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LANSERIA International Airport, west of Johannesburg, is poised for a major growth spurt next year with the planned introduction of 1time Airlines flights as well as kulula’s expansion into the turboprop regional market.

Several African airlines, serving point-to-point markets, have also expressed interest in flying from the airport.

Gavin Sayce, airport manager at privately owned Lanseria, said yesterday that the operator will spend "hundreds of millions of rand" on a new runway, a multi-storey parkade and some changes to the terminal building in the next 12 months to cope with the increased demand.

"We are also improving our shuttle service in our car park and are in talks with several hotel operators regarding the possibility of building a hotel in the airport grounds," Mr Sayce said.

Last year the Lanseria airport expanded its parking to 1800 bays and any additional bays will have to be accommodated in a multistorey parkade to ensure the airport maintains its reputation for convenience.

"Plans for an upgraded runway have been on the drawing board for some time, but we put the project on ice due to the Soccer World Cup," he said.

The airport’s apron can accommodate up to six narrow-body aircraft at one time, with capacity to extend this to nine.

This surge in demand and the resulting upgrades come at the end of a five-year exclusivity agreement this year between Lanseria and kulula operator Comair , which has opened the market to new operators.

Glenn Orsmond, CEO of 1time, said yesterday that the airline is in advanced discussions with Lanseria and hopes to begin flights in the first half of next year. "We have given Lanseria management our schedules and are finalising the details of the agreement," Mr Orsmond said.

Kulula also plans to expand its presence at the airport next year, using turboprop aircraft to serve the regional market. It has already secured the rights for flights between Lanseria and Maputo.

Gidon Novick, joint-CEO of Comair, said yesterday it will also add further domestic flights once the new runway is in place. The low-cost airline already flies on average seven times a day to Cape Town and six times to Durban.

Mr Sayce said while the airport’s domestic terminal is reaching capacity, there is still scope for expansion in international departures to cope with growing regional flights.

"The sub-Saharan African air market is opening up rapidly and Lanseria is ideally placed to serve it," he said.

In the past five years, since kulula launched its first flights, the airport has grown rapidly. Mr Sayce said that this year more than 1-million passengers will have used the airport and the introduction of new scheduled services is likely to boost that number substantially next year.

"For us the challenge is to keep the service level and convenience of a small airport while expanding the airport. That is what sets Lanseria apart from other airports," Mr Sayce said.

The aim is to continue to add incrementally to the airport’s facilities to ensure capacity remains ahead of any future demand.

[email protected]
http://www.businessday.co.za/articles/Content.aspx?id=127840
 

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good good competition to acsa
 

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Expansion plans take flight after World Cup success

Lanseria International Airport has played a vital role in South Africa’s aviation industry and since its privatization it has become one of the busiest civil aviation airports in South Africa

Written by Abigail Phillips & Produced by Tom Lloyd | Wed Jan 5, 2011
TAGS: Airport, Aviation, Gavin Sayce, Lanseria, Lanseria International Airport, South Africa, Supply Chain
Lanseria International Airport

Lanseria International Airport Lanseria International Airport 123..Statistics
Name: Lanseria International Airport
Country: South Africa
Est: 1974
Employees: 6,500
Website: www.lanseria.co.za
Management
Airport Manager: Gavin Sayce
Established in 1974 by two Pretoria pilots, Fanie Haacke and Abe Sher, Lanseria International Airport originally belonged to the Roodepoort and Krugersdorp municipalities. Since the day of its inception, it has had an international status.

In 1991, Lanseria’s co-owners announced that the airport was to be sold. Tenders for the ownership and management of the airport were issued and the tender was awarded to a consortium of private investors in 1991. Lanseria International Airport has played a vital role in South Africa’s aviation industry, and since its privatization it has become one of the busiest civil aviation airports in South Africa.

Considered issues such as the airport’s location in relation to residential areas, land suited to good approaches, identification of smog and fog-free zones. These considerations have been instrumental in ensuring Lanseria’s enduring success. Gavin Sayce, manager of Lanseria International Airport conceded that the location of the airport has contributed in facilitating its expansion, both in terms of infrastructure and passenger capacity. He says: “We are ideally located between the flying population areas of Johannesburg and the rest of the Gauteng province. It is well situated and it is becoming more accessible due to the much improved road infrastructure.”

Kulula.com, one of the leading low cost airlines commenced service years ago at Lanseria International Airport with one scheduled return flight to Cape Town per day. It has expanded considerably since then and now handles more than 76 return flights to Cape Town and Durban weekly. The airport has handled more than 1 million passengers this year and the predictions for the year are almost double this figure, vast improvement on passenger numbers just five years ago.

