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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Latrobe Street, Marvellous Melbourne

Photographs taken over the past three years.

From east-end to west-end

Part1















Above and below, former City Court (later Magistrates’ Court).









Next two down, the interior of a favourite hangout in Latrobe Street, Mr Tulk at the ground level of the northwest library corner.



 

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I actually had the chance to stay in Latrobe St on my last visit (Harbourview Hotel). I have a fondness for the Federal Court Building. :)
 

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There are some amazing buildings along La Trobe St, but there are also some shockers, especially between Exhibition & Russell Sts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
A few oldies but goodies.

The Argus building and W2 class tram, December 1959.



The one of a kind Y class tram and three old red telephone boxes near the corner of La Trobe and Elizabeth Streets, October 1960.



The future site of Melbourne Central, August 1961 (no great loss here).

 

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Are you kidding? How much nicer was the street frontage? (You're referring to the block opposite the carpark, right?)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Are you kidding? How much nicer was the street frontage? (You're referring to the block opposite the carpark, right?)
Not kidding, mediocre period buildings that were mainly car dealers do not look that good. I will concede that there was more active street frontage, but I'll have the Kisho Kurokawa modernist classic that is Melbourne Central any day (even with the new changes) instead. :yes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Melbourne Central
Block of Swanston, Latrobe, Elizabeth and Lt Lonsdale Streets.
1988-1991
Kisho Kurokawa, Bates, Smart & McCutcheon, Hassel Pty. Ltd
Recent Renovations by ARM

The office tower follows the concept of skyscraper design as a "Crystal Cut" volume. Within the smooth shape, the facades are a composition of heterogeneous materials, such as stone, aluminum panel, reflective glass and tinted glass. At the top of the tower, high-technology communication equipment is visible. The lower part of the building is more traditional in design. The facade represents a transition, from the solid city building at the base, which slowly evaporates towards the sky. The basic concept of Melbourne Central consists of the four following targets:

• The Symbiosis of History and the Present.
The existing shot tower located on the redevelopment site is not necessarily important from the architectural point of view. It is, however, an important landmark with which the citizens of Melbourne are familiar. This historical testimony is enclosed in the conic glass atrium. It is important to preserve historical buildings while making the most of them in the present town.

• The Crystal Cut Office Tower.
The form of the high-rise crystal cut office tower has the same concept with the Central Plaza in Brisbane. The mullion pattern on the facade is introduced to avoid the uniformity.

•Abstraction or Pure Geometry.
One of the methods to create multivalent and ambivalent architecture is to quote fragments of historical symbols. The other method is to quote abstract forms, which are the achievements of modern architecture and modern art. Abstraction can be freely interpreted, to produce multivalent meaning. In this project, various abstract forms are quoted, such as rectangle, cone, inverted-cone (concave conically-shaped cut-out in the facade), and sphere (dome).

•The Symbiosis of Various Functions.
The contemporary city has lost vitality, which was produced by overlaying and compounding various functions. Melbourne Central is aiming at the complex that vitalizes a city.
__________________________________________________________________________

Melbourne Central has recently undergone major renovations at the podium level, with the number of shops increasing, the opening up and inclusion of laneways, more light penetration, the introduction of a cinema complex and the removal of a department store.
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The future site of Melbourne Central, August 1961, before demolition to make way for Melbourne’s underground rail loop.



The old Museum Station (Swanston Street end), before its name change and demolition to make way for Melbourne Central.




A postcard highlighting the original Melbourne Central.

The way it used to be inside the cone.
I wonder what happened to the props (biplane and balloon)?



The dome, the cone and the crystal.
The dome is now gone. :cry:



Melbourne Central has since undergone some major renovations at ground level, gone is the purity of Kurokowa’s modern design to be replaced by ARMs more eclectic pop bent.
Below are recent photographs I’ve taken of Melbourne Central’s new look.

























 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Text from Walking Melbourne
The National Trust guide to the historic and architectural landmarks of central Melbourne

Coop’s Shot Tower
Inside Melbourne Central, La Trobe Street, between Swanston and Elizabeth Streets.

In a rather bizarre heritage compromise, this fascinating example of industrial history is now enclosed within a modern shopping centre. Walter Coop’s Shot Tower and Factory were erected in 1890; the central 50 metre high castellated tower that remains was used in the production of shotgun pellets, called ‘shot’. Molten metal was poured into spherical pellets which cooled in water at the bottom, where shoppers now dine in air-conditioned comfort.

Below, two shots of my own.



 

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I really love this building - when I was working at the Urban Workshop I'd walk past the old Magistrate's Court on my lunch break and just oggle at it.

Brilliant work Collector :righton:
 

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Great pics! I will be going to Melbourne and Sydney this week. Whats the temperature like? Do I need to bring jacket? Is it cold there now? I heard its about 15-23c.
Sydney

Tues Rain Developing 16C-22C

Wed Rain Periods 18C-22C

Thurs Rain Easing. Chance of Thunderstorm 19C-24C

Fri Shower or two 20C-24C

Sat Shower or two 16C-20C

Sun Shower or two 14C-20C

Melbourne

Tues Becoming Cloudy. Late shower or two 11C-23C

Weds Cloudy. Scattered Showers and Isolated Thunderstorms 13C-26C

Thurs Morning Thunderstorms. Isolated Shower or two later 17C-23C

Fri Isolated Showers 14C-20C

Sat Partly Cloudy. Isolated Showers 11C-18C

Sun Clearing to Sunny Afternoon 11C-24C

Sydney is more humid so it will feel warmer than Melbourne during the evening especially.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Text from Melbourne Architecture

Former Working Men’s College (Francis Ormond Building)
124 LaTrobe Street
1885-87 Terry & Oakden and Nahum Barnet (Bowen Street wing)
1890-92 Oakden Addison and Kemp La Trobe Street wing & tower block)
c. 1935, 1955, 1997 additions, alterations and refurbishment

The first building of the Working Men’s College, and now the administrative headquarters of RMIT University, the Francis Ormond Building was constructed in two stages. The Bowen Street wing (1885-87) housed the main lecture hall (now the council chamber), workshops, classrooms and caretaker’s quarters. Designed in rigorous Gothic Revival style, this first stage was funded one-third by the founder of the Working Men’s College, the Hon. Francis Ormond MLC, and two-thirds from public donations and levies raised from members of the Trades Hall Council.
The La Trobe Street wing and its distinctive tower block, which suggests the influence of High Victorian architect William Burges, comprised the second stage (1890-92). Ormond was again the major sponsor, but this time through his bequest. Added were offices, college council and instructors’ rooms, classrooms and laboratories. The final building was thus completed to the original masterplan of its architect and instructor at the Working Men’s College, Percy Oakden.

An Edwardian postcard below and after that two photographs of my own.





 
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