Skyscraper City Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·

Highett’s main shopping strip has received the Mainstreet Australia Mainstreet Activation award, recognising its transformation to a vibrant hub of shopping, living and activity. Developed by Accord Property Group, Vantage Highett mixed-use development, located on the corner of Highett and Graham Roads in Melbourne, opened in mid 2013 and represents a new type of development for this part of Melbourne. The mixed-use development comprises 130 apartments and 6,000 square metres of retail space, combining a Woolworths and retail tenancies at ground level, with one and two bedroom apartments above. ClarkeHopkinsClarke architect Toby Lauchlan said the rejuvenated streetscape is at the forefront of its kind.

“For ClarkeHopkinsClarke rejuvenating streetscapes which are often seen in disrepair in suburban Melbourne, is about creating vibrant communities and injecting much needed life through design,” Mr Lauchlan said. “We set the bar high on all of our work and liaise closely with the community to deliver a shared vision and we’re glad the UDIA and Mainstreet Australia judges both recognize our collaborative efforts have helped transform another community.” Mr Lauchlan worked with local community, retailers and the developer to help bring to life this prominent site. While the site had remained vacant for years it has a rich history of use including being a market garden in the 1920s and 1930s. “By providing a welcoming and accessible retail hub for the local community, creating a vibrant and socially activated mall and streetscape, we reinvigorated local commercial opportunities,” said Mr Lauchlan.

According to Mr Lauchlan approximately 140 full time, part time and casual jobs have been generated since the center opened. “Another positive flow-on affect is the overall safety and security of residents accessing the train station and the retail strip at various times of the day,” he said. He said Highett’s mixed-use development illustrates that it is possible to strike a balance between metro and local planning objectives. “The site once had old warehouses where planes were built in the war and we now see a strip of award winning urban design,” Mr Lauchlan said. Scott McVilly, Managing Director at Accord Property Group, said that “the residences have proven to be highly marketable and sold quickly off the plan with 120 of the 130 apartments sold prior to completion.” “Since the opening of the site the supermarket has traded strongly and the retail tenancies are able to demand higher rents than originally estimated,” said James Weight, Regional Development Manager at Woolworths.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
266 Posts
Holy thread bump batman.

Come for the [transport] construction pr0n, stay for the increasingly higher-density vistas - well at lot has changed since the thread was created 6 years ago.


There are ~25 projects in Cheltenham of varying sizes.
Oh yeah! Cheltenham has been fun to watch over the last few years with the projects, now with the train line going under I will never tell going past!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,869 Posts
Bid to create new village on old CSIRO land at Highett
1920186

More than 1000 houses, a public library and large community park are set to transform an old research site in Melbourne’s south.

Developer Sunkin Property Group wants to create Park Village Highett on the former CSIRO site at 37 Graham Road and 32 Middleton Street.

The proposal for the 9.3ha site includes a mix of 1048 townhouses, apartments and loft style dwellings across 14 residential complexes ranging in height from two to seven stories.
1920187

About 1ha of open space would be set aside for recreation while 3ha — which encompasses the Highett Grassy Woodland — would be saved for conservation under an agreement with Bayside Council.

Community facilities including a council-run library and retail space were also part of the plan.

The Park Village Highett proposal has been lodged with Bayside Council and locals were encouraged to provide feedback before the plan was considered in October.

Fred Ericks said Highett was already “extremely congested” by traffic and pedestrians from existing apartments.

“I have lived in this area for circa 25 years. And even now without this new development the area is so hard to navigate due to the congested state it’s in,” he said.

Mr Ericks called for more appropriate town planning and infrastructure assessments instead of “building more and more apartments”.

Another local was worried about further congestion at nearby level crossings at Highett and Wickham roads and called for Highett Station to be revamped.

Kai Pratt said the increase in residents living in the suburb would make the crossings “incredibly unsafe”.

“Please lobby the state government to do something about Highett Station and make Highett a wonderfully integrated, safe community for existing and new residents,” he said.

A council spokesperson said Bayside was already advocating for the removal of both crossings.

The Federal Government announced its plan to close its Highett research hub in 2011, and the CSIRO subsequently demolished all buildings and remediated the land to remove any potentially hazardous materials.

-HUN
 

·
Agent of Change
Joined
·
7,435 Posts
Pellicano taps suburban vibe in Common Grounds

Nick Lenaghan
Property editor
Oct 13, 2021 – 6.15pm

Private developer Pellicano will push ahead on a $260 million mixed-use hub in Melbourne’s south-east, tapping into a growing enthusiasm for suburban office destinations.