Expansion plans
Lanseria International Airport has a number of expansion plans in the pipeline; the most significant development being the extension of the runway which will allow the airport to accommodate larger commercial aircraft such as Boeing 767 and Airbus A300 models.

“We are also looking to increase the number of facilities available to passengers. Our long term plan is to build a new terminal building and a large multi-storey car park,” says Sayce. “We are also planning for a hotel to cater for travel and conferencing requirements.”

Sayce also reveals that there will be significant investment in new navigational equipment, better lighting systems and advanced security systems. “We will be implementing the most advanced technology and systems on the market to ensure high levels of customer service and most importantly safety.”
Lanseria International Airport’s five year plan is to change more from a general aviation airport to one which caters for a specific market in the scheduled domain. “We are talking to several airlines across Sub-Saharan Africa to look at more regional operations, to cater for a specific ‘point-to-point’ customer with no connections required,” explains Sayce. “In our five year plan, the construction work and development is based on the fact that we believe there will be an increase in domestic travel and a growth in regional, scheduled traffic.

Customer service
“In addition to developing as a low cost hub; we cater for the business passenger as many of our travelers come from the more affluent areas of Johannesburg . Our goal is to be user-friendly and service orientated and to provide comfortable travel for our passengers,” he says.

“When passengers arrive at Lanseria International Airport they will not have to walk miles from their car to get to the terminal and they will not be standing in a queue for half an hour to get to the boarding gate. We sell our passengers convenience, ease of use and a pleasurable experience,” says Sayce.

Sayce states that such a high level of customer service is possible owing to the airports private status, and its dedication to customer satisfaction. “When a passenger uses Lanseria International Airport they will receive a unique level of customer service; we are privately owned and that gives us the flexibility to negotiate and meet in the middle providing customers with a bespoke service.”

The FIFA World Cup 2010
Sayce speaks passionately about the 2010 World Cup, hosted in South Africa and alludes that a lot of benefits have come from hosting such a prestigious world event. He suggests that the World Cup was instrumental in facilitating expansion plans and also because the successful planning and preparation in advance of and during the World Cup has heightened the airports profile and reputation considerably.

“The World Cup was great for us. We had in excess of 6000 World Cup related movements at the airport. On the final day of the event over 250 executive business jets and larger aircraft sat wing over wing for over two kilometers; it was a wonderful sight.”

With a significant boost from the World Cup, Lanseria International Airport has managed to raise its profile as an up-and-coming airport in the specialist business travel industry. According to Sayce the airport is fast becoming a preferable alternative to the Oliver Tambo airport in Johannesburg and with huge expansion plans about to take flight, the future of Lanseria International Airport looks very positive.

http://www.africanbusinessreview.co.za/company-reports/lanseria-international-airport
 

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Lanseria airport mulls new runway, second terminal as passenger numbers soar

By: Irma Venter
19th January 2011

Lanseria International Airport (LIA) could see significant investment as it expands further over the next five years.

LIA is the only other international airport in Gauteng, the primary one being the OR Tambo International Airport.

Passenger numbers at LIA reached more than one-million last year, up from around 150 000 in 2005.

“It could touch, or exceed, two-million passengers by the end of this year,”
says LIA airport manager Gavin Sayce.

To put this number into perspective, consider that Port Elizabeth is the fourth-biggest airport in the Airports Company South Africa stable, and that it has a capacity of two-million passengers a year.

The growth in number of passengers using LIA has come largely on the back of an agreement between Kulula and the airport in 2005, which saw the low-cost airline initiate its service with one flight to and from Cape Town a day. Now, however, that has grown to 77 flights a week into the airport, and 77 flights departing the airport, flying to Durban and Cape Town.

There are plans afoot to increase this to more than 100 flights a week both ways.

1time, another budget airline, is also locked in talks with LIA management, and could start operations from the airport, located in northern Johannesburg, in the second quarter of this year.

“We are also talking to some other airlines which are interested in operating from here,” notes Sayce.

“In the end, we would like to extend our role as the regional airport of choice, serving Africa and beyond.”

However, these ambitions require infrastructure.

Sayce says that LIA could see the construction of a new, large domestic low-cost airline terminal, with the current terminal morphing into the international terminal.

New infrastructure would also include a new, additional runway to increase capacity, a new multistorey parkade, along with extensions to the existing parking area, as well as possibly a new hotel, located on the grounds.

The road to the airport, the R512, off the N14, is in the process of being upgraded, and will soon be completed, a project which LIA management has lobbied for strongly.

