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i was wondering about this. which towns or cities don't have bus stations and which are the largest to not have them.

i'll start with eastbourne, population about 100,000. the bus station was sold off in the 80s after the then tory council decided only poor people took buses, everyone else would drive, so there was no need for one.
 

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I don't know how you'd assess London. There are suburban bus stations but not one central bus point.

Large cities are generally too big for bus stations. Leeds City Bus Station only serves buses and coaches from outside the city. All local buses use the PTB and smaller bus points across the City.

There's a point where a city centre becomes too big for one transport focus.
 

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London has Victoria Coach Station if that means anything.
 

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Serving coaches from the UK and abroad mainly though.

I suppose the bus network in London is organised different, centred predominantly on smaller bus stations like Hammersmith or Vauxhall. A much more efficient way to run a bus network!
 

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It also depends how you define a bus station. Are collections of shelters in a row counted, if so Birmingham would have a few, and within the greater birmingham conurbation are plenty, such as Wolverhampton, Dudley, or Walsall (within the "city" would be Bearwood and such).
 

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Reading had a bus station for long distance routes that was closed in the 90's, along with most of the routes that ran from it. But contrary to popular belief the corporation buses, that have now become Reading transport have never used it. Lots demand a replacement for the local buses, but my opinion is that high frequency cross town services do not need it. It is noted that nearby Basingstoke, a smaller town, has a bus station, but the whole town centre is pedestrianised. It appears that those towns with a bus station have no stops in the town centre for these services, hence the bus staton.
Movement in and out of a bus station takes too much time. All that is needed is a terminating area near the station for lesser routes to start and finish from, which is already provided in Reading. An example of how suburban services should run is Londons west end, where there is no bus station, only various termini and routes crossing the whole area. Bus stations work better for long distance services.
 

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This thread has raised another interesting question for me. What's the largest town or city with a bus station?

I'm talking traditional bus stations here - ones which act as a terminus for the vast majority of the town's local services.
 

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Yes - National Express still call there. Nice little building with no obvious connection to anywhere else.
Apart from a four buses per hour park and ride service to CMK, going two an hour to Woburn Sands in the opposite way, as well as an hourly bus link to Bletchley, two an hour to Oxford and Cambridge, another to Bedford combining with the ex-Bletchley one to give two an hour to Newport Pagnell and a rather large car park. Oh I forgot the Cranfield service too!
 

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Apart from a four buses per hour park and ride service to CMK, going two an hour to Woburn Sands in the opposite way, as well as an hourly bus link to Bletchley, two an hour to Oxford and Cambridge, another to Bedford combining with the ex-Bletchley one to give two an hour to Newport Pagnell and a rather large car park. Oh I forgot the Cranfield service too!
He's done you there
 
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