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roads & rail are getting attention and investment. The next fight is airports, especially JKIA.:guns1:
 

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èđđeůx;81902584 said:
roads & rail are getting attention and investment. The next fight is airports, especially JKIA.:guns1:
The only two things Kenya can really invest in are its infrastructure and its people. Those are its two main advantages on the continent, a strategic location smack in the middle of a vibrant region and a comparatively significant human resource base, to make it succeed in future.
 

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I agree with you fully. Developing infrastructure (roads, railroads, airports and utilities) opens up whatever limited resources that we have. Kibaki's free primary education was a welcome step that should be followed by free secondary education. Coupled with these should be a thorough revamping of the university system to make it easier for more students to access a university education. I attended a university that has less facilities than the university of Nairobi yet it is able to accomodate 30,000 students. An educated population is likely to be more resourceful than one that is not.


The only two things Kenya can really invest in are its infrastructure and its people. Those are its two main advantages on the continent, a strategic location smack in the middle of a vibrant region and a comparatively significant human resource base, to make it succeed in future.
 

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Rift Valley funding​

08 September 2011



AFRICA: A US$165m package of funding towards a US$287m five-year programme of capital investment in the railway linking the Kenyan port of Mombasa to the Ugandan capital Kampala was signed by Rift Valley Railways, the two governments, six development organisations and a local bank on August 4.

Now owned by Citadel Capital of Egypt (51%), TransCentury of Kenya (34%) and Bomi Holdings of Uganda (15%), RVR operates the 2350 km network under a 25-year concession signed in 2006. A joint statement from the governments after the signing of the funding agreement said they were ‘happy to report that RVR has shown commitment in meeting its obligations and improving rail services in the two countries.’

The plan to invest in passing loops and track maintenance, locomotive reliability, workshop modernisation and wagon upgrading and acquisitions has been developed in conjunction with América Latina Logística. It aims to lower shipping costs and cut transit times with a view to growing rail’s share of the freight market from the current 10%, increasing traffic from 1·5 million tonnes/year to 5 million tonnes by 2015.

Our rehabilitation programme, which we kick-started in November 2010, has already delivered impressive early results,’ said RVR Group CEO Brown Ondego. Net tonne-km in the first half of 2011 was up 9% from the same period in 2010, while turnaround times on the strategic Mombasa – Kampala route dropped 27%, improving asset utilisation
http://www.railwaygazette.com/nc/news/single-view/view/rift-valley-funding.html
 

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Kenya Railways Sh3.2 billion slum upgrade starts Jan
http://www.businessdailyafrica.com/...ts+Jan/-/539550/1272486/-/9n6wul/-/index.html

Kenya Railways will start the Sh3.2 billion Kibera and Mukuru slum upgrade and relocation project in January to improve the safety of the Kenya-Uganda rail line and boost train speeds.

The project will see the rail firm secure a 60-metre reserve on the rail line sitting on the twin slums that will displace 9,000 families who reside or carry out business on the reserve.


The families will be accommodated in 3,192 single-room units that will act as homes and trading stalls that will be restricted from the rail line by nine metre high boundary wall that will run on both sides of the rail track.

Besides creating a clear route for the railway, the World Bank-funded relocation plan will compliment ongoing government efforts to upgrade slums by improving housing and sewerage conditions.

The works are expected to start in January 2012. We want to facilitate use of faster trains and improve the safety of both rail and the slum dwellers,” said Kenya Railways Managing Director Nduva Muli. “Trains can only move through the area at low speed, which causes inordinate delays. It will be essential that it increases operational speeds throughout the railway system since the concessionaire expects to improve freight carriage.” Kenya Railways has sought permission from the environmental watchdog Nema to kick off the works that will boost the turnaround efforts of Rift Valley Railways, which won the concession to operate freight and passenger services on the Kenya-Uganda railway for 25 and five year respectively in 2006.

RVR has secured Sh16 billion from a consortium of lenders to revamp 100 locomotives, 3,500 wagons and the rail track that stretches from Mombasa to Kampala that will make the concessionaire meet the expectations of both Kenya and Uganda government and record profits.

While cargo volume at the port of Mombasa has shot up to over 19 million tonnes as at the end of last year from seven million tonnes in the 1980s, volumes transported by RVR have declined from 4.8 million tonnes to 1.5 million tonnes in the same period of time.

