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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Liverpool Churches. (no cathedral pics please)

This thread is for parochial places of worship in the Liverpool area,including Wirral. Churches,Synagogues,Mosques, Temples etc,but excluding the cathedrals. The City of Liverpool has only a single church within its boundaries that can be classified as as Medieval, All Saints, Childwall. The origins of this church and of St Mary, Walton,are pre-conquest ,both churches are mentioned in the Domesday Book but nothing from the Saxon period remains other than a fragment cross shaft. Despite this the city still has elven Grade 1 listed places of worship,all from the Victorian period.

Liverpool didn't attain parochial status until 1699. In my opinion,having looked at the evidence,this has more to do with the vested interests of successives Rectors at the Mother Church, St Mary, Walton, than evidence,that is usually put forward 'the lowly status' of the town. St Peter's Church, the first parish church opened in 1704, in Church St. It was quickly followed by: St George's, Derby Square,1730, St Thomas, Park Lane,1750, St Paul, St Paul's Square,1763 and St John, were St John's Gardens are today,1775. All have been lost, in fact in the only 18thc church remaining in the city centre is, St Peter RC, Seel St. Losses from the 19th century imclude, St Katherine Abercromby Square, and St Michael, Upper Pitt St, both particularly sad.(Correction. There are 10 grade 1 places of worship(can't believe the RC is only Grade 11*,bit iffy that) All Hallows,St George, StMichael, St Agnes, St Clare,St John the Baptist,Princes rd Synagogue and the Unitarian church,all 19thc rather than Victorian. The other two are the Cathedral and All Saints Childwall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·

Our Lady and St Nicholas, the parish church of Liverpool. Founded in 1360 as a chapel of ease to St Mary Walton. 1) the church in the 1740's. 2)The church today. The only part of the church of any antiquity is the steeple,1811-15. The rest of the church was rebuilt in the 1950's after war damage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

St George's Church, 1730, was built on the site of the castle. Demolished around 1900 to make way for the Victoria monument Derby Square.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·

1) St Peter's Church, Church St,1704,demolished in the 1920's. St Paul's Church, St Paul's Square,1763-69. Abandoned by the 1930's.
 

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Belvidere Rd. unsure of the name, the sign by the front door says 'Site for proposed picture house'




St. Peters, Church St.

 

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Excellent start to what has the potential to be another interesting and informative thread.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Great pics Doug. I agree Joe, there's so much of interest to discover,not just Liverpool but the metro area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
My interest in Parish churches(medieval anyway) started about twelve of thirteen years ago, after a visit to the Saxon church of St John,Escomb, County Durham. This humble little building,which apart from the addition of a new window in the 19c and slate roof, has remained unaltered since it was first built in the 670's ! Well over a thousand years as a place of worship,refuge and consolation, has imbued this (and others like it) for me personally with a sort of aura. Almost as though the very fabric of the building,has absorbed and holds in some way,the meditations,yearnings,grief and ecstacy of countless generations of parishoners. An intensity and depth of human emotion,communal and personal,from beginning to end,the font to the graveyard. No other piece of ground or space is comparable to the medieval parish church in this respect.

It's only fairly recently i've come to appreciate modern churches(Victorian to the present) Most Victorian churches were built in the Decorated Gothic style. A lot quite unimaginative,some predictably slipping in to pastiche. A few, and in Liverpool we are lucky to have several,show the originality and imagination to set them apart. One such church, is St Agnes,Ullet rd. An amazing sight externally,almost like a miniature french gothic cathedral. Internally, 'Early English Gothic' with purbeck marble columns and a stone vaulted nave, a beautiful building.

The bonus in having an interest in buildings is it's free ! So with Victorian churches. Understanding these buildings can make a visit to the most mundane,grim and grotty place in to a an amenable experience. Every town has a least one half decent church,usually visible on arrival in the town centre. Just look !

