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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

sorry for starting a brand new thread, but I didn't want to spam the existing ones with my private questions :)

I'm a fresh architecture graduate, trying to learn classical styles on my own. My university was a typical "modernist" school, so any experiments with traditional forms were more or less forbidden... :nono:

Firstly, I'm looking for good textbooks. Could somebody help me with recommendable titles?

I've already read (inter alia):

1. Vitruvius - "Ten books of architecture" (more of a philosopical book than a practical guide)
2. Alberti - "On the art of building" (essential, universal thoughts about architecture)
3. Palladio - "Four books of architecture" (a good book to actually start with. It contains tips for drawing orders and also examples of their usage in beautiful buildings. However, it's hard to memorize forms as axplained by the author)
4. Vignola - "The five orders of architecture" (orders clearly explained, easy to memorize)
5. William Chambers - "A tretise on the decorative part of civil architecture" (forms, mouldings etc. explained in a very logical way. Also, some general thoughts on composition)
6. George Gibbs - "Rules for drawing the several parts of architecture" (the title says it all)
7. I. B. Michalowskij - "Classical forms in architecture" (an excellent book for self - taughts. All important informations about orders and how to use them in architectural compositions. A Russian book from 1920s; I doubt there is an english translation)

Secondly, how can one learn classical composition to design more complex buildings? 99% of treatises only explain orders and isolated forms.
I suppose the best way is to redraw excellent works of the past and sketch in situ, but maybe you know some better solution?.

Thirdly, the hardest part (for me): TECHNOLOGY. I have a guide book from the 1950s but it useless due to contemporary construction standards.
For example, how to make cornices/pillasters/etc. in a typical, three-layers wall? How to avoid a thermal bridge between columns and entablatures? So many questions :? I would be sooo grateful if someone could give me hints...

regards!
 

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There is a plethora books on the subject aside from the cannon. The easiest way to find them is to search AbeBooks or Book Finder and set the publication date to pre 1900.

https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchEntry?cm_sp=SearchF-_-home-_-Results&sts=t

https://www.bookfinder.com/?mode=advanced&new_used=*&first_ed=&signed=&currency=USD

You’ll have to be creative in your searches, but if you have the time you’ll find everything you are looking for. Some of the best titles on the subject are from publishers of rare, out of print books.

Or contact the ICAA/Intbau. They both maintain vast libraries of resources.

Regarding your technical questions, the easiest way to find the answers is to contact any of today’s leading classical architects. They are all very approachable and willing to help. Send them an email.

If you want a list, PM me.


Edit: I just noticed that you’re located in Poland. You have a great resource there.

Contact: http://www.novak-zemplinski.pl/

They are also the admins for Intbau Polska.
https://www.facebook.com/INTBAU.Poland.Chapter/
 

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MRouchell
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Hello,

sorry for starting a brand new thread, but I didn't want to spam the existing ones with my private questions :)

I'm a fresh architecture graduate, trying to learn classical styles on my own. My university was a typical "modernist" school, so any experiments with traditional forms were more or less forbidden... :nono:

Firstly, I'm looking for good textbooks. Could somebody help me with recommendable titles?

I've already read (inter alia):

1. Vitruvius - "Ten books of architecture" (more of a philosopical book than a practical guide)
2. Alberti - "On the art of building" (essential, universal thoughts about architecture)
3. Palladio - "Four books of architecture" (a good book to actually start with. It contains tips for drawing orders and also examples of their usage in beautiful buildings. However, it's hard to memorize forms as axplained by the author)
4. Vignola - "The five orders of architecture" (orders clearly explained, easy to memorize)
5. William Chambers - "A tretise on the decorative part of civil architecture" (forms, mouldings etc. explained in a very logical way. Also, some general thoughts on composition)
6. George Gibbs - "Rules for drawing the several parts of architecture" (the title says it all)
7. I. B. Michalowskij - "Classical forms in architecture" (an excellent book for self - taughts. All important informations about orders and how to use them in architectural compositions. A Russian book from 1920s; I doubt there is an english translation)

Secondly, how can one learn classical composition to design more complex buildings? 99% of treatises only explain orders and isolated forms.
I suppose the best way is to redraw excellent works of the past and sketch in situ, but maybe you know some better solution?.

Thirdly, the hardest part (for me): TECHNOLOGY. I have a guide book from the 1950s but it useless due to contemporary construction standards.
For example, how to make cornices/pillasters/etc. in a typical, three-layers wall? How to avoid a thermal bridge between columns and entablatures? So many questions :? I would be sooo grateful if someone could give me hints...

regards!
The American Vignola - A Guide to the Making of Classical Architecture by William R. Ware.

The Secrets of Architectural Composition by Nathaniel Curtis.

The Classical Language of Architecture by John Summerson
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
^^ Thank you for your answers! :bow:

PS. I just remembered - there is a book by Rob Krier; "Architectural Composition". It isn't really a guide to "classical architecture", but it gives plenty of basic information about what kinds of general solutions were used in the past. I would consider it a good textbook for students...
 
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