Kenya Railways said the encroachment of the rail reserve has hurt the performance of RVR by slowing down trucks and reducing the stability of the rail track.

It also plans to roll-out new and faster metro train services by 2013 to decongest the city motor traffic—making the relocation efforts a critical plank of the planned mega rail infrastructure projects. Details on the Environmental Impact Assessment report presented to Nema early this month show a slum upgrade plan that is different from what the government has done before.

Previously, the government has built two and three bedroomed houses to relocate slum dwellers used to leaving in one roomed shacks with no toilets, and the bulk of the houses ended up benefiting the middle-class.

Piped water

The Kenya Railways upgrade will build 3,129 single roomed houses measuring 20 metres by 20 metres of which 1, 490 will be residential units comprising a kitchen, a sleeping area and a toilet on the upper floor of the two-floor structures. The lower structure will sit 1,539 trading stalls of the same measure that will be subdivide into three units—which means that will 4617 businesses that Kenya Railways says will change the way business is done in the targeted slums. The units will be connected with piped water and to the national electricity grid.

The boundary wall will run for 12.3km with 5.3km covering the track on Kibera and seven kilometres on the Makadara- Embakasi section.

The project comes at a time when Kenya Railways is preparing to launch a commuter rail services within Nairobi Metropolitan by 2013 as part of plan that will see the model replicated in Kisumu and Mombasa as well as their surrounding counties at a cost of Sh256 billion. It plans to build a total of ten new stations including the ongoing construction of the Syokimau Station and upgrade the existing railway.
 

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US firm signs deal to repair Kenya trains
http://www.nation.co.ke/business/ne...ains++/-/1006/1415508/-/14ano44z/-/index.html

US business firm General Electric has secured an agreement with Kenya to repair train locomotives and aircraft.

The memorandum will also see the company provide technical expertise to Kenyans.

This comes five months after the US firm set up a regional office in Nairobi.

“We want to get expertise in repairing some of these complex machines and other sophisticated tools as we seek to industrialise,” Vision 2030 secretariat director Mugo Kibati said.

He added that this would be an opportunity for Numerical Machining Complex (NMC), the government technical training centre, to upgrade and start using some of the facilities that have hitherto been under utilised for lack of specialised training.

He said NMC has facilities only comparable to South Africa and if well utilised, Kenya would soon start producing spare parts for various machines.
 

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I would have preferred to see a Japanese or European company on this project, but it's still good.
Actually GE Transportation (GE's railroad manufacturing division) is quite involved in the rail industry. It dominates the North American market for diesel-electric locomotives, and produces signaling equipment, parts for locomotives, and even has a hybrid diesel-electric in the making. So I think it's a good choice that Kenya will definitely benefit from greatly.:yes:
 

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èđđeůx;91898293 said:
Actually GE Transportation (GE's railroad manufacturing division) is quite involved in the rail industry. It dominates the North American market for diesel-electric locomotives, and produces signaling equipment, parts for locomotives, and even has a hybrid diesel-electric in the making. So I think it's a good choice that Kenya will definitely benefit from greatly.:yes:
I am probably biased since I worked in that sector some time back, European companies are simply top notch when it comes to that.
 

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MD Mainga drives railway growth and revival
RAIL REVIVAL

His focus then shifted to what is set to become one of the government’s great revival projects – resurrecting the country’s expansive railway operations that had remained dormant for more than two decades.

This includes restoring and refurbishing the old railway line between Naivasha and Malaba, as well as linking it with the SGR.

This will ensure a seamless rail system for both passengers and cargo between Mombasa and Malaba. The initiative is expected to stimulate the economy as well as ease cargo movement to neighbouring landlocked countries using the Port of Mombasa.

Mainga has recalled more than 2,000 former Kenya Railways employees to help.

He is currently overseeing construction of a metre gauge railway from Naivasha to Longonot, to be connected to the SGR. “The line is almost 60 per cent complete,” Mainga said.


Rehabilitation works are also underway on the Nakuru-Kisumu stretch.

“By April or May next year, Kenya Railways will have connected the SGR from Mombasa all way to Malaba where we will have a seamless operational train,” the MD said.

