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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Please, no comments on the subject matter or the creativeness (or lack of it) in this photo.

What I would like to know is how you can take a photo of subjects, like these lined up earth movers, when they are backlit by the sky? In this photo, I waited until about a half-hour before sunset, hoping that would help. I need to add that I must hold the camera up above my head because there is a 10 foot fence with barbed wire at the top. But, I guess my main question is how do I take a photo of subjects that are backlit, when I don't have any means of lighting up part of the subjects that is 30 feet away? I thought of using black and white, but I like the orange color of the earth movers. Ideas?? (Sorry about the size of the photo, but my usual photo storage program is having technical difficulties.)

 

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You have to make the 'F' (aperture?) value higher. That keeps the same amount of time for the shutter, but it lets in less light. At least that's what always works for me. I'm pretty much a novice, so there might be other things you can do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Mock said:
A fill flash might do the trick.
I actually have my flash going off in a similar shot, but it only lights up the first earth mover. If I had some major lighting equipment, I could probably light up all the way to the last earth mover. It's a good 40 feet away from the camera.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
^How would I go about spot metering in front of the other scoopers, and how would that help me set my camera's exposure? I need a little more explanation.
 

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well i think it's a pretty good shot. But if the subject you want to photograph is more backlit, it would probably help to meter the exposure on the background, and then to lock the exposure. Then recompose your shot with the same exposure. I think this would help if the background is overexposed, but i don't know if this is the problem you're facing.

So focus on the background, if possible lock the exposure, else remember the the aperture value and shutter speed. Use the same values to recompose your shot.
 
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