As the poet wrote;

A serious house on serious earth it is,
In whose blent air all our compulsions meet
Are recognised and robed as destinies,
And that much never can be obsolete,
Since someone wil forever be surprising
A hunger in himself to be more serious
And gravitating with it to this ground

Amen to that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·

Gustav Adolfs Kyrka, 1883,Park Lane. Better known as the Swedish Seaman's church. One of my favourite Liverpool buildings, not just chuches,a profusion of gables,stepped gables and arches. (sorry about the poor quality photos,anyone got a better one?)
 

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The chapel attached to the former Notre Dame Convent, situated between Mount Pleasant and Maryland St.



St Philip Neri, Catherine Street - early 20th century.



St Bride's, Percy St - a beautiful Neoclassical church from 1830

 

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From around Princes Road / Avenue

Greek Orthodox Church (of St Nicholas) c. 1870



Princes Road Synagogue - early 1870s. Its real beauty lies within.



Former Welsh Presbyterian Church - 1868, emphasising the Welsh influence on Liverpool and L8 in particular. Designed by the same architects of the above synagogue but couldn't be more different. One of my favourites.



Al Rahma Mosque - imo as unimpressive as WPC is impressive

 

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The pyramidal Catholic Church of St Jerome, Formby (c. 1975). Designed I believe by the brother of the parish's founding priest, which might explain it.
 

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The pyramidal Catholic Church of St Jerome, Formby (c. 1975). Designed I believe by the brother of the parish's founding priest, which might explain it.
:lol: What a terrible looking building. It would look a bit better with a gigantic cruxific coming out of the roof at one angle, and a giant jesus statue (as in rio or lisbon) out at another angle. At least then you'd know it was a church.

Does it have a so-called "locals nickname" that no-one in real life has ever called it? "The Formby Pyramid with an unsatisfactory boxy porch"?

Talking of which, I have some "Dome of Home" (LOL, as if ANY sailor has ever called it that!!) photos somewhere I will put up if I can find my photo hosting account details and remember how to post pictures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The chapel attached to the former Notre Dame Convent, situated between Mount Pleasant and Maryland St.



St Philip Neri, Catherine Street - early 20th century.



St Bride's, Percy St - a beautiful Neoclassical church from 1830

Two crackers there Joe. I like the first one as well, never seen it before. It's apsidal, Early English, with plate tracery. Good little building.
 

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:lol: What a terrible looking building. It would look a bit better with a gigantic cruxific coming out of the roof at one angle, and a giant jesus statue (as in rio or lisbon) out at another angle. At least then you'd know it was a church.

Does it have a so-called "locals nickname" that no-one in real life has ever called it? "The Formby Pyramid with an unsatisfactory boxy porch"?

Talking of which, I have some "Dome of Home" (LOL, as if ANY sailor has ever called it that!!) photos somewhere I will put up if I can find my photo hosting account details and remember how to post pictures.
I like it. I think. :shifty:

I remember something from my childhood about there being originally plans for a large cross to be mounted at the apex of the pyramid. Doesn't look like that happened. The 70s were still really a part of the period of postwar austerity when you look back at them with the perspective we have now.

Along similar lines, but much better, is the earlier St William of York, in nearby Thornton:




Hope my posting of latter-day horrors (which I have some regard for as it happens) is not polluting the aesthetic pleasures being had by those looking at photos of the other churches on this thread. Lol, as they say.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
As Joe says about the Synagogue(grade 1 listed) a lot of the interiors are are often more spectacular than the exteriors. So if possible pics of interiors would be especially welcome:cheers:
 

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St Andrew's Scottish Presbyterian, Rodney Street 1822-3



Grand Central shopping arcade - formerly Central Hall of the Liverpool Wesleyan Mission - early 20th Century



St Vincent de Paul 1850's - designed by Edward Pugin.



The Blackie on the left of this picture (for some reason I can't find a better one) - formerly Great George (st?) Congregational - 1840s. A replacement for a previous church on this site which burnt down.

 

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As Joe says about the Synagogue(grade 1 listed) a lot of the interiors are are often more spectacular than the exteriors. So if possible pics of interiors would be especially welcome:cheers:


Not my image,I'm not sure where I found it now? It's stunning inside though.
 
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