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Discussion Starter #361 (Edited)
Hi,

I am deciding between purchasing a one-bedder in either Saffron Square or Kidbrooke Village (SE3). The link for Saffron Square (Croydon) is
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=520683&page=8

Like to hear from you guys which is the better choice in terms of location.

Thanks

The two neighbourhoods are very different in character. Saffron Square is located in the middle of Croydon which is a busy, bustling commercial centre. Kidbrooke Village is a residential area, vastly different in nature. Personally I'd rather live in Kidbrooke, but I'm biased as I'm more familiar with south-east London (boroughs of Southwark, Lewisham and Greenwich) than anywhere else in the city.

Some other location-related criteria:


Postcode desirability

Croydon property:
- Address: Croydon, Surrey, CR0
- Borough: London Borough of Croydon
- Average house price in CR0: £234,713

Kidbrooke property:
- Address: Kidbrooke, London, SE3
- Borough: Royal Borough of Greenwich
- Average house price in SE3: £415,798

SE3 is more prestigious; partly because it's shared with Blackheath. Greenwich has lower council tax than Croydon across all bands. House prices in Croydon are currently low, leaving good potential for future increases.



Distance from centre of London

Croydon property:
- 14.9km from centre of London
- Zone 5

Kidbrooke property:
- 11.8km from centre of London
- Zone 3

Kidbrooke Village is closer to London (two zones closer, cheaper commuter fares).



Commuting times (public transport, rush hour)

Croydon property:
- 16 minutes to London Bridge (for the City)
- 20 minutes to London Victoria (for the West End)
- 33 minutes to Canary Wharf.

Kidbrooke property:
- 16 minutes to London Bridge (for the City)
- 23 minutes to London Charing Cross (for the West End)
- 33 minutes to Canary Wharf

Travel times are similar, but Croydon has more public transport options (when you consider the number of rail lines, buses and trams). Both attractive for commuting.
 

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Hi,

I am deciding between purchasing a one-bedder in either Saffron Square or Kidbrooke Village (SE3). The link for Saffron Square (Croydon) is
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=520683&page=8

Like to hear from you guys which is the better choice in terms of location.

Thanks
One thing you should also bear in mind is the 'investment potential' of each area, I can't speak for Kidbrooke, but Croydon house prices at the moment are very low, considering it's fantastic connections, and the area is in line for a huge level of investment. Don't forget that the new Westfield/Hammerson development is almost directly opposite Saffron Square, and this along with other huge improvements currently taking place in Croydon should mean that property prices in the area should in theory skyrocket in the future.
 

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Discussion Starter #364
The Meridian Gate and Blackheath Quarter phases are both under construction.

The City Point phase is complete apart from some landscaping and internal fitting.


Kidbrooke Village, London by SE9 London, on Flickr


Kidbrooke Village, London by SE9 London, on Flickr


Kidbrooke Village, London by SE9 London, on Flickr


Kidbrooke Village, London by SE9 London, on Flickr


Kidbrooke Village, London by SE9 London, on Flickr


Kidbrooke Village, London by SE9 London, on Flickr


Kidbrooke Village, London by SE9 London, on Flickr


Kidbrooke Village, London by SE9 London, on Flickr


Kidbrooke Village, London by SE9 London, on Flickr


Kidbrooke Village, London by SE9 London, on Flickr


Kidbrooke Village, London by SE9 London, on Flickr


Kidbrooke Village, London by SE9 London, on Flickr
 

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I think this massive project is fantastic...the vary composition of massing, materials is excellent. I particularly like the terraced pitched roof housing. :)
 

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A lot of these buildings without the landscaping and instead positioned in a typical concrete jungle English town would look awful. The green surroundings help a lot.
 

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Discussion Starter #368
Saying that these buildings in an urban jungle layout would look awful is akin to me saying the Leadenhall Building situated in Prague's old town would look awful. Perhaps that's true, but buildings are designed with a consideration for the local context, so they should be judged by how they interact with their real surroundings.
 