LIA itself employs just under 200 people, but around 7 000 people work at the airport in total.

The airport was established in 1974, as a municipal airfield, but was privatised in 1991. Today, it is owned by a private consortium.

Besides its recent growth as a budget airline hub, Lanseria airport has also become known as a port of entry for Heads of State, celebrities and captains of industry.

http://www.engineeringnews.co.za/ar...terminal-as-passenger-numbers-soar-2011-01-19
 

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^^ yes and no. Lanseria wont be able to handle much in the way of large intercontinental traffic. It will likely grow on smaller regional traffic. But will struggle if the only connections within SA from it are LCC's. Business into Africa is not really designed for the lcc platform unless they do alot to change it
 

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Lanseria takes off

Some significant developments, some of which we 'knew' about, others not.

More airlines will operate regional flights out of Lanseria airport from next month, thanks to expanded facilities.

The FM understands that by the end of March, Comair’s budget airline kulula — currently the only airline at the airport, situated 40km northwest of OR Tambo International Airport — will increase its weekly departures from 76 to 99.

SAA subsidiary Mango will introduce four flights to Cape Town at the beginning of June.

1Time will introduce eight departures a day to Durban and Cape Town from the first week of May.

British Airways, also operated by Comair in SA, will introduce two departures daily to Gaborone and Maputo in April and Zambezi Airlines is to introduce an undisclosed number of flights to Zimbabwe from early May.

Smaller operators see Lanseria as an attractive alternative to OR Tambo, which is operated by Airports Company SA.

Negotiations for “park and ride” bus services between Lanseria and the Coca- Cola Dome, Midrand Gautrain station and Montecasino are also in progress.

Urgent maintenance at the airport will mean the main runway will be closed from 6pm on Saturdays to 6am the following morning over the next five weeks. In addition, 500 new parking bays are to be built over three months, with the entrance relocated for easier access.

A new 45m x 3275m runway is to be built between the two existing runways. Once it’s completed, in 12 months, the two smaller runways will be shut down.

Lanseria airport manager Gavin Sayce says negotiations with a number of airlines have been initiated but could not confirm or deny the details.

“We continue to add capacity ... but nothing is finalised yet.”

1Time CEO Rodney James confirms the airline will soon start flying out of Lanseria but says, “We can only announce the details once we have finished our business plan around the route. There are many factors to consider before launching a route, including slot availability, especially at an airport that has restricted capacity around peak times.”

Comair CEO Gidon Novick says the airline’s budget brand kulula will grow capacity at Lanseria by 35% from March with more Durban and Cape Town flights. Regional flights outside SA’s borders are also planned.

“Lanseria is much smaller and less congested than OR Tambo and the simplicity of it offers a great convenience benefit,” he says.

http://www.fm.co.za/Article.aspx?id=134629
A 3.3km long runway could also make HLA a viable wide body alternative to ORTIA for diversions. All in all some very good news for the airport.
 

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^^ ... except if you're an Avcom member, they're whining about the death of general aviation at FALA again... while forgetting that commercial and general aviation coexists quite happily at FACT.
 

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Lol, I was having quite a chuckle at some of the Avcom comments. Change is difficult to accept,but maybe Lanseria's expansion will open up some more general aviation opportunities for Grand Central, Wonderboom and Krugersdorp.
 

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Let's be honest the Avcom folks, most are GA nuts that only think of that, everything else is an inconvenience. They the same nuts that ate up comair buying the old durban airport so they could have a GA pad there.
 

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Lol, I was having quite a chuckle at some of the Avcom comments. Change is difficult to accept,but maybe Lanseria's expansion will open up some more general aviation opportunities for Grand Central, Wonderboom and Krugersdorp.
Remember Lanseria is in Krugersdorp.
 

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from avcom.co.za:

1Time has been complaining about getting into Lanseria and now they're falling behind with their plans.

Mango to launch Lanseria operation as fifth aircraft comes online
- Booking opens tomorrow

Low cost airline Mango will launch operations from Lanseria on 1 June 2011 with bookings open at 10:00 on Tuesday 3 May for its inaugural route to and from Cape Town.

Mango will make 15 000 selected flights available (terms and conditions at http://www.flymango.com) at a fare of R 495 one way on sale between 10:00 on 3 May and 31 May at 17:00 for travel between June, July and August. The airline, with best domestic on time record over the past three years, will be the second low cost carrier to operate out of Lanseria.

