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You needn´t explain this to me, I know it. but the sentence "Badagry has a lot of history to it (...) and a city with hotels, restaurants and night clubs around the slave ports could be a good idea."
Slave trade is a highly sensitive issue and I was a bit baffled by the idea of building a tourist centre with night clubs, big hotels and other leisure facilities AROUND it. Tourism needs a more soft approach around those grim spots. That´s the point that I was traying to make, maybe I misinterpreted Naijalove´s sentence.

The tourist facilities are to provide people with places to stay and things to do while visiting the mornuments. There is a reason why Goree Island and Ghana's forts are attracting more visitors and that is because they invested in facilities around the monuments. At the same time, Badagry's heritage as a commercial town/center is just as valid and the upgrading of Badagry is in line with this heritage.
 

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Mister One Million
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^^ The preservation of historical places is important. And it's inevitable that businesses will spring up around places that attract people. Those businesses may as well be as developed and organized as possible.
 

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Expert
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This "New City" will be lovely, however the government must remember that building a new city will not solve the problem that Lagos is currently facing.

It will mean that Nigeria has financial districts that is reflective of Nigeria's growing economy, it will also mean that the push and pull factor on Lagos will be eased and the redevelopment of infrastructure in Lagos will be executed more easily, however it all comes that to funds. Is the Nigerian economy in a position that will enable this initiative be feasible. Can Lagos be redeveloped and a new city be built at the same time. Or is rehabilitation the main issue here, will new estates be built in the "new city" where residents of Lagos can easily be relocated to. What will happen to the historical significance of Lagos if that is the measure that will be taken.

Thanks for posting the article and picture here Naijalove
 

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Some more renders

Courtesy of Niczberg





Lagos: The 'Dubai' of Africa?


The Lagos State Government in conjunction with a private firm plans to build a brand new city on the Atlantic Ocean!

Lagos, the central nervous system of Nigeria in terms of business, entertainment and tourist attraction, if well repackaged and branded, can be made a haven for business and fun seekers, which can generate several billions of dollars and create tens of thousand jobs for the teeming unemployed youths of the state. To achieve this lofty but attainable gigantic dream, their must be a political willingness that will facilitate enabling environment to bring this dream into reality.

LagosThe present Governor of Lagos, His Excellency, Babatunde Raji Fashola (SAN), has severally made it very clear in all speeches that he will ensure that Lagos will be able stand tall in the mist of world class cities such as London, New York City, Madrid, and so on. Victoria Island, the main commercial and business district of Lagos State obviously does not fit this mould. Build a brand new Victoria Island by sandfilling the Atlantic Ocean. What should you call this brand new city? EKO ATLANTIC CITY of course!

The proposed Eko Atlantic City (see layout on page 16) when completed will combine residential, commercial, financial and touristic accommodation in a location serviced by a state of-the-art high tech infrastructure. Once completed, Eko Atlantic shall be as big as Lagos' current prime business district, Victoria Island. The city is targeting 250,000 residents and 200,000 commuters flowing daily to the island to work.

The project reminds one of the gigantic city building projects of Dubai which has totally reinvented itself in the last 15 years, building brand new cities in the desert and on the seas surround it. Can the Government pull it off? Well it is interesting to note that the Lagos state Government is not putting one kobo into the project! Eko Atlantic City is promoted and sponsored by the Chagoury Group, West Africa's leading construction and property development group. The group is also involved in infrastructures development, dredging and land reclamation and owns Lagos' largest hotel (Eko Hotel). Currently the group is developing two major projects: Banana Island in Ikoyi, a residential complex on reclaimed land of approximately 1.8million square metres and Eko Akete, an infrastructural development of approximately 400 hectares, 30 km from Victoria Island, and situated on the Atlantic Ocean with an estimated 4 million square metres of land that will be available for sale for both residential and commercial purpose. If there is any group that can pull off this amazing project in Lagos, because of its expertise and experience, there is no doubt the Chagoury Group is the best partner for the Lagos State Government.

Lagos

How will the project be structured? Eko Atlantic Development, the special purpose vehicle put up by the Chagoury group for the development has been given a certificate of Occupancy for the reclaimed land according to an agreement signed between it and the LASG. Eko Atlantic Development is also responsible for setting guidelines for future construction. As concession holder and primary developer, Eko Atlantic Development will be entitled to grant leasehold to any buyer of any plot of land and will also be responsible for infrastructure development. Investors can then construct properties of their choice but according to previously established guidelines.

Although it all sounds very good on paper, questions will still have to be asked. How environmentally friendly would the process of creating the new city be? With the rampant waves of the Atlantic Ocean, how safe will the new city be from flooding and ocean overflowing its banks?
 

