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Very interesting article,posing some very good questions,this is a great thread looking forward to see what is said

I remember years ago some friends were living in an apartment block overlooking the ocean out on Dee Why Point which was badly affected from concrete cancer,the body corp were spending heaps of money trying to resolve the problem
 

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concrete these days have so much more strength and durablity then years ago.
 

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Didn't everyone see 'Life after People' ? Buildings will just disappear over time...nothing is permanent. Steel will one day corrode and rust back to it's original state destroying the concrete encasing it. You and I are just atoms, forever zooming across the Universe...THE END.
 
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what are you talking thousands and thousands of years. ? not a few decades.
 

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I imagine that a lot of the high-rises in the CBD that were built in the 50s to the 70s when concrete was not nearly as strong and resiliate as now will be demolished and newer better taller skyscrapers will replace them as the need arises
 

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Absolutely, but I'm talking the high rise buildings in our CBDs crumbling or requiring so many millions in repairs that it's not worth keeping them upright in the next couple of decades while (hopefully) we're all still around on the basis of what the linked articles seem to suggest
Not sure about Brisbane but we have the occasional closed multi story building stuck in a time warp between sale and demolition that lasts for years. Once maintenance stops the building goes in to quick decline. When the National Mutual Centre closed down it started to shed marble sections from its facade. The glass became filthy and aluminium mouldings started to corrode. The rebar within the concrete begins to rust before it is encased in new concrete and it is only time till the entire structure is doomed...but we see it through Human eyes and lifespan so it is slow, yet if you live a while you notice new from old.
I have stood inside the Pantheon in Rome and pondered it's amazing construction using volcanic pumice aggregate the higher the dome rose so it was strong yet light. Sure, in old days the walls were very thick at the base before steel frames and reinforced concrete. Guess it's all a cost benefit in the end. Buildings are not built to last centuries so wonder how 20th Century landmarks will stand the test of time...and maintenance ?
 
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