With planning approval already in hand, Pellicano is confident enough to launch demolition and plan to begin construction in February, before even locking in tenants pre-commitments.

On Chesterville Road in Moorabbin, the Common Grounds project will deliver 35,000 sq m of space, the bulk of it in five office towers that will incorporate co-working spaces. Some 2000 sq m of retail space is planned.

“Last year’s shift towards work-from-home also drove a simultaneous change in the needs of commercial tenants and employees, away from the CBD and with a focus on amenities like green space, wellness facilities and first-class end-of-trip offerings,” managing director Nando Pellicano said.

“That’s what the workforce has become more accustomed to.”

Designed by FJMT Studio, the Moorabbin hub will stretch across a 3.14 hectare site and will have a lifestyle theme running through it. A standalone 400 sq m wellness studio is part of the plan, as well as a food and beverage precinct around an outdoor courtyard.

In all, green space and parkland will account for 40 per cent of the site. A
basketball court and playground, along with art and community spaces for events are part of the picture, too.

“We think that precincts like Common Grounds hold the key to bringing people back to the office and reinvigorating the surrounding suburbs. By creating lifestyle-led commercial offerings that also contribute to the local area, we think the workforce will respond positively and start opting for on-site over work-from-home,” Mr Pellicano said.

Pellicano is a family-owned developer with a diverse range of projects from residential, to industrial and business parks across Victoria and Queensland.

Among its recent efforts, Pellicano kicked off work on a boutique $46 million build-to-rent project in Brunswick, one of inner-city Melbourne’s best-known hipster suburbs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,336 Posts

Highett’s main shopping strip has received the Mainstreet Australia Mainstreet Activation award, recognising its transformation to a vibrant hub of shopping, living and activity. Developed by Accord Property Group, Vantage Highett mixed-use development, located on the corner of Highett and Graham Roads in Melbourne, opened in mid 2013 and represents a new type of development for this part of Melbourne. The mixed-use development comprises 130 apartments and 6,000 square metres of retail space, combining a Woolworths and retail tenancies at ground level, with one and two bedroom apartments above. ClarkeHopkinsClarke architect Toby Lauchlan said the rejuvenated streetscape is at the forefront of its kind.

“For ClarkeHopkinsClarke rejuvenating streetscapes which are often seen in disrepair in suburban Melbourne, is about creating vibrant communities and injecting much needed life through design,” Mr Lauchlan said. “We set the bar high on all of our work and liaise closely with the community to deliver a shared vision and we’re glad the UDIA and Mainstreet Australia judges both recognize our collaborative efforts have helped transform another community.” Mr Lauchlan worked with local community, retailers and the developer to help bring to life this prominent site. While the site had remained vacant for years it has a rich history of use including being a market garden in the 1920s and 1930s. “By providing a welcoming and accessible retail hub for the local community, creating a vibrant and socially activated mall and streetscape, we reinvigorated local commercial opportunities,” said Mr Lauchlan.

According to Mr Lauchlan approximately 140 full time, part time and casual jobs have been generated since the center opened. “Another positive flow-on affect is the overall safety and security of residents accessing the train station and the retail strip at various times of the day,” he said. He said Highett’s mixed-use development illustrates that it is possible to strike a balance between metro and local planning objectives. “The site once had old warehouses where planes were built in the war and we now see a strip of award winning urban design,” Mr Lauchlan said. Scott McVilly, Managing Director at Accord Property Group, said that “the residences have proven to be highly marketable and sold quickly off the plan with 120 of the 130 apartments sold prior to completion.” “Since the opening of the site the supermarket has traded strongly and the retail tenancies are able to demand higher rents than originally estimated,” said James Weight, Regional Development Manager at Woolworths.
Interesting as the Highett Shopping strip was a real run down dump not that long back!
 

·
Agent of Change
Joined
·
7,435 Posts
Lol @ calling 7-storeys towers. I also abhor when parents force their children to partake in their crusade for a newspaper photo op. They're only their because mummy and daddy said the bad people are gonna build towers.

SOme of these claims are laughable and reek of entitlement - if they love it so much why are they concerned about their property values? Surely it's not because they eventually want to sell up.

Residents claim tower plan for CSIRO site will destroy Highett

Residents claim seven-storey towers with more than 1000 apartments would turn their area “the most unliveable suburb in Melbourne’’.