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Another artilce related to the new governor
Oct 12, 2007, 08:11 AM


FASHOLA & LAGOS MEGA CITY
By C. Don Adinuba

If the immediate past governor of Cross River State, Donald Duke, was Nigeria’s star governor between 1999 and 2007 on account of his composite development vision , Gov Babatunde Fashola of Lagos State may be the greatest revelation of the new dispensation which commenced last May 29.
At a forum organized in New York by Thisday Newspapers to coincide with both Nigeria’s 47th independence anniversary and the annual addresses by world leaders to the United Nations held in the first week of every October, Fashola stole the show with his presentation of a vision to transform Lagos into a mega city comparable with its status as the third largest city on the planet by 2015. Unlike most proclamations by Nigerian public officers over the decades, Fashola’s presentation was grand, sweeping, thoughtful and thoroughly believable. Oceanic Bank chief executive Cecelia Ibru, who is ordinarily calm, conservative and reserved as an individual but very aggressive and ebullient as a business manager, was so moved that she announced on the spot her bank’s readiness to grant a one billion dollar facility to the state government to grapple with the intimidating challenge of leading Lagos to truly step into the 21st Century with pride like other mega cities such as Mumbai, New Delhi, New York, Jakarta and Tokyo.

Lagos has grown so exponentially in the last few years that the whole state has practically become one huge metropolis. In other words, there are virtually no villages or even towns in the state any more. Its population is about 10 million, according to the National Population Commission, though the figure is fiercely contested by the state government which insists it is between 15 and 17 million. Whereas the annual population growth in the developing world is 3% and Nigeria’s is 2.7%, that of Lagos is a stunning 8%--and likely to accelerate. The state’s landmass is rather small by Nigerian standard (Kano State which officially has about the same population is about four times in land mass).

As if to exacerbate the situation, a substantial part of the metropolis is covered by water, a fact which makes the provision of roads, for instance, difficult and expensive. Worse, the development of modern facilities in the last quarter of a century has been in starts and fits. Take the reversal of the decision in the mid 1980s to build a metro line, which would have long been completed and would now be serving as the most important means of mass transportation. Or take the provision of elementary infrastructure like water and roads which has been a shambles. The people’s habits as regards waste disposal and our utter disregard for town planning laws and traffic regulations have not helped matters.

Still, Lagos is a huge and vibrant economy, relatively virgin. And the audience Gov Fashola addressed in New York comprised international development experts and entrepreneurs, so he took time to market immense business opportunities available in waste management, property development, marine transportation, light rail transportation, electricity, water and other vital areas. As noted earlier, he displayed a most impressive understanding of the authentic challenges of Lagos development as a mega city in the 21st Century, for which he received intermittent applauses. But the more impressive thing he did, in my view, was to appeal to the critical element of self-interest in every being, in particular the entrepreneur. In contrast to some African leaders like ex President Olusegun in 1999 and 2000 who would naively appeal to foreign investors “ to come and help us”— presumably on humanitarian or altruistic grounds—Gov Fashola explained carefully and convincingly returns on investments in Nigeria and the rates of the returns in specific sectors. He consistently referred to entrepreneurs as partners of the state government in the development of Lagos State. By so doing, he displayed a good appreciation of the nexus or correlation between profit motive and contemporary development.

In his magnum opus, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith long ago showed the pre-eminence of profit motive in human nature and the moral basis of the capitalist system. He cited the instance of how the pursuit of the private interests of the farmer and the butcher accounts for societal progress. The farmer makes food available to us and we eat and remain grateful to him for helping satisfy a key human desire. The same thing could be said about the butcher who provides us meat, a vital source of protein. But neither the farmer nor the butcher provides the fundamental needs of man for altruistic or humanitarian reasons. Each person is driven by the profit motive, or the desire to make money for himself. Interestingly, by pursuing his personal interests, he contributes immensely to the well-being of the larger society. Hence, there is peace and stability and security.

What every knowledgeable government normally does to encourage growth in a given area is to create the enabling environment and offer incentives to individuals and businesses so that they can invest there, lured by the prospect of substantial returns now or in the near future. The leading roles of American, Asian and European businesses in the ongoing transformation of Dubai in the United Arab Emirates are a good illustration. In an attempt to make money for themselves, the investors help the government to realize its objective, which is the quick modernization of the place. Put succinctly, public officials in Nigeria and elsewhere imbued with the mentality of “come- to- Macedonia -and –help- us” do not have a sophisticated world view of capitalism. The businessman is ordinarily obsessed with self-interest, the question of “what is in it for me?”