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Just found this thread... what an utter delight. Judging by some of the cars visible, we can safely say this hasn't turned into a council estate ghetto. As for the people who moved from the Ferrier into one of those lovely new homes, the impact on them will (hopefully) be tremendous.
Bravo to this.
 

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While I like this development there are some issues I have with the wood that looks synthetic and used probably too much as a 'softening' material on the facades.
 

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Just found this thread... what an utter delight. Judging by some of the cars visible, we can safely say this hasn't turned into a council estate ghetto. As for the people who moved from the Ferrier into one of those lovely new homes, the impact on them will (hopefully) be tremendous.
Bravo to this.
You havn't been to many SE London estates if you think having nice cars present show it isn't a council estate. On the contrary the more 'middle class' an area is with 'working professionals' the less likely there is to have more expensive cars, particularly large engined vehicles. That is because many 'poor' parents in estates receive tax credits for part time work, and these benefits pay far more than unemployment benefit do despite what the tabloids say - a look on the governments own tax credit calculator online will cause some eyes to pop at the amounts. It's a substantial amount of the welfare total. Not knocking them for that - good luck to them that is the way things are! All the estates I frequent have many large German v8 cars - almost always from houses with families on working and child tax credits. A lot of the time it's full time workers without kids paying full market rents who cannot afford anything bigger than a supermini. A walk through the estates and areas of high social housing will show this clearly, but if feeling lazy a google street view shows it too. It's an interesting social and economic phenomenon revealing a lot about Britain today.

As for the pics - great work and the place looks great. I hope maintenance is sustained. Even the Ferrier looked good when it was built (check the pics on flickr from one of the original GLC architects to see)
 

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You havn't been to many SE London estates if you think having nice cars present show it isn't a council estate. On the contrary the more 'middle class' an area is with 'working professionals' the less likely there is to have more expensive cars, particularly large engined vehicles. That is because many 'poor' parents in estates receive tax credits for part time work, and these benefits pay far more than unemployment benefit do despite what the tabloids say - a look on the governments own tax credit calculator online will cause some eyes to pop at the amounts. It's a substantial amount of the welfare total. Not knocking them for that - good luck to them that is the way things are! All the estates I frequent have many large German v8 cars - almost always from houses with families on working and child tax credits. A lot of the time it's full time workers without kids paying full market rents who cannot afford anything bigger than a supermini. A walk through the estates and areas of high social housing will show this clearly, but if feeling lazy a google street view shows it too. It's an interesting social and economic phenomenon revealing a lot about Britain today.

As for the pics - great work and the place looks great. I hope maintenance is sustained. Even the Ferrier looked good when it was built (check the pics on flickr from one of the original GLC architects to see)
This is true, very true. I went for a walk around here yesterday - it feels wonderful. A couple of people looked a bit dodgy but all the houses seem really well looked after and there's no scruffy bits yet. I assume that when the social housing clients moved in there must have been a rule prohibiting any action which could negatively affect the look of the buildings/gardens or maybe they're turning over a new leaf.
The new towers look particularly lovely.
 

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Discussion Starter #378
Some basic info on the Sutcliffe Park redevelopment:


Sutcliffe Park before redevelopment

- Sutcliffe Park was a flat grass field used for football pitches.

- The local river (the Quaggy) ran underneath the park in concrete tunnels.

- During heavy rain, this posed a flood risk to houses by the river downstream, as the river would emerge from the culverts at great speed.






Sutcliffe Park during redevelopment

- The park was closed. The football moved elsewhere.

- The river's course was recreated above ground.

- The culverts were removed, allowing the river to flow above ground for the first time in decades.






Sutcliffe Park after redevelopment

- Sutcliffe Park is now named Sutcliffe Nature Reserve.

- The River Quaggy runs above ground, with two lakes created in the park.

- The park acts as a flood plain. In heavy rain, the river will flood the planted marsh area.



Sutcliffe Park - Kidbrooke Village, London by SE9 London, on Flickr
 
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