Peter Rolfe

2 min read
October 25, 2021 - 8:02AM
Highett residents are protesting a new housing development. Picture: Mark Stewart

Highett residents are protesting a new housing development. Picture: Mark Stewart

Plans for towers up to seven storeys and more than 1000 flats on former CSIRO land in bayside Melbourne have angered locals who say it will destroy their neighbourhood.

Bayside Council will on Tuesday vote on a proposal to build 15 towers on prime Highett land that residents say will make it ‘‘the most unliveable suburb in Melbourne”.

There are more than 760 objections to plans that would add up to 3000 residents and 5000 cars a day to the suburb.

Residents have threatened to take their case to the Independent Broad-based Anti-corruption Commission and the Ombudsman, citing lack of consultation and “unacceptable documentation”.

Plans for the former CSIRO site at Highett.

Plans for the former CSIRO site at Highett.

The area would include more than 1000 apartment, parks and a public library.

The area would include more than 1000 apartment, parks and a public library.

Courtney DeCesare, who lives behind the site, likened ‘‘outlandish overdevelopment” to “commission housing” in its scale and density.

“This is going to be like nothing seen in Bayside … this is double the largest development in Bayside history,” she said.

A total of 1022 flats have been proposed for the towers – from two to seven storeys – as well as new internal roads, a library, shops, nature reserve and public open space.

Developer Sunkin Property Group general manager Lloyd Collins said it would “have a significant positive impact; supporting the local economy, generating new jobs in the area and … new local assets”.

Highett residents are against the proposed development. Picture: Mark Stewart

Highett residents are against the proposed development. Picture: Mark Stewart

“We have had tremendous support from local businesses and the wider community who are keen to see this important derelict site, at the heart of the town centre and train station precinct, brought back to life,” Mr Collins said.

About 2000 construction jobs would be created through the development of the Graham Rd and Middleton St site.

But Ms DeCesare said residents were worried about traffic, their house values and questioned whether the council would allow it to go ahead in cashed-up nearby suburbs such as Brighton or Beaumaris.

“We all want the site to be developed, we just want it to be done in a stable manner and not make Highett the most unliveable city in Melbourne.”

Council planning and amenity director Matthew Cripps said the 9ha site was “one of the few pieces of vacant land in Bayside within close proximity to public transport, shopping and services”.

“Council will consider the proposed development plan in relation to planning controls, as well as feedback from the community,” he said.

Councillors will vote on the development application on Tuesday.

The developer bought the 9.3ha site for $90 million last year, after the CSIRO embarked on a $30 million clean up of the former laboratory.

Residents have raised concerns about traffic reports in the plan but the council said it had them “reviewed by an independent traffic engineer and is still forming its view on the application’’.
 

·
Aesthetics
Joined
·
1,816 Posts
Lol @ calling 7-storeys towers. I also abhor when parents force their children to partake in their crusade for a newspaper photo op. They're only their because mummy and daddy said the bad people are gonna build towers.

SOme of these claims are laughable and reek of entitlement - if they love it so much why are they concerned about their property values? Surely it's not because they eventually want to sell up.

Residents claim tower plan for CSIRO site will destroy Highett

Residents claim seven-storey towers with more than 1000 apartments would turn their area “the most unliveable suburb in Melbourne’’.

Peter Rolfe

2 min read
October 25, 2021 - 8:02AM
Highett residents are protesting a new housing development. Picture: Mark Stewart

Highett residents are protesting a new housing development. Picture: Mark Stewart

Plans for towers up to seven storeys and more than 1000 flats on former CSIRO land in bayside Melbourne have angered locals who say it will destroy their neighbourhood.

Bayside Council will on Tuesday vote on a proposal to build 15 towers on prime Highett land that residents say will make it ‘‘the most unliveable suburb in Melbourne”.

There are more than 760 objections to plans that would add up to 3000 residents and 5000 cars a day to the suburb.

Residents have threatened to take their case to the Independent Broad-based Anti-corruption Commission and the Ombudsman, citing lack of consultation and “unacceptable documentation”.

Plans for the former CSIRO site at Highett.

Plans for the former CSIRO site at Highett.

The area would include more than 1000 apartment, parks and a public library.

The area would include more than 1000 apartment, parks and a public library.

Courtney DeCesare, who lives behind the site, likened ‘‘outlandish overdevelopment” to “commission housing” in its scale and density.

“This is going to be like nothing seen in Bayside … this is double the largest development in Bayside history,” she said.