Fashola’s vision of a transformed Lagos which will take a pride of place among mega cities is hinged on the following minimum accomplishments, among others: construction of the Fourth Main Bridge, building of 10 000 flats in Lekki Peninsula, establishment of Eko Atlantic City on the water front, establishment of bus assembly plants, expansion of the Lagos-Badagry Highway to eight lanes to enhance West African economic integration, construction of a rail system linking all 28 activity centres in the state, turning the famous Bar Beach in Victoria Island devastated in the last few years by ocean surge into a tourist centre and an alluring estate, as well as renewal and expansion of existing infrastructure. It is also hinged on mobilizing all Lagosians to embrace a new social orientation founded on discipline, order and modernization. This project to leapfrog Lagos requires an awesome war chest, far beyond the capacity of the state government whose internally generated revenue has jumped from N7billion naira to N8b since last May 29 and is projected to balloon to N20b without tax hikes. No matter the level of assistance from the federal administration in Abuja, the state government’s resources for the transformation of Lagos will still be almost like a drop of water in the ocean. A lot of resources are needed from the private sector, especially from offshore sources. This, then, is the significance of Gov Fashola’s persuasive presentation at the recent forum on Nigeria and the world organized by Thisday Newspapers.

Fashola has the right kind of ambition. He does not want Lagos to be a local champion, that is, just Nigeria’s business capital or the country’s richest state, but a place comparable to respectable global cities like Dubai, perhaps the world’s fastest growing financial and business centre, and Sao Paulo, the heart beat of Brazil, which is fast emerging a global economic and manufacturing power. Fashola possesses the ambition, passion and intelligence but also the personal credibility to drive the process to make Lagos a worthy mega city. He inspires confidence, arguably the most critical function of the leadership in any environment. Former Vice President Alex Ekwueme, a gifted polyvalent intellectual whose personal credibility is on the same scale as his prodigious intellect, recently sat next to Fashola on a-one hour flight from Abuja to Lagos, and said of the governor in a private discussion with me the following day: “He strikes me as a high-minded administrator”. Ekwueme, not known for generous remarks about public officers, is a leader of a party fiercely engaged in a battle of wits with Fashola’s party.

The governor is in the same ideological mould as the Southeast Asian modernizers to the extent he is obsessed with development.
Unlike African countries, Southeast and some other Asian geopolitical entities like China, Malaysia, Taiwan, Singapore and Japan are called developmental nations because of their leaders’ absolute commitment to the transformation of their territories within a very short period, at a time their African counterparts are immersed in a paralysing culture of vanity, fraud, swindle, violence and division euphemistically called power politics. No wonder, Fashola is often referred to as a non Nigerian politician. Thank goodness, with him Lagos is in safe hands.

Adinuba is head of Discovery Public Affairs Consulting.
PS: Hopefully he has the mantality of Donald Duke, shrewd and business-minded like a fox! I love that!:cheers:
 

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Modulor Man
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wow.. impressive! this reminds me on James Rossants proposal. he also suggested landfilling to establish a new citycenter for lagos.

:cheers2:
 

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Fairplay
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It seems this thread is highlighting two different projects. The first one is in Badagry, while the one just posted is going to be built on a ladfill site.

You should open seperate threads for them.
 

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Expert
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Some more renders

Courtesy of Niczberg





Lagos: The 'Dubai' of Africa?

OMG......:shocked: This is a great Development...This Plus the Lekki Financial corridor wil make Lagos State a top tourist location....:applause:
 

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Modulor Man
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Taming the Atlantic ocean ...

Taming the Atlantic ocean ...





CASTLES, your weekly consumer magazine and the reference point for issues relating to property and real estate, spoke to the Honourable Commissioner for Lagos State Water Front Infrastructure Development, Prince Adesgun Oniru. Giving a brief history of the Ministry, Prince Oniru said it was established to create a world class water front infrastructure development for Lagos, to create an environment where people of all works of life can take Lagos as their holiday destination and to also create an enabling environment for both foreign and domestic investors along the Lagos water front.

Commenting further, Prince Oniru clarified that the project is long-termed and futuristic in nature, and that the first thing the Ministry has done is to protect Victoria Island from the ocean surge and erosion problem permanently. The phase two that the Ministry is about to embark on is solely been financed by a private developer at no cost to the State or the Federal government. This second phase as explained by Prince Oniru, is a new city in the ocean to be called EKO ATLANTIC CITY.

