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love the Bluestone.
ta collector
 

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Wonderful shots. Melbourne is the goods!!

Bravo :cheers:
 

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I like King Street because I never have to go there. Thanks for the photos Collector.
 

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Great job again Collector: looking forward to Spencer St!

Someone on this forum recently identified King Street as the main north-south street in Melbourne: it probably carries more traffic (discounting trams) than any other north-south street, but it isn't the north-south axis of the city.

The classic iconic building in King St. is the former Wool Exchange: I must confess most of my King St. photos seem to feature this building.



At the corner of Lonsdale Street:



At the corner of Collins Street:



A view across King St: I got apprehended while photographing this building:



The Stock Exchange overshadows the former Wool Exchange, and the tallest building in Melbourne north of the Yarra still casts its shadow for much of the day on King Street: although the right-hand photo is not quite in King Street:



A challenge here is to identify which street anything belongs to: The Rialto and the ASX arguably belong as much to King Street as to Collins Street (especially if you get out a tape measure) but most skyscrapers in Melbourne are identified by their east-west street, if they happen to fall upon a corner. Too bad for King Street about Bourke Place!
I guess the Rialto's shadow barely lifts down here at all.

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Text from Melbourne Architecture

St. James Old Cathedral
419-435 King Street (originally in Collins Street west)
1839-51 Robert Russell; 1841 Charles Laing; 1913 relocated to King Street

St James Anglican Church originally stood in Collins Street, on a large site bounded by William and Little Collins Streets. The church’s popularity waned as the Gothic Revival progressed and, whether from ecclesiastical prejudice or structural uncertainty, was deemed unsafe. When it was closed in 1912, pioneers rallied to save the church by having it moved and rebuilt on its present site. It is the first Anglican church and the only surviving example of a once much-used local sandstone quarried from the south side of the Yarra, and an example of inter-colonial architectural influence-Robert Russell, the designer, drew on the work of Francis Greenway in Sydney. Russell was succeeded by Charles Laing, who added the side porches, a tall octagonal tower above Russell’s square tower and the remarkable ‘east’ end (now the north end, as the church was turned 90˚ when it was relocated), which has been claimed to be based on the entrance to Robert Adam’s Edinburgh University. The antique character of Old St James’ was maintained after its rebuilding with some significant changes: the two-stage square tower has been raised to three stages and the blind windows changed from two to three; of the tall, two stage octagonal tower, only the upper part was reproduced.

Three photographs I’ve taken recently.





 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Long ago and hard to believe now, the two paintings below are of Frederick McCubbin’s father’s bakery at 165 King Street.
Remind me of something I once saw at Beechworth.


Frederick McCubbin
Kitchen at the old King Street bakery, 1884



Frederick McCubbin
Girl with a bird at the King Street bakery, 1886
 
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