SkyscraperCity banner
1 - 20 of 75 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,373 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am interested in knowing the list of all countries which currently have no motorways in the definition of what we know of a road that has at least two two lanes on each direction, central reservation, hard shoulder (emergency lane) and controlled acess system.

The only country I can think of now is Montenegro although I think Moldova, Malta and Latvia also have no motorways.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,574 Posts
Smaller island nations and many countries in Africa, Asia & maybe some in Latin America ( am not sure abt Surinam or French Guiana etc )

In Asia, I think Laos , Myanmar, Cambodia, Nepal, Bhutan , Mongolia, Yemen, Bangladesh Tajikistan , Kyrgyzstan, North Korea, Syria don't have well-established modern inter-city highways

Latvia and Estonia spring to mind...
Seriously??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,554 Posts
Monaco and Andorra.

However Belarus has motorways.

Maybe Iceland hasn't.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
53,109 Posts
Several misassuptions in this thread already.

Cuba, Belarus, Myanmar, North Korea and Syria do have motorways.

The largest country without motorways is probably the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). 71 million people and only a few thousand kilometers of paved road. Nigeria does have some motorways in Lagos and Abuja and several long-distance dual carriageways.
 

·
Leudimin
No 41, not good
Joined
·
8,966 Posts
I can think of Andorra, Monaco, the Vatican, Liechtenstein... San Marino has a dual carriageway AFAIK.

But now, even fictional countries, like Charliland (The mine one), Norscand, or the Koana Islands, have motorways!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,554 Posts
Maldives Tuvalu Nauru Seyshelles Mauritius Capo Verde Papua New Guinea, etc...
 

·
Funkin' down the Track
Joined
·
706 Posts
Regarding Cuba, the motorways there would not satisfy the definition in the opening post. Some stretches might, but generally there is no central reservation, no access control (horses and carriage commonly seen on the very right-hand side of the road), turn-offs are often at-grade and there are even level train crossings. Nonetheless, these roads are perceived in Cuba as autopista.

Comparable situations will apply in many other developing nations. It's just what you do when you do not want to spend the full monty on a motorway: first you sacrifice the hard shoulder, then minor turn-offs are built at-grade, finally you allow non-motorised traffic on the road. It's something that you see happening for various reasons in nations as developed as the UK and Italy. Yet due to their overall function and driving speeds, these routes operate as the de-facto motorways of developing countries.

In that light, you inevitably end on a slippery slope when determining whether a country has motorways or not. I would count Cuba notwithstanding the deficiences mentioned above. Among the countries without motorways (not even when the definitions is made a bit flexible), you can count a lot of island states and vast parts of Africa. Among the others, I could add the following states that have not been mentioned:

Americas: Belize, Guatemala, Bolivia, Surinam, Guyana, Paraguay.
Asia: Cambodia, Laos, Afghanistan, Bhutan, Nepal, Mongolia, most of the Central Asian countries
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,848 Posts
I can think of Andorra, Monaco, the Vatican, Liechtenstein... San Marino has a dual carriageway AFAIK.

But now, even fictional countries, like Charliland (The mine one), Norscand, or the Koana Islands, have motorways!
Even though Liechtenstein itself has no motorways, it still has the best motorway links, with Swiss and Austrian motorways at either side, with clear visibility of the Swiss motorway in the border area...
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
12,164 Posts
Regarding Cuba, the motorways there would not satisfy the definition in the opening post. Some stretches might, but generally there is no central reservation, no access control (horses and carriage commonly seen on the very right-hand side of the road), turn-offs are often at-grade and there are even level train crossings. Nonetheless, these roads are perceived in Cuba as autopista.
I've traveled most of autopistas (except the southern ones) and they all had central reservation, acces control (if they're some horses on it then also Serbian, Romanian and some other motorways wouldn't count as such just few years ago) and I've not seen turnofs at grade. Yes there is one level train crossing - but I think that such exist (or existed) even in USA and Netherlands.

However they are done as it was usual for motorways of sixties, they didn't improve with time (yet).
 

·
Funkin' down the Track
Joined
·
706 Posts
^^ Below is a photo that I took in 2005. At-grade turn-off and a central reservation not really worth the name, all in one picture. But maybe the picture is not fully representative. For the rest, you have a valid point when you say that Cuba built its autopistas sixty years back and that the main issue is that improvements elsewhere (train crossings, which we indeed had in NL until the 1980s) never made their way to Cuba.

 
1 - 20 of 75 Posts
Top