A total of 1022 flats have been proposed for the towers – from two to seven storeys – as well as new internal roads, a library, shops, nature reserve and public open space.

Developer Sunkin Property Group general manager Lloyd Collins said it would “have a
Lol @ calling 7-storeys towers. I also abhor when parents force their children to partake in their crusade for a newspaper photo op. They're only their because mummy and daddy said the bad people are gonna build towers.

SOme of these claims are laughable and reek of entitlement - if they love it so much why are they concerned about their property values? Surely it's not because they eventually want to sell up.

Residents claim tower plan for CSIRO site will destroy Highett

Residents claim seven-storey towers with more than 1000 apartments would turn their area “the most unliveable suburb in Melbourne’’.

Peter Rolfe

2 min read
October 25, 2021 - 8:02AM
Highett residents are protesting a new housing development. Picture: Mark Stewart

Highett residents are protesting a new housing development. Picture: Mark Stewart

Plans for towers up to seven storeys and more than 1000 flats on former CSIRO land in bayside Melbourne have angered locals who say it will destroy their neighbourhood.

Bayside Council will on Tuesday vote on a proposal to build 15 towers on prime Highett land that residents say will make it ‘‘the most unliveable suburb in Melbourne”.

There are more than 760 objections to plans that would add up to 3000 residents and 5000 cars a day to the suburb.

Residents have threatened to take their case to the Independent Broad-based Anti-corruption Commission and the Ombudsman, citing lack of consultation and “unacceptable documentation”.

Plans for the former CSIRO site at Highett.

Plans for the former CSIRO site at Highett.

The area would include more than 1000 apartment, parks and a public library.

The area would include more than 1000 apartment, parks and a public library.

Courtney DeCesare, who lives behind the site, likened ‘‘outlandish overdevelopment” to “commission housing” in its scale and density.

“This is going to be like nothing seen in Bayside … this is double the largest development in Bayside history,” she said.

A total of 1022 flats have been proposed for the towers – from two to seven storeys – as well as new internal roads, a library, shops, nature reserve and public open space.

Developer Sunkin Property Group general manager Lloyd Collins said it would “have a significant positive impact; supporting the local economy, generating new jobs in the area and … new local assets”.

Highett residents are against the proposed development. Picture: Mark Stewart

Highett residents are against the proposed development. Picture: Mark Stewart

“We have had tremendous support from local businesses and the wider community who are keen to see this important derelict site, at the heart of the town centre and train station precinct, brought back to life,” Mr Collins said.

About 2000 construction jobs would be created through the development of the Graham Rd and Middleton St site.

But Ms DeCesare said residents were worried about traffic, their house values and questioned whether the council would allow it to go ahead in cashed-up nearby suburbs such as Brighton or Beaumaris.

“We all want the site to be developed, we just want it to be done in a stable manner and not make Highett the most unliveable city in Melbourne.”

Council planning and amenity director Matthew Cripps said the 9ha site was “one of the few pieces of vacant land in Bayside within close proximity to public transport, shopping and services”.

“Council will consider the proposed development plan in relation to planning controls, as well as feedback from the community,” he said.

Councillors will vote on the development application on Tuesday.

The developer bought the 9.3ha site for $90 million last year, after the CSIRO embarked on a $30 million clean up of the former laboratory.

Residents have raised concerns about traffic reports in the plan but the council said it had them “reviewed by an independent traffic engineer and is still forming its view on the application’’.
Retarded, selfish lot!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,945 Posts
"The most unliveable suburb in Melbourne" , is the most understated statement they could've come up with ? Surely the World's most depressing future ghetto is far more accurate.
 

·
Aesthetics
Joined
·
1,816 Posts
Granted I haven’t been to Highett for more than a decade however at that time I felt that it was an average suburb (by inner Melbourne standards), with no special appeal whatsoever.
I do not care how special it is by any marketing means or quality of life indicators... it is up to urban planners and government policies to determine the right course of density and height limit...and what is wrong with this example...people in the right mind would accept it...unfortunately I have to agree that having too many local councils, waters down the governing policies of the state governments of the day... Melbourne should have one council and a metropolitan strategy, guided by the state government!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,822 Posts
LOL

Isn't it currently an empty fenced off paddock of overgrown grass that is not accessible to residents?? What is their suggestion or solution for the parcel of land, they are saying NO NO NO, sure so gives us some options and solutions to what they would prefer then? Come on, it can't stay as an empty plot of land for ever.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top