Buzludja thread, but then decided to focus on the city and the surroundings first
the problem is that the site takes a long time to load, so I'm gonna do this à la Mila ;)


The Koprinka Dam

The Thracian Tomb


==========================
- -
- -
==========================





The Valley of Roses:

 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,286 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
well it is, though I forgot to mention, there are commieblocks there too ;)
it's just they're on the outskirts of the city (70000h).
However the panorama, when seen from the Stara Planina mountains is pretty flat but with tall chimneys beyond the town and in the background the Black Forest 'mountains'. we can call them hills actually.
and sleepy as you said, nothing much to do, except the Rose Festival, which is a great celebration for the whole town and a rose parade
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
nice, especially in May. but ot's a pitty, it's an example of how if a small city is heavily dependent on some big factory, it can be in deep shit when the factory is in crisis. Arsenal was HUGE, about 10K emplyees I think. now they are less than 1000
it produces the infamous AK48 kal6nikov, that's what I'll always associate Kazanlak with.

iska6 li edin mnogo svez link za buzludja, ima qki snimki na pametnika, mai edinstvenite v neta... az sum gi postval tuka, no ne pre4i pak da gi natrapim
eto http://www.geocities.com/lim_medium/Kartinki/Snimki/ ;)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
29,118 Posts


Looks like Bahchisarai in Crimea :)

And those girls, that's what Bulgarians look like?
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top