Initial frequency to Cape Town would see three flights daily on week days depart daily from in each direction. “Lanseria is the second route launch for Mango in the past year,” says CEO Nico Bezuidenhout. The airline launched its successful Johannesburg Bloemfontein route last year. “Growth is a priority on our agenda following a successful post-launch period.”

Bezuidenhout is optimistic about the airline’s new operation. “Demand has significantly increased across all routes and the introduction of a second presence in Gauteng will further strengthen Mango’s value proposition. We continue to offer the widest distribution and payment method network to our Guests, and operations from Lanseria will further cement Mango’s commitment to its mandate of making air travel more accessible and affordable to South Africans.”

Lanseria Cape Town flights will be available on http://www.flymango.com and through the Mango call centre 08611 62646 from 3 May at 10:00. Edgars account card holders will also be able to book flights departing to and from Lanseria and bookings will also be available through Shoprite, Checkers and Checkers Hyper Money Market Counters and travel agents.

The airline’s fifth new generation Boeing 737-800 aircraft, owned by General Electric Capital Aviation Services, also came on line last week. Mango’s fleet now comprises 5 aircraft.



Mango will fly between Lanseria and Cape Town 3 times daily weekdays in each direction:

Departing Lanseria:

05:55
11:55
17:50

Departing Cape Town:

08:35
15:05
20:40

Saturdays departing Lanseria:
06:30
13:15


Saturdays departing Cape Town:
09:30
16:15


Sundays departing Lanseria:
06:30
12:10
17:50


Sundays departing Cape Town:

09:20
14:50
20:40




About Mango

- Mango was launched in October 2006 as South Africa’s first globally benchmarked Low Cost Carrier. Mango’s first flight departed on November 15, 2006.
- Mango operates five new generation Boeing 737-800 aircraft with a seat capacity of 186 Guests per flight.
- To date, Mango has carried near 6 million Guests.
- Mango currently flies between Johannesburg and Durban, Johannesburg and Cape Town, Bloemfontein and Cape Town and Durban and Cape Town and Johannesburg and Bloemfontein. From 1 June the airline will also fly between Lanseria and Cape Town.
- Mango presently tops all domestic airlines in terms of its on-time performance over the past 3 years.
- Mango has led the industry with innovations that include a wide distribution strategy with bookings available online (http://www.flymango.com), through its call centre (08611 62646), Checkers, Shoprite and Checkers Hyper Money Market Counters, travel agents, My Market (corporate). Through its website, Mango also accepts the widest variety of payment methods, including most major credit cards, Edgars and Jet account cards(a world first), online debit transfers, FNB Cell Pay Point and Nedbank N-Pay transactions.
- Mango Plus is a business travel product to deliver affordable business travel and includes Bid Air Premier Lounge access, 10kg additional check in luggage, same route flexibility sans penalties and on board refreshment vouchers. Mango Flex delivers same route flexibility but excludes the frills.
 

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South Africa’s fourth largest airport reveals ambitious plans to overtake King Shaka in Durban

Lanseria International Airport, in the north of Johannesburg, says it aims to double its passenger numbers to more than four million within the next six years.

In 2017, Lanseria, which is South Africa’s fourth largest airport by passenger numbers among 21 significant local airports, moved just over 1.9 million passengers.

The airport wants to surpass King Shaka International Airport in Durban as the country’s third-largest airport behind the Cape Town and OR Tambo airports, said its CEO, Rampa Rammopo.

The airport is planning to increase its numbers to six million passengers by 2027, and by 2050, it is eyeing an expansion to 18 million passengers a year.

To achieve the envisaged growth, the Lanseria terminal building and parking space will have to be expanded, the airport’s fuel farm and technical facilities will have to be relocated and its general infrastructure will have to be upgraded.

https://businesstech.co.za/news/bus...ans-to-overtake-king-shaka-airport-in-durban/
 

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Well if it aims to get to 6m in 2027 and is at 1.9m it would have to have its target of surpassing King Shaka re-evaluated, as the KSIA prediction is for 16m by 2030, which I also think is optimistic. But if it is already at 5.65m, it will still be well ahead of Lanseria by then. Seems newspaper writer logic.

That said, I feel Lanseria has an important role to play to balance out OR T, but I can't see massive growth at this airport
 

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Sao Paulo Airport went from 13 million in 2004 to 40 million in 2014, so you never know what can happen over 10 years. Gauteng is the airport hub of all Southern Africa so I see both of its major airports growing substantially over the coming years.
 

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If Lanseria is going to meet those growth targets and do so without cannibalizing ORT, then a significant portion of that traffic will have to come from growth to KSIA, so even if it grows, KSIA will grow with it.
 
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