On how this city is going to be created, the Honourable commissioner said the sand will be taken back to where it was formerly in the late 50's and early 60's, about 5km back into the ocean up to the mole that can be seen at the bar beach and the one at Takwa Bay, and the middle one that has collapsed, which the Nigerian Ports Authority is about to replace. According the Prince Oniru, once this city is created just like any other land available, both foreign and domestic investors will be invited for allocation and he emphasized that the land allocated will have a definite duration to be developed by the investors and failure to do so will lead to forfeiture.

The commissioner also hinted that there is going to be a properly planned layout of structures that is already in place, approved by the State to curb alterations by investors and developers. CASTLES asked the commissioner on what the environmental effect of this project will be especially the taming of the bar beach, he took us back to the genesis of the ocean surge. He explained that the ocean surge was caused by the three moles (rocks put in place between 1908 and 1912) put in place by NPA, to create a path of still and calm water for big ocean liners going to dock at Apapa and Tin Can Island.

In essence, the bar beach overflowing its bank was caused by this action of NPA, which involves a lot of dredging to create a deep water for easy passage for vessels and the sands from Benin Republic that comes eastward was blocked and if you go to the other side of Takwa Bay called Lighthouse, an island has been created there because the sand can no longer go further. When these moles were constructed, the construction company created an artificial sand pumping machine for the sand to be pumped to the other side and when the machine broke down, it was not repaired and that is the reason why the ocean surge forward.

Prince Oniru gave kudos to the administration of Asiwaju Bola Ahmed Tinubu on the proactive measures he took to contain the surge. On what the Ministry is doing now, there won't be any negative environmental effect. Prince Oniru equated the EKO Atlantic City to dropping a pin in an ocean, which will have no effect. He tied this to the fact that all the scientific calculations has been done, all investigations done and an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is being carried now because of the magnitude of the projects. Prince Oniru concluded by saying that His Excellency, Babatunde Raji Fashola (SAN) is to passionate about this project and Lagos is taken a new face.

The Chagoury Group in a promotional brochure on the project also explains that the design of the Eko Atlantic City includes protective breakwaters on its outer perimeter to provide shelter from the ocean waves. The breakwater will be designed as a submerged and immerged wall utilising advanced 'x-blocs'. 'x-blocs' are enormous X shaped concrete blocks designed to dissipate energy of the waves. The land itself will be reclaimed through a mixture of sandfilling, rocks and concrete.
 

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Sterling Bank to help make Lagos mega city

Even as the country is guaranteeing international loans to help build Lagos, Sterling Bank has pledged support for the project as well.

On-going efforts to make Lagos State a mega city has received a boost as Sterling Bank Plc has pledged to support the state in achieving her dream.

Already, the Bank has set up a special projects/ infrastructure financing unit to work with the state government and collaborate with the various stakeholders in ensuring the realization of a people friendly and vibrant Lagos mega city.

Managing Director/Chief Executive Officer, Sterling Bank Plc, Babatunde Dabiri who spoke on "The Case for Lagos Mega City", made these disclosures recently.

Noting that Sterling Bank has since been working with Lagos State Government to source international, multilateral and bilateral financing, he listed some of the projects being financed by the bank to include the on-going transportation project (BRT), the automation of vehicle registration and lands registry.

The Sterling Bank boss also listed some of the challenges in Lagos State to include catering for a population of over 15 people; infrastructure requirements – roads, bridges, waste management, energy, water etc.; environmental issues – industrial pollution, drainage systems and education/health – to build capacity to support the world class institutions (manufacturing & service) to be attracted to the State.

Acknowledging that the State still has a long way to go in terms of security, he commended the renewed efforts by the State, noting that it still needs both private and Federal Government support.

Other sectors requiring urgent attention according to Dabiri include the real estate, which requires new residential houses and commercial properties; the tourism & hospitality that needs more conferencing facilities, more hotel rooms; restaurants and recreation facilities like beaches, parks, tourist attractions.

Restating that the banking sector is ready to play its role in making Lagos the financial hub of the African Continent, he maintained that the Nigerian banking sector has now been re-energized through consolidation, which produced 25 strong institutions with regional and international ambitions.

"Consequently, there has been foreign interest in majority of the 25 banks, there have been investments in several banks by foreign financial institutions, some have become subsidiaries of international banks, several banks have employed foreign bankers in key positions i.e. credit, consumer banking, retail banking, I.T etc. and there have also been adverts in The Economist for international staff.

"Besides, various forms of corporate social responsibility initiatives by banks e.g. roads reconstruction, donation of IT centre at LASU, donation of hostel accommodation at universities and initiative on security.

"That Lagos will be a mega city is not in doubt. It would continue to be the commercial capital of Nigeria and should be the financial hub of Africa by 2020.

"The financial system particularly the banking sector is geared up in ensuring that this objective is achieved. The sector continues to strengthen itself and has the capability to finance and ensure the attraction of foreign capital to handle the various infrastructure financing requirements," he stressed.