The line is expected to increase agricultural exports such as tea and coffee. It will also serve factories in Rift Valley and western Kenya and the fish industry in Kisumu, with ripple effects across the economy.
He is also focused on reviving railway lines in Butere, Eldoret, Kitale and the Voi-Taveta line to increase cargo movement between Kenya and Tanzania through the Taveta-Holili border.

KRC refurbished the Nairobi-Nanyuki line where it is running two to three cargo trains.

Passenger operations have also started with two trains a week. The project will expand the Central Kenya economy, mainly in agriculture and tourism.

Mainga has given expensive contractors a wide berth, ensuring refurbishment of these railway lines is achieved at minimal cost.

For instance, for the Nairobi-Nanyuki line, the contractor had quoted Sh18 billion but was done with Sh1.8 billion.

The Kisumu route was quoted at Sh20 billion but KRC, using its internal engineers and local labour, is refurbishing it for about Sh3 billion.
Within a year, KRC has rehabilitated more than 800km of rail.

“By June 2021, we will have only a few linkages remaining, according to the master plan.

“I have almost fully integrated the rail network within the country that will spur economic growth and movement of people in a cheaper, efficient and safe way,” Mainga said.

Plans are also underway to develop a Railway City within Nairobi Station that will include government offices, parking silos, office blocks and commercial centres.

“We have a master plan,” Mainga said. “We have received about 60 bidders for the Railway City from both local and foreign investors.”
While there is no journey without challenges, one of Mainga’s uphill tasks was taking back the metre gauge railway operations from Rift Valley Railways. He started the move when he was in charge of business and operations.

It saw KRC resume operations on the 100-year-old line, with all the workers from RVR transferred to the corporation.

“That was one of the biggest challenges,” Mainga said. “It was a government asset that was being mismanaged and misused and we had to get it back,” he said.

“It is one of the best things when I look back. I enjoy it because there is nothing like seeing a government asset being revived and bringing back employment and investments that were lost in different parts of this country.”
My Favorite Part from the article:
Mainga is also overseeing the gradual taking over of SGR operations by Kenyans from the Chinese, expected to be completed in 2022.
Continued here: MD Mainga drives railway growth and revival

SGR expansion is one thing, but as @Kenguy and @ewangai stated above, there has been an increased revitalization and utilization of rail as a viable mode of transportation countrywide. Props to MD Mainga and his team for facilitating this in just 3 years time 🍻🥂
 

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Looking at the reopening of schools, it got me thinking that KR should have been the main mode of back to school transport for roughly 60% of boarding institutions in this country. Most of the older and larger schools were built along or within a 20 km radius of the railway lines during the colonial period. Infact this was the main mode of transport for majority of students until the 60s and 70s reporting to boarding school with pupils as far as Uganda using the train services. They should partner with individual institutions to reduce rates for kids and take back their rightful position as the choice mode of transport for these pupils.
 

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It's interesting watching the revamping of our rail system. We let a good infrastructure go to waste for many years and it is encouraging to see things come back. It's obvious that there is a demand for rail services, both cargo and passenger. Indeed, most students travelled by rail to and from boarding schools, and I was one of them. I recall riding the train through Turi and watching St. Andrew's students boarding their own special train. Some schools, like St. Andrew's, would hire trains to ferry their students to and from Uganda and even Tanzania.

Looking at the reopening of schools, it got me thinking that KR should have been the main mode of back to school transport for roughly 60% of boarding institutions in this country. Most of the older and larger schools were built along or within a 20 km radius of the railway lines during the colonial period. Infact this was the main mode of transport for majority of students until the 60s and 70s reporting to boarding school with pupils as far as Uganda using the train services. They should partner with individual institutions to reduce rates for kids and take back their rightful position as the choice mode of transport for these pupils.
 

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It's interesting watching the revamping of our rail system. We let a good infrastructure go to waste for many years and it is encouraging to see things come back. It's obvious that there is a demand for rail services, both cargo and passenger. Indeed, most students travelled by rail to and from boarding schools, and I was one of them. I recall riding the train through Turi and watching St. Andrew's students boarding their own special train. Some schools, like St. Andrew's, would hire trains to ferry their students to and from Uganda and even Tanzania.
Nowadays students at St Andrews Turi fly into school with choppers and small charter planes.
 
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