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Correct me if I am wrong, but I believe all the new CCECC projects are standard gauge. Even the Itakpe-Ajaokuta-Warri rail line is Standard Gauge.

I do not believe there are any new rail lines that are narrow gauge in Nigeria (I could be wrong).

The narrow-gauge projects that I am aware of, are rehabilitation. The Eastern and Western lines which were rehabilitated in the past 10 years.
 
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^^correct all new lines are standard gauge.

Not sure why, but for some political reason Nigeria, Kenya and other african countries are switching to Standard gauge even tho they spent billions rehabilitating their narrow gauge rails a few years ago. Either an A.U. or Ecowas initiative, or China wants all of Africa to use standard gauge, since they virtually control the continent.

BTW is there a thread for the new Multi-million dollar ECOWAS headquarters China is building in Abuja.....colonialism 2.0
 

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^^correct all new lines are standard gauge.

Not sure why, but for some political reason Nigeria, Kenya and other african countries are switching to Standard gauge even tho they spent billions rehabilitating their narrow gauge rails a few years ago. Either an A.U. or Ecowas initiative, or China wants all of Africa to use standard gauge, since they virtually control the continent.
It could be because it is the most widely used railway track gauge across the world and there is a lot more choice available for rolling stock, parts, suppliers, etc than for narrow gauge. This means that we could conceivably buy locomotives and coaches from other countries after the tracks are laid.

Weight limits are also higher for standard gauge and some high-speed rail lines also utilise standard gauge.
 

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Doubtful that Nigeria's standard gauge program has anything to do with China since Nigeria apparently decided to embark on standard gauge rail lines over 30 years ago under the administration of Mr. Shagari, when China was still a closed economically-struggling communist country. The Itakpe-Ajaokuta line was the first of those proposed standard gauge lines, and it was awarded to Julius Berger which remains responsible for the civil works/bridges part of that project.
 

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It could be because it is the most widely used railway track gauge across the world and there is a lot more choice available for rolling stock, parts, suppliers, etc than for narrow gauge. This means that we could conceivably buy locomotives and coaches from other countries after the tracks are laid.

Weight limits are also higher for standard gauge and some high-speed rail lines also utilise standard gauge.
- Also standardization will make it possible to connect different lines across African regions.
 

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Yes, here in Australia we have a gauge nightmare. The various states use different gauges, which makes it hard to create an interconnected system.

I guess what Gar3th is wondering, is why did we spend a lot rehabilitating the narrow gauge lines. I would argue that the Standard Gauge projects have taken and are taking some time to develop, so we really could not bring our entire rail network to a standstill while we waited for Exim Banks loans to be finalized, or CCECC contracts to be awarded.

We had existing rail lines that had to function in some capacity, so we rehabilitated the narrow-gauge lines, even though our future plans lie with standard gauge.
 
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The majority of Africa uses Narrow Gauge tracks, and Narrow Gauge to connect different countries. I really dont understand why Nigeria and the whole continent should switch to standard gauge and spend trillion building new tracks. South Africa for example has 100% Narrow Gauge tracks and they dont have a problem. And they have a modern railway system, with modern signal equipment throughout. Just look at all the Cargo and transports they have by rail. As long as there is continuity and same sized tracks throughout.

So Nigeria and Kenya switching to standard gauge would mean they would either be isolated in Africa's rail system or force other nations who already have a modern Narrow Gauge system to switch over. And I doubt south Africa will switch at all.

And China just like funding new loans no matter what. Nigeria didnt need this, but China will fund it and build it and charge us the bill. IMO work should have stopped on rehabilitation of the old tracks.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rail_transport_in_South_Africa


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_Union_of_Railways
 
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The majority of Africa uses Narrow Gauge tracks, and Narrow Gauge to connect different countries. I really dont understand why Nigeria and the whole continent should switch to standard gauge and spend trillion building new tracks. South Africa for example has 100% Narrow Gauge tracks and they dont have a problem. And they have a modern railway system, with modern signal equipment throughout. Just look at all the Cargo and transports they have by rail. As long as there is continuity and same sized tracks throughout.

So Nigeria and Kenya switching to standard gauge would mean they would either be isolated in Africa's rail system or force other nations who already have a modern Narrow Gauge system to switch over. And I doubt south Africa will switch at all.

And China just like funding new loans no matter what. Nigeria didnt need this, but China will fund it and build it and charge us the bill. IMO work should have stopped on rehabilitation of the old tracks.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rail_transport_in_South_Africa


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_Union_of_Railways
You mean the "old tracks" built by Nigeria's colonial masters principally to ferry raw materials from the hinterland to the ports for shipment to the UK and Europe?! :eek:hno:

First, I have absolutely no idea what South African trains would be doing in Nigeria, so completely befuddled as to the relevance of its rail gauge. Nonetheless, it is NOT mutually-exclusive for Nigeria to rehabilitate its existing colonial rail lines while simultaneously embarking on a new rail network that would primarily serve the Nigerian national purpose of more efficiently moving goods and people across the length and breadth of the country and reducing wear-and-tear on Nigeria's beleaguered road infrastructure in the process.

Nigeria's population has more than quadrupled since those "old tracks" were laid during colonial rule, and progress can hardly be defined as getting back to the 1940s and 1950s (however tempting the nostalgia might be). Standard gauge rail lines afford Nigeria the considerable benefit of higher speed and greater weight loads over narrow gauge lines. That's where Nigeria should be headed and not backwards.
 

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Btw, Nigeria currently has no rail links with its neighbors, who do not use the same track gauge as Nigeria's "old tracks" - being former French colonies.
Standard gauge is coming soon to Nigeria's neighbours. :)
We already know that the new network being built will be extended to Maradi in Niger.

There is also talk of extending it from Ilorin to Parakou in Benin.

http://allafrica.com/stories/201705160120.html
 
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