For Lagos to be a mega city, he maintained that there has to be massive local and international financing. He also added that creative solutions would also be required and multilateral agencies would also have a significant role to play in this regard.
 

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250,000? only?
lagos is piped to inrease by 9 million people, and all that can be done is a city for 250000?
how irresponsible. thought it was larger.
 

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Modulor Man
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250,000? only?
lagos is piped to inrease by 9 million people, and all that can be done is a city for 250000?
how irresponsible. thought it was larger.
the articles says the new landfilled district can be occupied by 250.000 residents. lagos is probably going to grow at its periphery and could also get much denser in the inner distrcts to absorb its growing population. thats why there is a idea is to establish industry parks in the surounding ogun states to take pressure away from lagos state.
 

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I get your point but the fact remains that the slave monument is not going to lie fallow. If you want people to visit it and remember the past, there has to be a place for them to stay and other things you can offer while they take time to reflect on the monuments of the past. The main reason no one knows about Badagry monuments is because there is simply no world standard facilities around for people to stay.

On the issue of commercial centers, Badagry was as much a commercial town as it was a slave town. This project runs in line with Badagry's heritage, both as a slave port and as a commercial town in its own right. I think this project is the best way to capture the two.
as much as i am totally in line with the Megacity Project, i must say, that the only true masterplan for a citys development will arise as a consequence of the 'historical preceedents' of the city. by this, i mean the reaction of the people due to the times to economic factors. in lagos, several kinds of structures have been invented due to this, an example is the habitable business bridge. i dont see any of these structures in this plan, so to me it is a farce. the lagoon would have been the perfect location for a new Lagos... reasons best known to me.
 

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Modulor Man
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as much as i am totally in line with the Megacity Project, i must say, that the only true masterplan for a citys development will arise as a consequence of the 'historical preceedents' of the city. by this, i mean the reaction of the people due to the times to economic factors.
that is for sure true if you talk about the development of european, north american and asian urban areas under historical aspects. but lagos is a mega city in a development country - its development is forced by a disproportionate growth of population which is not going accord the economic growth. lagos can´t handle its growth without injecting capita and ideas from outside to accelerate planning processes.


in lagos, several kinds of structures have been invented due to this, an example is the habitable business bridge. i dont see any of these structures in this plan, so to me it is a farce. the lagoon would have been the perfect location for a new Lagos... reasons best known to me.
from urban planning view points nobody could be fully satisfied with this plan. but i think the investors idea was to create a new distrct away from the traffic stressed, overcrowded and jerry-built neighborhoods. Connecting EKO ATLANTIC CITY to Victoria Island makes sense if you think in this way.

Fact is Lagos Island needs a massive urban redevelopment like Georges Eugène Haussmann did in Paris. But 150years later we are luckily far away from such kind of aristocratic visions.

habitable business bridge??? whaz that??
 

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habitable business bridge??? whaz that?

habitable business bridge??? whaz that??
i love the lagos spirit... it is one of constant invention. this is the answer to your question: people, due to the economy of Lagos, presently, in many areas around the city live under bridges... these same people trade on the surface of these bridges in the mornings too. they never complain of robberies at these areas because there is no gathering point for the robbers.
hence, the habitable business bridge will be the urban typology that brings this new uses of the Lagos bridge to fruit in a new, well researched light.
Lagos is absolutely no place for a hausmann... te form of the city is inherent in a new kind of geometry perhaps only perculiar to Lagos. lagos does not need straight roads... it needs its true urban form to be researched and reused for its continuance. it is Lagos that needs this 9 million people, not Ogun.
 

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the articles says the new landfilled district can be occupied by 250.000 residents. lagos is probably going to grow at its periphery and could also get much denser in the inner distrcts to absorb its growing population. thats why there is a idea is to establish industry parks in the surounding ogun states to take pressure away from lagos state.
well ok... is thatto say that this region will be equivalent to another Lagos Island? have you seen what has happened there over the years, how good intentions have collided with the Lagos spirit by a forceful need for Eucleadian Order?
it can then be said that lagos go eventually 'marina-up' wont it? with these kinds of developments, it becomes very difficult for the city to solve her problems, and then it will forever be the megacity of slums it is today. but this is not the way it should be.
and reclammation is a scourge... have you ever considered Boyles Law out of the context of gases, and applied its precepts to the ocean in Lagos, with regards to reclammation? dont forget that the pressure willl invariably increase with every decrease in volume, as reclammation itself is... we must learn to attack our problems directly, and stop looking for short term fire brigade approaches.
:cheers:
 
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